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Full text of "John Samuel Weekes & Ida Isabelle Grover Family Histories: Ancestors and Descendants"

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PROPERTY OF: 
DAVID O. McKAY LIBRARY 

BYU-IDAHO 
REXBURG ID 83460-0405 



DAVID O. MCKAY LIBRARY 



3 1404 00904 0962 



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DAV 
REX 



In many ways each of us is the 
sum total of what our ancestors 
were. The virtues they had may 
be our virtues, their strengths 
may be our strengths, and in a 
way their challenges could be our 
challenges. Some of their traits 
could be our traits. 

I encourage you to begin to 
unlock the knowledge of who you 
really are by learning more about 
your forebears. Alex Haley, the 
author of the book "Roots" said; 
"In all of us there is a hunger, 
marrow deep, to know our 
heritage — to know who we are 
and where we have come from." 



INTRODUCTION 

This book compiles pictures, histories and genealogy of the ancestors and 
descendants of John Samuel Weekes and Ida Isabel Grover. There are so many 
wonderful stories of men, women and children who are God-fearing people with courage 
and integrity. They came from many different lands to find religious and political 
freedom. They suffered persecution both in Europe and America, to give us the freedom 
we enjoy today. As you get to know them you will appreciate and love them for all they 
did for us. We honor them and present this book as a tribute to them. 

For many years. Aunt Opal Clements wrote, gathered, copied and shared histories 
and photos of the family. I collected them and didn't even give a real appreciative thanks 
to her. They sat in apple boxes for many years, then about eight years ago I started 
organizing the histories, using 8 V2 by 14 sheets in the old style genealogy books, and 
making books for our children, hoping they would share these stories with their children 
and gain a greater appreciation for their ancestors. Thanks to my sisters, Nola, Idonna, 
Darlene and Cherrie, we began to update and combine our efforts. The histories were put 
into 8 Vz x 11 binders in sheet protectors. At that time it became apparent that the 
information should be bound into a hard-back book so it could be enjoyed by more of us. 

I believe Aunt Opal is overseeing this project from above. I've felt her influence. 
When I think of the pages and pages of neat handwriting Aunt Opal did when copy 
machines, computers and fax machines were not available, I wonder how she 
accomplished all that she did. This book is one way of saying "Thank you Aunt Opal 
Weekes Clements for all you did for us." 

Many of the Grover and Weekes families have spent years writing letters, 
recording memories, searching libraries, county census records, ship records and any 
other source they could find. All the work that has been done is very much appreciated 
and helped make this book possible. Thanks to all of you for your histories and photos. 

I realize that there is much more that should be done via the internet. I often 
wonder if this publication should be put off while we search the internet, but at the same 
time, I feel we should share what we have and hope that if you get the genealogy bug or 
if you have additional information, you will share it with the family, by giving it to Nola 
Bryan. This book would have been impossible without her dedicated efforts and 
complete cooperation. She has used a lot of patience as I insisted on organizing the book 
in family units using the pedigree charts as a guide. 

I must say thanks to Raedene Jensen for her kindness, patience and help. 

Now that so much work has been done by so many, it's time to stop and read 
about our great heritage. I hope it will make you grateful for all of the rich blessings we 
enjoy because of the sacrifices our ancestors have made. 



Sincerely, 




Joan Nykamp 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 
Brigham Young University-Idaho 



http://archive.org/details/jswksiigrvrOOnykamp 



FAMILY HISTORIES 

John Samuel Weekes & Ida Isabelle Grover 
Ancestors and Descendants 

The Numbers on left correspond with pedigree charts 

Chapter One 

2 & 3 John Samuel Weekes & Ida Isabelle Grover 21 

Marshall Leslie Weekes 75 

Isabel & George Nelson 80 

Ross, Chester, Lynn, Zula, Glenna, Dennis, 
Reid, John 

William Lyman Weekes 133 

Bertha & Olin Jeppson 136 

Nilo, Marjorie, Julia, Idagene, Roxcy, Therba 

Maude & Gerald Jeppson 167 

Gerald, Kay, Peter, Gene 

Ursel Weekes 194 

Opal & Keith Clements 198 

Eldora & Lynn Randall 208 

DeAnn, Dale, Howard 

Alta& Everett Brindle 226 

Joyce, Stanley, Alden 

Madonna & Newell Piquet 239 

Sharon, Joan, Idonna, Cherrie, Nola, Roger, 
Marilyn, Carol, Darlene, Vernon, Spencer 

Chapter Two 

4 & 5 Sidney Weekes & Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim family 301 

Chapter Three 

6 & 7 Marshall Hubbard Grover & Isabelle Orr family 331 



Chapter Four 

8 & 9 Robert Weekes & Mary Ann Baldry family 355 

Chapter Five 

10 & 1 1 Samuel Pilgrim & Betsy Coote family 369 

Chapter Six 

12 & 13 Thomas Grover & Caroline Nickerson family 379 

Chapter Seven 

14 & 15 Thomas Orr & Christina Bennett family 441 

Chapter Eight 

1 6 & 1 7 William Weekes & Sarah Hibbins family 449 

Chapter Nine 

1 8 & 1 9 James Baldry & Elizabeth Hall family 453 

Chapter Ten 

24 & 25 Thomas Grover Jr. & Polly Spalding family 461 

Chapter Eleven 

26 & 27 Freeman Nickerson & Hulda Chapman family 469 

Chapter Twelve 

28 & 29 Robert Orr & Elizabeth McQueen family 489 

Chapter Thirteen 

Chart 10 - #2 & 3 Captain Thomas Grover & Sarah Sherman family 495 

Chapter Fourteen 

Chart 10 - #4 & 5 Benjamin Grover & Sarah Bacon family 501 

Chapter Fifteen 

Chart 10 - #8 & 9 Thomas Grover Senior & Sarah Buck family 507 

Chapter Sixteen 

Chart 10 - #10 & 11 Nathaniel Bacon & Judith Wyman family 511 



Chapter Seventeen 

Chart 10 - # 16 & 17 Mathew Grover & Mary Davis family 519 

Chapter Eighteen 

Chart 1 2 - #2 & 3 Eleazer Nickerson & Thankful Chase family 523 

Chapter Nineteen 

Chart 12 - #4 & 5 Eleazer Nickerson & Sarah Bearse family 529 

Chapter Twenty 

Chart 12 - #8 & 9 John Nickerson & Elizabeth Baker family 533 

Chapter Twenty-One 

Chart 1 2 - # 1 6 & 17 Nicholas Nickerson & Mary Darby family 539 

Chapter Twenty-Two 

Chart 1 6 - #2 & 3 Thomas Grover & Elizabeth Smith family 545 

Chapter Twenty-Three 

Chart 42 - #2 & 3 William Nickerson & Ann Busby family 553 

A list of descendants of John Weekes and Ida Grover 574 



The pedigree charts in this book only go back far enough to contain the 
name of those people we have collected histories for. Some of the 
family lines go as far back as 16 generations. If you are interested 
in creating or updating your family files, please contact Nola Bryan in 
Boise, Idaho, at 208-362-3772 or Joan Nykamp in Idaho Falls, Idaho, 
at 208- 523-7378 



Pedigree Chart 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 



Chart no. 1 



16 William, Weekes 



8 Robert Weekes 



B:1753 
M: 5 Sep 1784 
-D: 6 Apr 1823 



BEPS 



17 Sarah HIBBINS 



4 Sidney Weekes 



2 John Samuel WEEKES 
B:8 Sep 1873 BEPSC 

P: SMITHFIELD,Cache,Utah 
M: 20 Nov 1894 
P: Lyman. Fremont, ID 
D:22 Apr 1956 
P:SUNNYDELL.M, Idaho 



Leslie 

Isabel 

Lyman 

Bertha 

Maude 

John Samuel Jr. 

Ursel 

Opal 

Eldora 

Alta 

Madonna 



3 Ida Isabel Grover 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 



USA 
Telephone 
208-523-7378 



B: 8 Mar 1842 BEPSC 

P: Bexley, Kent, England 

M: 16 Jul 1864 

P:(End. Hs) Salt L.SL,UT 

D: 14 Apr 1909 

P: Sunnydell, Fremont, ID 



B: 27 Mar 1791 BE S 

P: Bexley.Welling, K.England 

M:3Aug 1818 

P: Dartford.Kent.England 

D: 14 Sep 1853 

P: Fort Bridger, Wyoming 18 James BALDRY 



C: 19 Oct 1760 
D: 6 Apr 1823 



BE S 



9 M A BALDRY OR BAULDR 



B:2 Dec 1799 BEPS 

P: Thelnetham.S, England 
D:26 Oct 1888 
P: Smithfield. Cache, UT 



B:1 Sep 1778 
M:11 Mar 1799 
-B: 10 Feb 1833 



BEPSC 



19 Elizabeth HALL 



B:Abt 1775 
B:1832 

20 Joseph PILGRIM 



BE SC 



10 Samuel PILGRIM 



B: 23 Apr 1797 



BE SC 



C: 20 Nov 1768 
M: 15 Oct 1789 
D: 



5 Susan Elizabeth PILGRIM 

B: 10 Sep 1835 BEPSC 

P:St. Giles.CC, England 

D:1 May 1888 

P: Smithfield.Cache.UT 1 1 Elizabeth (Betsy) COOTE 



P: GC, Essex, England 
M:11 Dec 1817 
P: Castle Camps, C.Eng. 
"D:4 Feb 1836 
P:Elybath, England 



21 Elizabeth LIVERMORE 

C:1764 

B:8 Dec 1840 

22 William COOTE 



C:2 Sep 1753 
M:5Aug 1790 
D: 



B: 17 May 1794 BE SC 

P: Castle Camps.C.Eng 23 Anne DEBNEY 

D: 30 Mar 1862 

P: Cambridge, C, England 



B:1762 

D:29 May 1827 



24 Thomas Grover JR. 



10 



12 Thomas Grover 



6 Marshall Hubbard Grover 



B: 22 Jul 1807 BEPSC 

P: Whitehall, Washington, NY 
M:20 Feb 1841 
P: Nauvoo,Hancock,IL 
"D:20 Feb 1886 
P: Farmington. Davis, UT 



B:1760 
M:1799 
-D: Feb 1807 



BEPSC 



B:27 Sep 1846 BEPSC 

P: Nauvoo. Hancock, Illinois 

M:11 Dec 1871 

P:S,,UT Endowment House 13 Caroline E NICKERSON 

D:8 Feb 1918 

P: Archer, Madison, Idaho 



25 Polly SPALDING 


11 


B: 22 Feb 1779 


BEPSC 


D: 5 Apr 1859 




26 F NICKERSON 


12 



B:28Jun 1808 BE SC 

P: Cavendish, Windsor, NY 
D: 28 Jul 1889 
P:NearGrantsville,T,UT 



B:5Feb 1779 
M: 19 Jan 1800 
-D: 12 Jan 1847 



BE S 



27 Huldah CHAPMAN 



13 



B: 13 Apr 1874 BEPSC 

P: Grantsville, Tooele, UT 

D:15Jun1942 

P: Sunnydell, Madison, ID 



28 



B: 19 Aug 1780 


BEPS 


D:22 Mar 1860 




Robert ORR 


14 



14 Thomas ORR 



B:4 Aug 1802 
M:16 Apr 1828 
-D:7Nov 1887 



BEPS 



29 



7 Isabella ORR 



B: 18 May 1852 BEPSC 

P: Glasgow, A, Scotland 

D: 25 Oct 1919 

P: Archer.Madison, Idaho 15 



B: 2 Aug 1829 BEPSC 

P:Kilbirnie,A, Scotland 

M: 

P: 

D:17Jun 1888 

P:Grantsviile,Tooele,UT 30 Ebenezer Bennett 



E MC QUEEN OR MC Q 15 

B:15Jun1806 BEPS 

D: 27 Jul 1880 



Christina Bennett 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B: 15 Jan 1830 E SC 

P:Kirkaldy, F.Scotland 
D: 10 Jan 1903 
P: Grantsville, Tooele, UT 



Abt 1804 



31 Isabel KINNIMONT 



B:Abt 1808 
D: 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 16 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 Robert Weekes 



Chart no. 2 



16 Thomas Weekes 



8 Thomas Weekes 



B:Abt 1644 

M: 

D: 



be 



2 Robert Weekes 



B:24 Feb 1733 BEPS 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 

M: 15 Nov 1755 

P: 

D:1822 



1 William, Weekes 



B:1753 BEPS 

P: 

M:5 Sep 1784 

P: 

D:6Apr 1823 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 



Sarah HIBBINS 



(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Ann RICHARDSON 



B:5Jul 1737 BE S 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 
D:1797 
P: 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 
Telephone 
208-523-7378 



B: 7 Jul 1702 BEPSC 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 

Ivt 3 Dec 1725 

P: 

D: 



C: 5 Nov 1676 BEpSC 

P: Fort Cray, Kent, England 1? Ann VVACREL 

M:21 Apr 1701 

P: 

ID: 
P: 



B:Abt 1648 
D: 

18 John INGRAM 



be 



9 Mary INGRAM 



C: 31 Dec 1682 BEPSC 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 
D: 



B:Abt 1656 
M: 
-D: 



BE C 



10 John ALWIN 



5 Mary ALWIN 



C: 6 Oct 1704 BEpSC 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 
D: 
P: 



B:Abt 1678 

IP: 
Ivt 

IP: 
ID 
P 



1 1 Elizabeth MOORE 



Abt 1680 



12 



13 



14 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



15 



19 Mary 



B: Abt 1660 
D: 



BE C 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



IB: 

Ivt 

-D: 



25 



B: 
D: 



26 



27 



28 



B: 
Ivt 
\d: 



29 



30 



31 



B: 
D: 



Pedigree Chart 

No 1 on this chart is the same as no. 17 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances ,, 



2 William HIBBENS 



B:Abt 1737 

P: 

M: 

P: 

D 

P 



1 Sarah HIBBiNS 



C: 19 Oct 1760 BE S 

P: Wilmington, Kent.England 

M:5 Sep 1784 

IP: 

D:6Apr 1823 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 



William, Weekes 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Sarah 



Abt 1741 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B: 
P: 

M: 

P: 
"D: 
P: 



10 



B: 
P: 
M: 
P: 
D: 
P: 



11 



12 



BT 
P: 
M; 
P: 
ID: 
P: 



13 



14 



fBT 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



15 



16 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



17 



18 



B: 
M 
-D: 



19 



B: 
D: 



20 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



BT 

M: 

-D: 



23 



B: 
D: 



24 



BT 

M: 
-D: 



25 



26 



IB: 
M: 
-D: 



27 



B: 
D: 



28 



B: 
fVt 
-D: 



29 



30 



B: 
FVt 
-D: 



31 



Chart no. 3 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 18 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 j ohn BALDRY 



2 Joseph BALDRY 



B:1745 BEP C 

IP: 

M: 13 Apr 1773 

P: Gariboldisham, N.England 

D:23 Nov 1828 

P: Thelnetham, S.England 



B:Abt 1705 BE S 

P: 

M:30Jun 1730 

P: Kettleburg.S, England 

D:1775 

P: Botesdale, S.England 



5 Dorothy GARWOOD 



Abt1709 



1 James BALDRY 



B:1 Sep 1778 BEPSC 

P: Thelnetham, S.England 

M:11 Mar 1799 

P: Barnham, Suffolk, England 

B: 10 Feb 1833 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 



Elizabeth HALL 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Mary TURNER 



B:Abt1756 BE 

P: .Suffolk.England 
D: 
P: 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B: 

P: 
M: 

P: 

ID: 
Ip: 



10 



11 



12 



B: 
P: 
M 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



13 



14 



P: 
M: 
P: 
D: 
P: 



15 



16 



B: 

M: 



17 



18 



19 



20 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



B: 
M; 
.D: 



23 



B: 
D: 



24 



M: 

■ID: 



25 



26 



!BT 

M: 
-D: 



27 



28 



B: 

M: 
iD: 



29 



30 



B: 

M: 

0: 



31 



B: 
D: 



Chart no. 4 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 19 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 Ambrose H ALL 



2 Ambrose HALL 



C:8 Jan 1743/1744 

P: Swanscombe, K.England 

M: 

P: 

D: 



Abt 1717 



1 Elizabeth HALL 



BE SC 



B: Abt 1775 

P: 

M:11 Mar 1799 

P: Barnham, Suffolk, England 

B:1832 

P: Bexley.Kent.England 



James BALDRY 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Mary ADAMS 



Abt 1743 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B^ 
P: 

M: 

P: 
D: 
P: 



10 



B? 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



11 



12 



B: 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



13 



14 



B: 
P: 

M: 

P: 
'D: 
P: 



15 



16 



B: 
M 
-D: 



17 



18 



B: 
M 
-D: 



19 



B: 
D: 



20 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



21 



22 



B: 
M: 
iD: 



23 



B: 
D: 



24 



BT 
M: 
-D: 



25 



26 



M: 
-D: 



27 1 



28 



B: 

M 

-D: 



29 



30 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



31 



B: 
D: 



Chart no. 5 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 20 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances . 



2 Samuel PILGRIM 



B:Abt1745 

P: 

M: 

P: 

D 

P 



1 Joseph PILGRIM 



C: 20 Nov 1768 

P: 

M: 15 Oct 1789 

P: 

D: 

P: 



Elizabeth LIVERMORE 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Susannah Watson 



AM1749 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



"BT 
P: 

M 
P: 

ID: 

IP: 



10 



"BT 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



11 



12 



B7 
P: 

M 
P: 
D: 

IP: 



13 



14 



BT 
P: 

M: 
P: 
D: 

IP: 



15 



Chart no. 6 



16 



B: 

M: 
iD: 



17 



B: 
D: 



18 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



19 



20 



B: 
M: 
4D: 



21 



22 



23 



24 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



25 



B: 
D: 



26 



B: 
M 
*D: 



27 



28 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



29 



B: 
D: 



30 



B: 

M 
^D: 



31 



B: 
D: 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 21 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances A 



2 John LIVERMORE 



Abt 1749 



1 Elizabeth LIVERMORE 



1764 

15 Oct 1789 

8 Dec 1840 



Joseph PILGRIM 

(Spouse of no. 1) 



3 Susannah HUBBARD 



Abt 1753 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



BT 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



10 



BT 
P: 

M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



11 



12 



B: 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



13 



14 



[B: 
P: 

M 

P: 
D: 
P: 



15 



16 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



17 



18 



B: 

M: 

-D: 



19 



20 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



23 



24 



B: 
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25 



B: 
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26 



B^ 
M: 
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27 



B: 
D: 



28 



B^ 
M 
-D: 



29 



B: 
D: 



30 



B: 
M 

Jd: 



31 



B: 
D: 



Chart no. 7 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 22 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances ,, 



2 Henry COOTE 



B:Abt 1742 

P: 

M: 

P: 

D 

P 



1 William COOTE 



2 Sep 1753 



5 Aug 1790 



Anne DEBNEY 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Mary FREEMAN 



Abt 1746 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 



USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



Chart no. 8 



16 



B: 
M: 



B: 




D: 


P: 
FVt 


17 






B: 



18 



19 



B: 
D: 



20 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



23 



24 



25 



B: 
D: 



26 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



27 



28 



29 



B: 
D: 



30 



IB: 
M. 
4D: 



31 



B: 
D: 



Pedigree Chart 

No 1 on this chart is the same as no 23 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances . 



2 William DEBNEY 



B:Abt 1730 

P: 

M:1 Jan 1758 

P: ,SW, Essex, England. 

D: Aft 1781 

P: 



1 Anne DEBNEY 



B:1762 

P: ,SW,Essex, England. 

M:5Aug 1790 

P: 

D: 29 May 1827 

P: 



William COOTE 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Mary TURNER 



Abt 1740 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B: 
P: 
M: 
P: 
D: 
P. 



10 



BT 
P: 
M: 
P: 
ID: 
P: 



11 



12 



BT 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



13 



14 



B: 
P: 

M: 
P: 
"D: 

IP: 



15 



16 



B 
M: 
-D: 



17 



B: 
D: 



18 



B: 
-D: 



19 



20 



B: 

M: 
O: 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



B: 
M 
-D: 



23 



24 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



25 



B: 

D: 



26 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



27 



B: 
D: 



28 



B: 
M 
D: 



29 



30 



ST 

M 
D: 



31 



Chart no. 9 



10 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 24 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 Benjamin Grover 



Chart no. 10 



16 Mathew Grover 



8 Thomas Grover [SIR] 



BEPSC 



B:1650 
M:1673 
-D: 1679/1680 



BEPSC 



17 Mary Davis 



B:1703 BEPSC 

P: Maiden, Stoneham.B, MA 

M:2Mar 1727 

P:Billercia, M.Massachusetts g Sarah BUCK 

D: May 1754 

P: .Grafton, Mass 



B: 16 Jan 1674 

P: Boston, MA 

M27 Feb 1694 

P: Woburn, M.Massachusetts 

D:Abt1733 

P: S.M.Massachusetts 18 Ephraim BUCK 



B: 16 Feb 1658 
D:29 Nov 1727 



BEPSC 



2 Thomas Grover [Captain] 



B: 19 Mar 1738 BEPSC 

P: Grafton.Worcester.MA 

M: 20 Dec 1759 

P: Grafton.Worcester.MA 

D: 1804/1805 

P: Whitehall, Washington, NY 



B: 11 Jan 1674 BEPSC 

P: Woburn, Middlesex, MA 

D:Abt1734 

P: NS, M.Massachusetts 



B: 26 Jul 1646 
M: 1 Jan 1670 
-D:Jan 1721 



BEPSC 



19 Sarah BROOKS 



B:21 Nov 1652 
D:1721 

20 Michael BACON 



BEPSC 



10 Nathaniel BACON 



5 Sarah BACON 



B: 10 Apr 1707 
P:Billerica,MA 
D:May 1754 
P: Grafton, Mass 



B: 18 Sep 1675 
P:Billerica,MA 
Nfc 1697/1698 
P: 

BEPSC D: 24 Jul 1750 
P: Lexington, MA 

11 Judith WYMAN 



BEPSC 



B:1639 

M 22 Mar 1660 
-D: 13 Aug 1707 



BEPSC 



21 Sarah RICHARDSON 



B:Abt 1639 
D: 15 Aug 1694 

22 Francis WYMAN 



BEPSC 



1 Thomas Grover JR. 



B:1760 BEPSC 

P:NearGrafton,W,MA 

M:1799 

P: Fort Ann, Washington, NY 

D: Feb 1807 

P: Whitehall, Washington, NY 



B: 15 Jan 1679 

P: Woburn, Middlesex 

D: Nov 1744 

P: 



12 John SHERMAN 



BEPSC 

Mass 



B: 1618/1619 
M: 2 Oct 1650 
-D:30 Nov 1699 



BEPSC 



23 Abigail Reed 



B: 1632/1633 
D: 

24 Joseph SHERMAN 



BEPSC 



B: 11 Jan 1674 BEPS 

P: OM.MC, Massachusetts 
llvt 1697/1698 



B: 14 Mar 1650 
M 18 Nov 1673 
-D: 20 Jan 1730/1731 



25 Elizabeth WINSHIP 



BEPSC 



Polly SPALDING 

(Spouse of no. 1) 



6 Joseph SHERMAN 



B: 15 Mar 1703 BEPSC D: 11 Nov 1756 
P: Marlborough, MA P: Watertown.Mass 

M:25 Dec 1728 

P: 13 Mary BULLEN 

D:28 Sep 1787 



3 Sarah SHERMAN 



B:27Jun1739 BEPSC 

P: Shrewsbury,Wor.,MA 

D:1804 

P: Near Whitehall, W.NY 



B: 15 Apr 1652 
D: 15 Sep 1652 

26 Ephriam BULLEN 



BEPSC 



B:6 Mar 1681 BEPS 

P: S.MC, Massachusetts 
D:5May 1761 
P:Sherborn,MA 



B: 18 Jul 1653 
NM680 
-D: 1694 



BEPSC 



27 Grace 



B:1663 

D: 10 Aug 1689 

28 John PERHAM 



BE SC 



14 John PERHAM 



7 Sarah PERHAM 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B: 16 Oct 1703 BEPSC 

P: Chelmsford, MA 
D:2Mar 1772 



B: 

M: 15 Dec 1663 
ID: 23 Jan 1720 



BEPS 



29 Liddiah SHIPLEY 



B: 27 Jan 1667 BE SC 

P: CMC, Massachusetts 

M: 27 Dec 1692 

P: CMC, Massachusetts 

D: 29 Jul 1743 

P:Grafton,W,Massachusetts30 Samuel FLETCHER 



C:1 Feb 1657 
D:21 Jun1710 



BEPS 



15 Lydia FLETCHER 



B: 26 Sep 1669 BE SC 

P : C, MC, Massachusetts 
D:2 May 1742 
P: Grafton.W, Massachusetts 



B: 1632 
>lvt14 0ct 1659 
iD:9 Dec 1697 



BEP 



31 Margaret HAILSTON 



B:Abt 1628 
D: 1675 



BEP 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 25 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 j ames SPAULDING 



Chart no. 11 



16 Andrew SPAULDING 



B: 27 Oct 1714 BEPSC 

P:Chelmsford,M,MA 

M:1736 

P: Westford.Middlesex.MA 

D: 

P: Westford.Middlesex.MA 



2 Silas SPALDING 



B: 25 Mar 1757 
P:Westford,MA 
M: 24 Apr 1778 
P: MASON, NH 
D:29 Feb 1812 
P: Fort Ann, NY 



BEPSc 



8 Andrew SPAULDING 

B:25 Mar 1678 BEPS 

|P: Chelmsford, MA 
!Nt 5 Feb 1701 
P: Chelmsford, M, MA 
— D: 7 Nov 1753 
|P:Chelmsford,MC,MA 

9 Abigail WARREN 

B: 23 Jan 1682 BE S 

P:Chelmsford,MA 
D: 12 May 1768 
P:Chelmsford,M,MA 



B: 19 Nov 1652 
M: 30 Apr 1674 
— D: 5 May 1713 

17 Hannah JEFES 



BEPSC 



B:1655 

D:21 Jan 1730 

18 Jacob WARREN 



BEPSC 



B: 26 Oct 1642 
M:21 Jun 1667 
— D:1722 

19 Mary HILDRETH 



BEPS 



B:1650 

D: 17 Dec 1730 



BEPS 



1 Joseph UNDERWOOD 



5 Anna UNDERWOOD 



BE SC 



B: 16 Oct 1717 

P: Watertown.MA 

D:24 May 1770 

P: Westford.Middlesex.MA 



B: 28 May 1681 

P: Watertown.MA 

M; 27 May 1707 

P: 

D:1761 

P: 



be 



20 Joseph UNDERWOOD 

B:1650 
Ivt 1672 
D: 16 Feb 1691 



21 Elizabeth 



B: 1650/1655 
D: 1700/1730 

22 Nathaniel PARKER 



B: 16 May 1651 

1 1 Susanna (Sarah) PARKER "J 24 Sep 1677 
B:29 Dec 1687 BEP D: 7 DeC 1737 



BEpS 



1 Polly SPALDING 



B:22 Feb 1779 BEPSC 

P: Andover, Essex, MA 

M:1799 

P: Fort Ann.Washington.NY 

ID: 5 Apr 1859 

P:Weedsport,NY 



P: R.M.Massachusetts 

D: 18 Feb 1769 

P: 



12 Samuel BROWNE 



23 Bethia POLLEY 



B: 12 Feb 1659 
D: 23 Aug 1748 

24 John BROWNE 



BEPS 



Thomas Grover JR. 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



6 Samuel Brown 



3 Hannah Brown 



B: 13 Nov 1860 
P:Hollis,NH 
D: 22 Aug 1833 
P:Granville,NY 



BEpSc 



B: 11 Feb 1693 BE S 

P: R.Essex, Massachusetts 

Ivt 17 May 1716 

P: S.Essex, Massachusetts 

D:25 Feb 1755 

P: Salisbury, Essex, MA 



B: 5 Feb 1658 
Ivt 31 Aug 1685 
-D: 18 Sep 1729 



25 Abigail BROWNE 



BE 



B: 17 Oct 1737 BEPSc 

P: LITTLETON, MA 

M: 26 Mar 1756 

P: Hollis.H.New Hampshire 13 Elizabeth WHt 

D:11 Jun 1832 

P: Fort Ann, W, New York 



B: 24 Oct 1665 
D: 

26 Josiah WHEELER 



BEP 



B: 12 Jul 1695 BE S 

P: Salisbury, Essex, MA 
D:24 Feb 1787 
P: 



B: 23 Apr 1669 
Ivt 
-D:1734 



BEPS 



27 Elizabeth WORSTER 



B: 16 Feb 1671 
D: 



BEPS 



28 



14 



7 Mary GLENE 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B:1732 BE Sc 

P:LITTLETON,Mass 

D:26 Nov 1760 

P: Hollis.H.New Hampshire 



B: 

M 
-D: 



29 



30 



15 



B: 
M 
D: 



31 



B: 
D: 



11 



12 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 26 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 
B Baptized 



Chart no. 12 
16 Nicholas NICKERSON 



8 John NICKERSON 



B: 10 Aug 1628 

M: 1655 

D: 



BEPSC 



E Endowed 
P Sealed to parents 
S Sealed to spouse 
C Children's ordinances 



2 Eleazer NICKERSON 



B:4 Mar 1749 BEPS 

P: Cape Cod, Barnstable, MA 
M: 15 Nov 1769 
P:Prob. Dennis,B,MA 
D:26 Nov 1796 
P:So. Dennis.B.MA 



3 Thankful Chase 



B:25 Feb 1750 BEPS 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 
D:6 Feb 1834 
P: South Dennis.MA 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



B: 10 Sep 1664 BEPSC 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 17 |\/|arv DERBY 



4 Eleazer NICKERSON 
B:2 Apr 1718 BEPSC 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 
M: 17 Feb 1742 
P:So. Dennis.B.MA 
D: 
P:So. Dennis.B.MA 



B:1644 

D: 16 Mar 1705/1706 



1 FREEMAN NICKERSON 
B:5 Feb 1779 BE S 

P:So. Dennis, Brnsth, MA 
M: 19 Jan 1800 
P: Cavendish, Wndsr.VT 
D: 12 Jan 1847 
P: Chariton River B,PC,IA 



Huldah CHAPMAN 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



M: 19 Aug 1696 
P:,Barnstable,MS 
ID: 23 Jul 1745 
P: Yarmouth, Barnstable.MA 18 John BAKER 



BEPSC 



9 Elizabeth BAKER 



B:Abt1675 BEPSC 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 
D: 5 Jan 1765 
P: South Dennis, B,MS 



B:1 May 1645 

M 

-D:1712 



BEPSC 



19 Alice PIERCE (PEARSE) 

C:21 Jul 1650 BE SC 

D:1673 

20 Joseph BEARSE 



10 Benjamin BEARSE 



Sarah BEARSE 



B:21 Jun1682 



BEPSC 



B: 25 Jan 1651 
lNt3 Dec 1676 
iD:27 Jan 1728 



BEPS 



B: 5 Jul 1722 BEPSC 

P: Barnstable, Barnstable, MA 

D: 

P:So. Dennis.B.MA 



P: Barnstable,Barnstable,MA 21 Martna TAYLOR 

M4 Feb 1702 

P: Barnstable, Barnstable, MA 

D: 15 May 1748 



B: 18 Dec 1650 
D:27 Jan 1728 

22 Samuel COBB 



BEPS 



1 1 Sarah COBB 



B: 12 Oct 1654 
M: 20 Dec 1680 
iD: 27 Dec 1727 



BEPSC 



B:21 Aug 1681 BEPSC 

P: Barnstable,Barnstable,MA 23 E|jzabeth TAY LOR 

D: 14 Jan 1742 

P:Hyannis 



B:1655 

D:4 May 1721 

24 John Chase 



BEPSC 



12 Thomas Chase 



BEPSC 



B: 16 Apr 1649 

M: 1674/1675 

iD: 27 Feb 1684 



BEPSC 



B: 20 Aug 1679 

P:Yarmouth,Barnstable,MA 25 E | izabetn BAKER 

NM726 



6 Richard Chase 



B:3 Mar 1714/1715 BEPSC 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 

M:21 Jan 1734/1735 

P: ,Barnstable,MS. 

D: 14 Jan 1794 

P: Dennis, Barnstable.MA 



B: 1648 
P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MS. D: 15 u\ a y -\jqq 

"D:20 Nov 1767 

P:Yarmouth,Bamstable,MA 26 Richard GOWELL 



BEPSC 



13 Sarah GOWELL 



B:1682 

P:Kittery,York,ME 

D: 

P: 



BEPSC 



B:1646 
M: 
iD:1730 



BE SC 



27 Hannah REMICK 



B: 25 Apr 1656 
D:1729 

28 Samuel BERRY 



BEPSC 



14 Samuel BERRY 



7 Thankful BERRY 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B:8Jan 1715/1716 
P: Yarmouth, MA 
D: 15 Mar 1807 
P: Yarmouth, MA 



B: Nov 1691 BEPSC 

P: Harwich, Barnstable, MA 
M: 16 Oct 1712 
P: Harwich, Barnstable, MA 
BEPSC D:1741 



B: 11 Jul 1654 
M 

-D: 12 Feb 1704 



29 Elizabeth Bell 



BEPSC 



B:Abt 1659 
D: 

30 William Gray 



BEPSC 



15 Rebecca Gray 

B:Abt1691 

P: Of Harwich, B, MA 

D: 

P: 



BEPSC 



IB: 10 Oct 1650 

M 

-D: 1723 



BEPSC 



31 Rebecca DILLINGHAM 



B:1650 
D: 



BEPSC 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 27 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 Moses CHAPMAN 



2 Eliphalet CHAPMAN 



B: 19 Jul 1742 BEPSC 

P: Norwich, New London, CT 

M: 16 Oct 1773 

P: Cavindish,Windsor,VT 

D: 16 Feb 1813 

P: Revolutionary Ce.W.VT 



1 Huldah CHAPMAN 

B: 19 Aug 1780 BEPS 

P:,TllndCo.,CT 

M: 19 Jan 1800 

iP: Cavendish.Wndsr.VT 

D: 22 Mar 1860 

P: Provo.Utah.UT 



FREEMAN NICKERSON 6 Richard Chase 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



This person is the same as 
no. 6 on chart no. 12 



3 Abigail Chase 



B:1 May 1759 BEPSC 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 
D:5 Feb 1818 
P: CMP.Upper Canada 



7 Thankful BERRY 



This person is the same as 
no. 7 on chart no. 12 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



Chart no. 13 



16 Simon CHAPMAN 



8 Joseph CHAPMAN 



B:1643 
M:21 Mar 1666 
-D: 25 Aug 1735 



BEPS 



17 Mary BREWER 



B:10Nov1711 BEPS 

P: Norwich, New London, CT 

M: 

P: 

D:1753 



B: Mar 1682 BEPSC 

P: Ipswich, Essex, MA 
M: 23 Apr 1707 
P: ROWLEY, Essex.MA 
*D:10Jun 1725 
P: , Norwich, NL.Connecticut 18 Paul WENTWORTH 



B:23 Sep 1648 
D: 23 Feb 1724 



BEPS 



9 Mercy WENTWORTH 

B:25 Dec 1692 BEPSC 

P: Norwich, New London, CT 

D:3Jun1725 

P: Norwich, New London, CT 



B:1657 

MBef21 Apr 1681 
-D:1750 



BEPSC 



10 



5 Mrs. Sarah CHAPMAN 

B:Abt 1712 BE S 

P:OfNorwich,NL,CT 

D: 

P: 11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



19 Catherine Steward 



B:8Jun1658 
D: 



BEPSC 



20 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



23 



B: 
D: 



24 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



25 



26 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



27 



B: 
D: 



28 



B: 
M 
D: 



29 



30 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



31 



13 



14 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 28 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 
B Baptized 
E Endowed 




16 

8 Robert ORR 

B:31 Jul 1720 BEPSC 


Chart no. 14 
Patrick ORR 

B:1679 BE SC 

M: 12 Sep 1701 

D: 


P Sealed to parents 
S Sealed to spouse 
C Children's ordinances , Patrick ORR 




IP: Lochbridge, Ayr, Scot 

M:13Jun1745 

P: Kilbirnie, A, Scotland 


17 Margaret Miller 

B:1682 
D: 


BE SC 


B:Abt 1754 


BEPSC 


D: 






P: Lochridge, Ayr, Scotland 
M: 19 Dec 1777 


P: 


18 George Allan 

B: Abt 1698 






P: Kilbirnie.Ayr.Scotland 


9 Janet Allan 


M 






D: 




B:1724 BE SC |"' 






P: 




P: Of Kirkland,Ayr,Scotlanc 
D: 


19 Mrs George Allan 

B: Abt 1702 




2 


James ORR 






P: 


D: 






B: 10 Dec 1780 BEPSC 






P: Newton, Ayr. .Scotland 








20 






M: 10 Apr 1802 








B: 






P:Kilburnie,Ayrs,Sctld. 
D:7 0ct 






10 


Robert SPEIR 




m. 
D: 








B:Abt 1733 








P: 








P: 
M 


21 
B: 






5 Janet SPEIR 






P 




D: 






B: Jan 1759 


BE SC 




D 










P: Kilmacolm, R.Scotland 
n- 




P 




22 

IB: 






P: 




11 


Janet LANG 




M: 
D: 






B 


Abt 1737 






1 


Robert ORR 






P 
D 
P 




23 


B: 






B: 4 Aug 1802 BEPS 


D: 






P: Newton, Kilbirnie.Ayrshire 












M: 16 Apr 1828 






24 






P: Kilbirnie.Ayrshire, Scotland 






IB: 






D:7 Nov 1887 




12 


M: 






P: Grantsville, Tooele, UT 






B 
P 
M 




25 


B: 






E MC QUEEN OR MC Q 6 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 


William HOUSTON 




P 
D 




D: 






IB: 


BE SC 








IP: Of Port Glasgow 


R.Sctld. 




P 




26 








M: 28 May 1775 








IB: 








P: Port Glasgow.R.Sctld. 
D: 


13 






rvc 
D: 






B 












P: 




P 
D 




27 


B: 




3 


Ann HOUSTON 






P 




D: 






B:25 Feb 1778 BEPSC 






P: Port Glasgow.R.Sctld 

D: 19 May 1845 

P: Kilbernie.Ayrs.Sctldand 






14 


John WHITEHILL 


28 


James WHITEHILL 

B:1681 

Nt 20 May 1706 

D: 


BE S 






B:24 May 1707 BEP 


C 




7 


Margaret WHITEHILL 




P: Renfew, Scotland 

M. 

P: Port Glasgow, R.Scot 

D: 


29 Mary BANNANTIN 

B: 1685 
D: 


BE S 




B: 12 Aug 1742 


BEPSC 








P: Of Port Glasgow 


R.Sctld. 


15 


P: 

Elizabeth EWING 

B:9Jun1717 BEP 
P: Renfew, Scotland 
D: 


30 William EWING (EV\ 
B: 

M:22 Jun 1708 

31 Agnes RANKIN 
B: 

D: 


rEN) 


P 

J 

1 
Ic 


repared by 
Dan Nykamp 
4054 N 65 E 
laho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 


D: 
P: 


BE S 
BE S 


T 
2 


slephone Date prepared 
08-523-7378 27 Mar 2006 


P: 





Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 29 on chart no. 1 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances . 



2 OSBORNE MCQUEEN 



1781 

Down, Ireland 



BE S 



1 E MC QUEEN OR MC Q 

B:15Jun1806 BEPS 

P:Killyleagh, DC, Ireland 

M: 16 Apr 1828 

P: Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland 

D: 27 Jul 1880 

P: Grantsville, Tooele, UT 



Robert ORR 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Elizabeth Copeland 



BE S 



B: 1776/1781 

P: Down, Ireland 

D:Jul 1880 

P: Kilburnie.Ayr, Scotland 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B: 
P: 

M 
P: 
D: 
P: 



10 



B7" 
P: 
M: 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



11 



12 



"B - 
P. 
M; 
P: 
"D: 
P: 



13 



14 



B: 
P: 

M: 
P: 
ID: 

IP: 



15 



16 



B: 
M 
-D: 



17 



B: 
D: 



18 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



19 



B: 
D: 



20 



B: 

M 

-D: 



21 



22 



B^ 
M: 
-D: 



23 



B: 
D: 



24 



B: 
M: 
^D: 



25 



B: 
D: 



26 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



27 



B: 
D: 



28 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



29 



B: 
D: 



30 



B: 
M: 

Jd: 



31 



B: 

D: 



Chart no. 15 



15 



16 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 16 on chart no. 10 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 4 |_azarus Grover 



Chart no. 16 



16 Thomas Grover 



8 Stephen Grover 



B:1543 BEPSC 

P: .England 

M: 17 Nov 1566 

P: Hundridge, Bucks, England 

D: 3 Apr 1617 

P: Chesham, Bucks, Eng 18 



B: 22 Apr 1520 
Ivt1537 
D:Jan 1579 



BE S 



17 Elizabeth Mrs 



2 Thomas Grover 



B: 26 Nov 1615 BEPSC 

P: Chesham, Bucks.England 

M:1640 

P: Maiden, Middlesex, MA 

D:28 Oct 1661 

P: Maiden, M.Massachusetts 



C:2 Feb 1575/1576 BEPSC 

P: Chesham, Bucks, England 

M: 12 Dec 1611 

P: London.Eng 9 Elizabeth Chase 

D: Mar 1648 

P: Aldenham, H.England 



B:1516 
D:Jan 1598 

Thomas Chase 



BE S 



C:29 May 1547 BEPSC 

P: Hundridge, Bucks, Eng 
D:Jun 1579 
P: Chesham, Bucks, Eng 



B: 22 Apr 1520 
M:1539 
-D:29 Jun1586 



BEpSc 



10 



5 Godsgrace King 



B:1580 BE SC 

P: .England 

D: Mar 1641 

P: Aldenham, Herts, England •] -j 



1 Mathew Grover 



B:1650 BEPSC 

P: Boston, S.Massachusetts 

M:1673 

P: PB, Suffolk, Massachusetts 

D: 1679/1680 

P: .Middlesex, Massachusetts 



12 



Mary Davis 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



3 Elizabeth Smith 



B:1618 BE SC 

P: OC.MC, Massachusetts 
D: Oct 1676 
P: Maiden, M.Massachusetts 



13 



14 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



15 



19 



EBOWCHIEW(BOWCHI 
B:1518 BE Sc 

D: 2 Oct 1569 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



B: 
M: 
-D: 



25 



B: 
D: 



26 



27 



B: 
D: 



28 



M 
■ID: 



29 



B: 
D: 



30 



B: 

M. 

-ID: 



31 



B: 
D: 



Pedigree Chart 

No. 1 on this chart is the same as no. 16 on chart no. 12 

Completed Ordinances: 

B Baptized 

E Endowed 

P Sealed to parents 

S Sealed to spouse 

C Children's ordinances 



Chart no. 42 



16 Thomas NICKERSON 



8 Thomas NICKERSON 



4 William NICKERSON 

B: 15 Dec 1571 BEPSC 

P: Permontergate,N,N,Eng 

M: 

P: Norwich, Norfolk, Eng g 

D: Aft 1621 

P: England 



2 William NICKERSON 



B: 16 Oct 1604 BEPS 

P: Norwich, Norfolk, England 
M: 1627/1630 
P: England 
D:8Sep 1690 
P: CM, Mass. 



B:1542 BEPSC 

P: Norwich 
M: 26 Mar 1567 
P: .Norwich, Eng 
D:6Jun1596 
P:SP,Norwich,England 18 

Alice 

B:26 Mar 1567 BE SC 

P: Norwich 

D:6Jun 1596 

P: SP, Norwich, England 



B:1515 
NM542 
-D: 25 Feb 1584 



BE SC 



17 Margaret RUDD 



B:1520 
D: 



BE SC 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



19 



B: 
D: 



20 



10 



5 Alice 



B:Abt 1578 BE SC 

P: Norwich, Norfolk, Eng 
D: 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



21 



B: 
D: 



22 



11 



1 Nicholas NICKERSON 

B: 10 Aug 1628 BEPSC 

P: Norwich, Norfolk, England 

M:1655 

P: S.B.Massachusetts 

D: 

P: Yarmouth, Barnstable, MA 



12 Nicholas BUSBY 



23 



B: 
D: 

24 John BUSBY 



Mary DERBY 

(Spouse of no. 1 ) 



6 Nicholas BUSBY 



3 Anne BUSBY 



B: 1607/1608 BEPS 

P: Norwich, Norfolk, Eng. 
D: 18 May 1686 
P: CM, Mass. 



B:1546 

P: .Engl 

M 

P:,Engl 

D: 17 Jun1615 

P: .Norfolk, England 



BEPSC 



B:1519 
M 
-D:22 Sep 1568 



BE 



25Tbd 



B:Abt 1523 
D: 



BE 



B:1 Jan 1590 BEPSC 

P: Of Norwich, N.England 

M:24Jun 1605 

P: SMC, Norwich, N.England 13 Susannah 

D: 28 Aug 1657 

P:Boston,Suffolk,MA 



26 



B:1548 

P:,Engl 

D: 

P: Norfolk, England 



BE SC 



B: 

M: 
-D: 



27 



B: 
D: 



28 



14 Christopher COCKE 



7 Bridget COCKE 



B:1558 BE SC 

P : Coslaney , N , N .England ^ 

Nt25 Jan 1579 

P: SMC, Norwich, N.England 

D: 



Prepared by 
Joan Nykamp 
14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls, ID 83401 

USA 



Telephone 
208-523-7378 



Date prepared 
27 Mar 2006 



B:1584 BEPSC 

P:OfNorwich,Norfolk,Engl P: 

D:20 May 1659 

P:Boston,Suffoik,MA 15 Margaret Allen 



30 



B:1560 BE SC 

P: Coslaney. N.N.England 
D: 
P: 



B: 
M 
D: 



31 



B: 
D: 



17 



OUR ANCESTORS WHO EMIGRATED TO AMERICA 



Name 



Native Land 



William Nickerson England 

Ann Busby England 

Thomas Grover England 

Elizabeth Smith England 



Robert Weekes 



England 



Mary Ann Bauldry England 

Sidney Weekes England 

Susan Pilgrim England 

Robert Orr Scotland 

Elizabeth McQueen Ireland 

Thomas Orr Scotland 



Christina Bennett 



Isabella Orr 



Scotland 



Scotland 



Date Emigrated 
June 20, 1637 
June 20, 1637 
About 1638 
About 1638 
Feb. 20, 1853 
Feb. 20, 1853 
Feb. 29, 1853 
June 4, 1863 
Spring 1853 
Spring 1853 
Spring 1855 
Spring 1855 
Spring 1855 



Age 

33 

28 

23 

20 

63 

54 



12 



27 



51 



24 



Ship 

John & Dorothy 

John & Dorothy 



International 



International 



International 



Amazon 



Falcon 



47 Falcon 

26 Charles Buck 



Charles Buck 



Charles Buck 



We appreciate the desire, courage and fortitude of our beloved pioneer ancestors, who 
gave their all for the sake of the Gospel. How grateful we are that they came to this blessed land 
of America that we might enjoy the choice blessings that are ours. They left comfortable homes 
and loved ones whom they'd never see again. 

Many saints suffered much from sickness, some lost their lives, one of which was Robert 
Weekes, age 63. He passed away on the plains near Fort Laramie. His son Benjamin, seventeen 
years old, was drowned in the Platte River. 

Our ancestors listed above, crossed the ocean in sailing vessels. The voyage took five or 
six weeks. Dangerous and severe storms were often encountered. Many ships were saved from 
destruction and lives were saved through the prayers of the passengers. Brother Harrison 
Burgess tells of an experience he had while crossing the ocean. He was a missionary in England 
in 1850. It is a fulfillment of the Lord's promise that many who traveled by water to Zion in the 
last days should not perish, but rather be protected by Him. 



18 




19 



20 



John Samuel 
Weekes 



& 



Ida Isabelle Grover 



Family 



2&3 



21 



22 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband John Samuel WEEKES 



Bom 



_8 Sep 1873 



Chr 
Died 
Buried 



22_Apr1956_ 
25 Apr 1956 



Place SMITHFIELD, Cache, Utah 

Place 



Place SUNNYDELLJVIadison, Idaho 

Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison. Idaho 



LDS ordinance dates 



Baptized 
Endowed 
SealPar 



JLSep 1881 
21 Oct 1896 
21 Oct 1896 



Temple 



LOGAN 



Mamed 20 Nov 1894 | Place Lyman, Fremont. Idaho 



SeaISp 



21 Oct 1896 ! LOGAN 



Husband's father 
Husband's mother 



Sidney WEEKES 

Susan Elizabeth PILGRIM 



Wife 



Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVER 



Bom 
Chr. 



13 Apr 1874 



Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 

Place 



iDied 



1 Buned 



15Jun1942 
18Jun1942 



Place Sunnydell, Madison, Idaho, 



Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 



LDS ordinance dates 
Baptized 29 Jul 1882 



Endowed 



SealPar 



21 Oc t 1896 
BIC 



Temple 



LOGAN 



Wife's father 
Wife's mother 



Marshall Hubbard GROVER 
Isabelle ORR 



Children List each child in order of birth. 



LDS ordinance 



Temple 



1 m Marshall Leslie WEEKES 



Bom 



16 Nov 1895 



Chr. 



Died 



2 Dec 1918 



Buried 



Place Sunny dell, Fremont, Idaho 



Place 



pjace Camp_Kearny, Californi a 

Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 



Baptized 5 Jun 1 90 4 j 

Endowed 26 Mar 1919! LOGAN 
SealPar 2 1 Oct 1 896 LOGAN 



Spouse 

Married 



unmarried 

n 



Place 



SeaISp 



Susan Isabel WEEKES 



Bom 



18 Apr 1898 



Chr. 
Died 



Buried 



8 Nov 1953 
12 Nov 1953 



Place Sunnydell, Fremont (Now Madison^ Idaho 

Place 



Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 

Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison. Idaho 



Baptized 
Endowed 



SealPar 



"LJul 19_06 

4 Jan 1918 

BIC 



IFALL 



Spouse 
Married 



George Francis NELSON 



6 Feb 1 929 ] Place LO GAN, C ache, Utah, USA 



SeaISp 



6 Feb 1929! LOGAN 



Spouse 



John JENSEN 



Married 
Spouse 

Married 



3 Apr 1925JP11 Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
George FrancjsN ELSON 



SeaISp 



3 Apr 1925 I SLAKE 



Place 



SeaISp 



M 



William Lyman WEEKES 



Bom 



Chr. 



iDied 



2 May 1900 | Place Sunn ydell, Fremont, Idaho 

Pl ace 

Place Su nnyde ll, Madison, Idaho 



12 Jan 1917 



Buried 



Baptized 



Endowed 



SealPar 



3 Jul 1908; 
lFeb1917j 

BicT 



LOGAN 



Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison. Idaho 



Spouse 



unmarried 



Married 



Place 



SeaISp 



F Bertha Rebecca WEEKES 



Bom 
Chr. 



Died 



28 Mar 1903 j Place Sun nydell, Fremont, Idaho 



Buried 



Place 

29 Apr 1 99_5|Ptece Provo, Utah , Utah 

6 May 19951 Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison. Idaho 



Baptized 4Aug1911_ 



Endowed 30 Aug 1923 

SealPar BIC 



SLAKE 



Spouse 
Married 



Olin Henry JEPPSON 



30 Aug 1923 I Place Salt Lake City. Salt Lake. Utah. USA 



Iseatsp 30 Aug 1923! SLAKE 



Maude Christina WEEKES 



Bom 



Chr. 



4 Nov 19 4 I Place Sunnydell, Freemont, Idaho 
4 Dec 1904 t Place Archer Ward, Freemont, Idaho 



Died 



5 Dec 19 93 | Pla ce Archer^ Madison, Idaho 



Buned 9 Dec 1993 i Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 



Baptized 18JuM9_13_ 

Endowed 23May 1928 

SealPar BIC 



LOGAN 



spouse Gerald JeppaJEPPSON 

Married 23 May 1928 ; Place Logan. Cache. Utah 



I seatsp 23 May 1 928 ! LOGAN 



M 



John Samuel WEEKES JR. 



Bom 
Chr. 



Died 
Buried 



_24 Sep 1906 [Place Sunnydell, Fre mon t, Idaho 

Pjace 

14 Oct 1906 I Place 



Baptized 



Endowed 
SealPar 



Infant 
Infant 

bic; 



Prepared by 
Phone 



Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison. Idaho 



Carl Nykamp 
_208-523-7378 



E-maii address carl@srv. my rf.net 

Date prepared 8 Apr 2QQ6_. 



Address 



14054 
Idaho 
Idaho 



N65E 
Falls 



83401 USA 



23 











Family Group Record 






Page 2 of 2 


Husband 


John Samuel WEEKES 










Wife 


Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVER 










Children 


List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


6 


M 


John Samuel WEEKES JR. 






Spouse 


unmarried 










Married 


j Place 


SeaISp 






7 


M 


Robert Ursel WEEKES 




Bom 


7 Sep 1907 j Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


4Auq1916 




! 


Chr. 


J Place 


Endowed 


12 Mar 1930 


SLAKE 




Died 


30 Jul 1988 | Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


l Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 










Spouse 


unmarried 












Married 


TPIace 


SeaISp 






8 


F 


Nora 


Opal WEEKES 












Bom 


17 Jan 1910 ! Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jul 1918 








Chr. 


j Place 


Endowed 


31 May 1940 


SLAKE 




Died 


1 May 1994 i Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


5 May 1994 I Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 










Spouse 


Cecil Keith CLEMENTS 








9 




Married 


10 Dec 1941 I Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake. Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


10 Dec 1941 


SLAKE 


F | 










Bom 


7 Oct 1912 Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


16 Jul 1921 






Chr. 


1 Dec 1912 Place Sunnydell, Freemont, Idaho 


Endowed 


9Auq 1939 


SLAKE 




Died 


31 Jul 1999 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


7 Aua 1999 I Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 












Spouse 


Lynn Leroy RANDALL 










Married 


9 Aua 1939 i Place Salt Lake City. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


9 Aua 1939 


SLAKE 


10 


F 


Afta Grace WEEKES 






Bom 


3 Jul 1914 


place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


5Auq1922 




j 


Chr. 




Place 


Endowed 


18 Jul 1947 


IFALL 




Died 


30 Dec 1993 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


3 Jan 1994 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 


! 


Spouse 


Everett Charles BRINDLE 








11 




Married 


25 Jul 1947 ! Place Pocatello. Bannock. Idaho. USA 


SeaISp 


30 Dec 1957 


IFALL 


F 


Madonna WEEKES 




Bom 


5 Feb 1919 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Feb 1927 






Chr 


6 Apr 1919 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


12 Mar 1941 


SLAKE 


i 


Died 


4 Sep 1995 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




I 


Buried 


8 Sep 1995 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 










Spouse 


Newell Augustus PIQUET 












Married 


12 Mar 1941 I Place Salt Lake City. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


12Mar1941 n 


SLAKE 



24 




<t "^ >*•. 



£j*>* W . -Wi 



. A ■ . -• 



John Samuel and Ida Isabel Grover Weekes 



25 




Ida Isabel Grover 




Ida Isabel Grover 





Ida Isabel Grover Weeks 



Ida Isabel Grover 



26 




Standing L-R: Opal, Ursel, Maude, Bertha 
Front: Isabel, Ida Isabel, Alta (lap), John Samuel Weekes, Eldora, Leslie 




1912 Newly buiLt home of John Samuel and Ida Isabel Weekes 



27 




John Samuel Weekes 
Right: John, Leslie, Ida holding 
Isabel. Below Left: Ida, John with 
Jerry, Peter and Kay Jeppson. 
Right: John holding Darlene Piquet 








Top left: Brothers John Samuel & William 
Henry Weekes. Top right: Leslie Weekes & 
cousin Charles Weekes. 
Below left back: Opal. Front: Alta, Madonna, 
& Rldora Weekes. Below right back Isabel & 
Maude. Front: Opal, Alta & Eldora Weekes 




29 



^ m 



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'▼r» 



^e^ 




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!£& 



John & Ida Weekes Family 
Back: Bertha, Ursel, Opal, Madonna, Ida, Alia, John, Maude, Eldora, George Nelson 
Middle: Ross Weekes, Nilo Jeppson, Isabel 
Front: Zula & Glenna Nelson, Marjorie Jeppson 




Back entrance of John & Ida Weekes home in Sunnydell, Idaho 

Built in 1912 



30 



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32 





33 



JOHN AND IDA GROVER WEEKES 

I remember that Mother used to wear a long apron gathered on a band at her waist. That 
apron was a part of Mother as long as I can remember. Her skirts were always ankle length. 
Although Mother helped Father outside a lot, she seldom wore overalls. It seemed Mother was 
helping if it was irrigating potatoes, fixing fences, repairing machinery - Mother was there. 

Her apron served many purposes. If she gathered eggs they were carried in her apron. 
Sometimes an old hen needed to be moved and she was covered with the apron. Baby chicks 
were transported in her apron. Wood and chips were carried in her apron. No modern apron 
could be as useful as Mother* s was in her day. 

I remember very well the time they took Bessie Wilcox, Mother and her elderly 
grandmother to the hills. They found extra good berries. They went up Monday or Tuesday and 
generally came back Friday night so berries could be taken care of on Saturday. Maude and I 
had stayed home with the younger children and we had cleaned the house so good and waited 
and waited even on Saturday. Finally, near dark here they came, everything full of berries. They 
had found extra big, thick berries. Mother said there were sheep trails along the side of the 
mountain and the berries were so big and thick the bushes drooped over into the sheep trail. The 
grub boxes were filled with berries. All cans and buckets were filled. Mother had taken her big 
full petticoat and filled it with berries. Her apron was tied full of berries. Our nice clean kitchen 
and porch soon looked very full of berries. In all the years this was the biggest crop ever, I 
believe. The folks were so happy it turned out this way because Grandma Johnson had never 
seen the huckleberry hills before or after. 

The folks were always very hospitable. If someone came while we were eating, the folks 
always insisted on them eating with us. Seemed like we always had delicious apple pie. I have 
never been able to make it as good as Mother did, of course, she made many more than I did. 

Mother and Father loved to go after lumber and wood. They would take hay and bedding 
and food on the running gears of the wagon and go for a day or two. One time when they were 
getting lumber from the old barn that Everett tore down, a bull gave them some company. Ursel 
said a bull came right up and stuck his head in the tent while they were huckleberrying. 

I need to tell you about the times when we first went up into Kelly Canyon. When 
Grandma and Grandpa Grover went with us, we generally went on Windy Ridge for 
huckleberrys, but years later when the Ike Nelsons" went with us we went to Kelly Canyon. The 
road along the hills was not leveled. Sometimes Father would stand on the upper side of the 
buggy to keep it from tipping over. Father would stand on the upper side and Mother would 
drive. There were no bridges over the creeks and all in all it was a very scary ride for us kids. 
Sometimes we even cried but Mother and Father never seemed to worry about it. 

When we got so we went into Balsam Grove and Hells Hole, we would take Old Joe to 
scout and find berries and then carry the small children on his back to the patch. The roads then 
just went along the bottom of the canyon and sometimes we picked a mile away from camp. It 
was quite a task to carry the berries back to camp. We always took our ten-gallon milk cans and 
always seemed to get them full. The berries were picked over by the campfire and poured into 
the cans and the cans were put into the creek so they were kept cold. 

The folks seldom had any other outings besides huckleberrying. Mother would cook 
such good potatoes with onions in the dutch oven. She even made baking powder biscuits and 
cooked them in the dutch oven. Of course we always got a few ashes but that made them taste 



35 



better. Bacon and eggs never tasted as good at home as they did in the hills. Sometimes she 
made fudge. 

Big bonfires were made in the evening and sometimes we would play hide and seek or 
kick the can. Sometimes it was talking and singing by the group. It seemed like two or three 
families camped close together so there was quite a crowd. Some of the horses were hobbled at 
night to conserve hay. Once in a while they would wander off and that always made me nervous. 

Mother could cook for a crew of threshers of 20 or 30 men, when the grain was hauled 
from the field, and never go to town. She didn't have a freezer either, but she did have cured 
bacon and ham. Lard was rendered out and vegetables bottled by cooking them four hours in the 
boiler, and fruit bottled or fresh. 

There were plenty of eggs, milk and cream. I never remember a time when we didn't 
have milk, eggs, meat, fruit, etc. There was always a big garden with raspberries, currants (red, 
white and stinkbug), gooseberries, strawberries and apples. 

I can remember Mother filling large 5 gallon jars with preserved sweet prunes they got 
from Cheney's. We would take our bowl down the cellar, where Alta and Everett now have the 
wood shed, and with a cup or big spoon, fill it with preserves. Mother preserved peeled 
watermelon rinds, tomatoes, apples and plums. That was to make a variety. It wasn't as easy to 
get peaches and cherries, then as now. I never remember having apricots. Still we had plenty 
and to spare. 

The only time I remember Mother getting impatient with me was when she was cooking 
for threshers. She was making a cake and I kept sticking my fingers in the dough and getting 
some to eat. She spoke to me a time or two but it tasted so good I couldn't hear. Finally she 
took her spoon and hit the back of my hand. The edge was sharp and it cut through the skin and 
started to bleed. Then she felt bad, but I didn't pick in any more. I carried the inch scar on my 
left hand forever after. 

Father and Mother were very patient. Sometimes I wondered how they ever put up with 
me, especially Father, when I worked outside. I remember crossing the canal without a bridge. 
There were willows on the banks and I forgot to raise the mower knife. Of course, I broke it off. 
I wasn't scolded as I can remember. So many times and in so many ways they were patient and 
kind. They always worked long and hard. We always had the best there was for the time and 
conditions. 

Few people had gas lights in the ceiling like we did. Our gas tank was upstairs and ran in 
brass tubes to the kitchen and dining room. We also had gas lamps and lanterns. We had 
running water in our house from 1917 because we had a Delco. Then we had electric lights, 
washer and iron. What a joy! I can remember our first washer was a round brass tub with cups 
that went up and down in the water. There were holes in the tub and they were spun dry. 

It was a real trial to me when I got married because we didn't have water in the house 
until after Olin died. 

Father was on the committee that was responsible for getting the electric line up our way 
in about 1930. Of course that was much easier then to keep the gasoline engine going to make 
electricity for our Delco system. 

One time Mr. Wilford Jensen stopped by to see Father. He was invited to eat dinner. He 
did and soon excused himself saying his wife was waiting for him in the car. All callers were 
invited to have a meal. Had they known Mrs. Jensen was there, she would have eaten too. 

Mother was very particular that we have clean bodies and underwear, and that our shoes 
were polished. She always had clean clothes for us too. I tried so hard to stay out of school and 



36 



help her wash, when Madonna was small, but she wouldn't let me. I then went to the teacher to 
get him to let me stay out and help. I see now why he didn't say yes. Had Mother given her 
permission, he would have done. Father often hung the clothes on the line to help. There were 
no dryers then. 

Mother always had chickens and generally eggs to sell. We milked several cows 8 or 10. 
The milk was separated and the cream sold. The skim milk was fed to the cows, chickens and 
pigs. We would take the cream to town, where Keith Clement's Grandmother had a cream 
station. She would test it for butter fat and give us a check. We bought our groceries with the 
money. She would put the cream on the train and it was taken to Salt Lake, I think, to be made 
into butter. In later years we sold milk each day. It was hauled down to the old rock school 
house by Henry's store and made into cheese. It was hauled with horses for years. 

Mother helped with the finances by raising "bum" lambs. In those days sheepmen had 2 
or 3 thousand head of sheep. During lambing, when twins or triplets were born, or the ewe died 
or would not claim her lamb, these lambs were given away. Maude and I used to go down to 
Spauldings in Burton to get them. We would fasten all the curtains on the white-top buggy down 
tight and drive down there to get the lambs. I don't remember how we knew where to go. I 
guess Mother or Father went with us the first time to show us where to go. Then we put nipples 
on bottles and fed them until they were older and we could teach them to drink from a pan or 
bucket. Sometimes we would raise 20 or 30 lambs this way. 

For a few years we had a small herd of sheep that were branded and sent out on the range 
with men who had large herds. Then we fed them at home during the rest of the year. 

There were always plenty of chores for everyone: 8, or 10 horses to feed, water, curry 
and harness, cows to be milked, pigs, chickens and sheep to be fed, milk to separate, and calves 
to feed. All of this took place before we had breakfast. As I look back I wonder how the routine 
was established to make it work as a whole. I can't remember anyone finding fault or not being 
willing to help especially as I got older and went to high school. Not every family had that many 
chores. Lots of people bought eggs, butter and meat as they do now, or went without. How 
thankful I am for my heritage. 

I cannot remember a period of time when we did not gather for morning prayer before 
breakfast and again at night before we went to bed. When I was at home we didn't have as many 
forces to pull us away from home and prayers at night or morning as there are today. We lived 
and worked and prayed together every day. Maybe one person would be away at night, but not 
often. 

As a small child I can remember the prayer or administration when some of us were sick. 
Brother Christensen lived where we now live. Father got our place from him. He would walk up 
through the field and bring a small sack of round peppermint candies and he often helped Father 
in administering to us. Also Grandfather, Sidney Weekes, was close and he came. When Father 
or the boys had a priesthood assignment, someone else did their chores while they went on their 
assignment. Priesthood assignments always came first in our home. Father always went ward 
teaching. Church attendance was not regular when the Church house was down near Terry's 
store. It was so far and there were always chores and getting the team ready. It took much 
united effort to make it there. However, when the new rock church was built where the red brick 
one is now, we always went to all of the meetings. I can't remember Mother ever going to 
Sunday School except for a Mother's Day program. She always had clean clothes for us to go. 
A good dinner was prepared and we generally had one or more extra people for Sunday dinner, 
often a whole family. There always seemed to be plenty. Now when I cook for Ursel and I. I 



37 



seldom cook extra, as there is no one to eat the surplus for the next meal. Often when we came 
home. Mother would be sitting in the rocking chair in the dining room reading either the Book of 
Monnon or the Bible. She was well versed in the scriptures. Although Mother had little formal 
education, she did go as far as the fifth McGuffey Reader. She was a good reader and writer and 
had more practical education in arithmetic than any of us children. It didn't take her long to 
figure how many tons of hay in a stack, if she knew how long and tall and wide. She could do 
the same with a load of hay. She could tell how many bushels of wheat in a bin, too. Her 
education was very good. Father did not ever go to school. He was taken from his mother, who 
died, at an early age and brought to Idaho, where formal schooling wasn't held until he was old 
enough to help with the chores and farm work. That was important then. Mother did not come 
to Idaho so early. Of course, Mother went to school in Lyman to Mr. Ensley Atkinson. We 
know that because I have a book given to Mother and autographed by Mr. Atkinson, her teacher. 
I don't know why it was awarded, but I believe it was because she was an outstanding student. 

Mother was an outstanding seamstress. She made tailored suits for the boys and did all 
of our sewing. I never remember Mother using a pattern from the store like we do today. She 
would get the Sears Catalogue and look through the dresses for the one she wanted. Then she 
took a piece of newspaper and started to cut her pattern. I couldn't cut them like mother did. I 
remember a little coat she cut for me when Nilo was a little boy and for Marjorie a little blue 
coat. 

There is a funny incident that happened with Mother and Aunt Lou Weekes, our 
neighbor. Father was using all of our horses that were home. In early summer we took extra 
horses up to eat on the range, leaving barely enough for the work. Our little black pony, Old Joe, 
was available. Aunt Lou could take a big, slow white horse. The two were hitched to the white- 
top buggy. At the signal to start Joe pushed forward. It seemed like he would go through his 
collar, he was so much smaller than the work-horse, whose collar he wore. The big white horse 
settled back, his single tree rubbed the wheel, and then he ambled off. That is the way they 
traveled all the way to town. It made a good laugh for anyone who saw them. The lively little 
black pony was as far ahead as he could to and the big white horse was hanging back as far as he 
could. They got home okay but they never tried that team again. 

We always had lilacs, yellow and pink roses, peonies, tulips, old man and woman (two 
green fragrant flowers used just to smell) and bergamont. I have the lovely pink tulips Mother 
gave me 56 years ago. They are still tall and beautiful in color and size. I also got small trees 
and bushes from home. I was always proud of our home and yard. 

I can remember Mother and Father going to dances in the old log church. Everyone 
went. There was a stage up 2 or 3 feet higher than the floor. Here the small children were laid 
down on the big chairs in quilts to sleep, while the older folks danced. I don't remember of ever 
having baby sitters. We went along occasionally when the folks went out. Both Mother and 
Father liked music. Mother often sang at her work. Songs I remember are: Oh Grave where is 
Thy Victory , Oh Death Where is Thy Sting and Oh Where is My Wandering Boy Tonight . 
Mother had an Uncle Johnny Orr who was wayward. I thought that was why she sang that one. 
Once in a while she would whistle. We always had the organ that Joyce had fixed up. When 
Maude and I went to High School they took that for us to practice on. Then when our pieces 
went beyond the organ keyboard, they a bought a piano. All of us were given lessons. I started 
when I was young. I rode Old Joe down to Sister Myrtle Pratt for my first lesson. 



38 



Father always encouraged us to sing around the organ. He tried to get me to sing but I 
couldn't sing when I played. His favorite song was Sometime Well Understand . He didn't sing 
out, it was more like humming. 

When it was cold, Father would take us to school, up at Sunnydell, on a couple of horses, 
with 2 or 3 on each horse. When we went to Archer we either walked or drove a team. In the 
winter they were put in a barn that was there for the horses or tied to the sleigh to eat hay. 

Education was important to the folks. We were never allowed to stay out, although I 
worked on the farm driving the team for everything from plowing to hauling hay. When I 
graduated and needed to go to summer school so I could teach school, I was encouraged to do it 
and the folks paid for my room. I took food from home. They usually came and got us on 
Friday night and brought us back to Rexburg on Sunday afternoons. We batched it all during 
high school as well as summer school. As I look back I wonder how they made that trip twice 
each week with the horses and got the rest of the chores done on Sunday. It was always done 
with gladness and no complaint. 

We all started teaching in Sunday School and Primary from the time we were fourteen 
years old. I never got beyond the second intermediate class in Sunday School because I was 
teaching. We never missed a Sunday unless we had a contagious disease at home. Our work at 
home was always secondary to our work in the Church. 

Father always attended tithing settlement. If he hadn't paid enough during the year and 
had no money, I have known him to borrow money to finish paying his tithing at the end of the 
year. All the children were not invited to pay or attend tithing settlement. However, we knew 
the value of tithe paying and all the family have carried on paying tithing in their adult lives. I 
think that was a precious trait to have learned as a child. I remember at Mother's funeral the 
speakers mentioned many times, by their fruits ye shall know them. Now thirty seven years 
later, Bishop Ray Smith, who is 93 years old was Bishop then, says that the John Weekes family 
always supported me 100 percent, and no matter what I asked for as a Bishop. A high tribute to 
our parents. 

The first car I remember was when I was 14. Father bought an Oldsmobile seven 
passenger. There were 2 seats behind the front seat that folded down in the floor until the back 
seat was full. Then these two seats were pulled up for the smaller ones to sit on. I never saw 
another car like that one. 

This was after the boys died. Father and Mother took us to town. Father came home 
some other way. I was shown how to start and shift gears and then turned loose to drive home. 
My first experience. Mother was there and gave moral support, but I was really frightened. I 
stopped at the big gate but I must not have put the brake on hard enough, because we rolled 
slowly into the big gate and it fell down. We didn't run over it. The gatepost was rotten. Here 
again, I was not scolded. The gate was repaired and I continued to drive with better results. 
Mother used to help clean the spark plugs and put oil in it, but she never did learn to drive a car. 

I say we had kind, patient, long suffering parents. Our parents were of a serious nature. I 
never heard a smutty story from Father or Mother. We always had the Church magazines. There 
was nothing of an obscene nature for us to look at or read. 

Mother spent many hours knitting stockings and mittens. Although she couldn't tat, she 
spent long hours helping me learn how. She taught us to crochet but never to knit. As a result I 
have never learned to knit. I did a pair of house slippers in a mini class, but would have to learn 
over again now. We lived in a clean orderly home. 



39 



Grandma Grover had an organ in their home. I cannot remember any of them learning to 
play on it, unless Uncle Elisha learned to chord. He always had a piano and loved to sing with 
his children. I can remember staying with Grandma Grover a few nights. I slept upstairs in a 
feather bed that always had lovely white pillowcases with wide crocheted lace. I was always a 
little scared at the experience. Grandma died when Madonna was 6 months old, so I wasn't very 
old when I stayed over night. I used to clip her toenails for her. 

An interesting incident as Father told me. I liked to work in the timber and did quite a lot 
of it. On one occasion, when we were moving down with our load, we had to go through a 
narrow canyon, only wide enough for the sleighs. As soon as we got through there was a snow 
slide about ten feet deep that filled the narrow canyon. Had we been 5 minutes longer getting 
out we would have all been buried. That night we dug a hole through the snow down to the 
ground to sleep on. The snow was even with our heads, 6 foot on the level. The roads were so 
filled that we got frantic. We walked out to the sawmill. There we found food and hay. The 
next morning we took some hay on our backs and walked back to the horses. They had eaten 
their halter ropes and each others tails off. It was a sorry sight. We hitched them up and drove 
them home without further trouble. This was interesting to me because now days people don't 
work in the timber very much after the snow comes. Just think how cold it would have been. I 
think it would have been anything but a pleasure trip. 

When I was married in 1927 in the Logan Temple, Mother went with us and was proxy 
for her own mother to be sealed to her parents, Thomas Orr and Christina Bennet Orr. Her 
mother had been sealed in the temple after she was born and she said she would not be sealed 
until her brother John was sealed. He was wayward and did not go through the temple. Mother 
was concerned about her mother's temple work and was grateful to get it done. 

Bertha Rebecca Weekes Jeppson 



40 



JOHN SAMUEL WEEKES 

John Samuel Weekes, second son of Sidney and Susan Pilgrim Weekes, was born in 
Smithfield, Utah, 8 September 1873. His parents were devout members of the LDS church, 
each having left their native homeland to come to America where they could worship as they 
chose. As parents they worked with their children. They taught them to be prayerful, 
industrious, and obedient. 

When a lad, John assisted in many ways in the yard and garden. Where their 
vegetables, especially large heads of cabbage, grew. Often they took blue ribbons at the state 
fair. With Old Blue, his faithful dog, he herded a community herd of cattle in the foothills 
east of Smithfield. In school, he sat on a rough hewed log and wrote on his small slate. 

When he was eleven years old, he told his mother goodbye and moved to Idaho with 
his father. (His father, Sidney, and mother, Susan, had decided to obey the law of plural 
marriage. In 1 884, it was decided that Susan would remain in their home in Smithfield and 
keep three of the children with her. Life in Idaho would be strenuous and John was needed to 
help clear the land and establish a new life in Idaho) This was sad indeed because he saw his 
mother very few times thereafter. She died 1 May 1888. (information in parentheses was 
added by Idonna Murray for clarification) 

When his father was sent to prison for plural marriage, much responsibility was 
placed upon his young shoulders. He assisted his older brother, George in every way to 
lighten the burden. They were indeed grateful when their father returned. At this time George 
and John moved into the cabin on the town site and batched. During his teens and early 
twenties, he spent much time in the canyon getting out posts and logs. They worked in late 
fall and winter after work on the farm was done. They took contracts to cut and deliver logs. 
The trees were sawed down, trimmed, and dragged to the bank of the Snake River; rolled in 
and floated downstream to a point near their home, taken out and delivered. It was while 
making a delivery to Marshall Grover that he met Marshall's daughter, Ida; his bride-to-be. 
John was gifted with ability, ambition, and a pleasing personality that appealed to Ida. They 
met at bonfire parties in the evenings when sage was burned. They attended dances and 
parties in people's homes. All of their friends joined in the fun. John and Ida both enjoyed 
riding horses. Ida had an excellent pony and rode very well in the sidesaddle. She was keen 
competition for John or any of his friends in races. 

As months flew by, John continued to gain favor in Ida's sight. He was successful in 
eliminating other rivals. When he won first place in her heart, the evening was one of 
supreme happiness. On November 20, 1894 he placed a band of gold on her finger and she in 
turn gave her promise to be true to him. Bishop Sam Wilcox married them at his house in 
Lyman. After their marriage they returned to Ida's home to enjoy a delicious wedding supper, 
prepared by her mother. Previous to their marriage, John had built a log house on ground he 
had helped homestead. They moved in and together worked hard, planning and saving money 
to buy a new wagon in which they and their baby, Leslie, traveled to the Logan Temple to be 
sealed for time and eternity, on 21 October 1896. 

Their life continued to be one of hard work and challenge, but as their family 
increased, they were able to enlarge their home and amply provide for them. John felt he had 
been richly blessed in the selection of his sweetheart and wife. Ida was indeed a helpmate, an 
excellent manager, cook and homemaker - a wonderful mother to their children whom she 
taught by example as well as precept. 



41 



As a result of cooperation, hard work, and sacrifice; the family was able to enjoy a 
lovely ten-room frame house in the year 1912. It was lighted by a central gas lighting system. 
In 1917, a Delco battery system was installed which provided power for lights, the pump, 
washer, iron and other conveniences. Their daughter, Alta, and her husband, Everett Brindle 
lived in this home for many years. 

On the 12th of January 1917, Lyman, age 17, passed away. Leslie passed away at the 
military base on 2 December 1918. The passing of these two sons brought extreme sadness 
and heartache as well as hardship to their loved ones. Ursel, one of the four sons, was left to 
help take care of the 135 acres of dry farm land. Additional land had been purchased in the 
interest of their sons. Willingly, the girls assumed responsibility and life moved on. 

The Church always played an important part in John and Ida's lives. Faith and prayer 
were manifest daily. They experienced many sweet experiences of healing through 
priesthood administrations in the lives of their family. They were active in the Church and 
attended faithfully. They were full tithe payers, gave freely of their time and means to assist 
with worthy community projects. They found joy in the service of their God and fellowmen. 
They provided an education for their family, a mission for three of their children and helped 
support many other missionaries. 

John served on the building committee for the rock chapel erected in the Archer 
Ward. He gave freely of his time and means for each chapel erected in the stake, the Rexburg 
Stake Tabernacle, and buildings on the Ricks College campus. He was one of the first men 
interested and was instrumental in getting the power line extended into the Archer and 
Sunnydell areas. 

Sadness came into John's life in April of 1942, with the serious illness of his dear 
companion. She passed away 15 June 1942 and was laid to rest in the Archer Cemetery. 

The remainder of John's life was spent in the homes of his children, where he was 
loved and welcomed. He enjoyed the great outdoors and the beauties of nature. Traveling 
with his children always brought joy to him. He enjoyed and spent much time serving in the 
temple. He loved to visit his many friends, especially the sick and homebound. 

After a lingering illness, he slipped quietly away; April 22, 1956. He was laid to rest 
in the Archer Cemetery, April 25 1956. His wife, Ida; three sons, Leslie, Lyman and John 
Samuel and eldest daughter, Isabel proceeded him in death. The following daughters and son 
survived him: Bertha (Mrs. Olin Jeppson), Ursel, Maude (Mrs. Gerald Jeppson: Opal (Mrs. 
Keith Clements; Eldora (Mrs. Lynn Randall); Alta (Mrs. Everett Brindle); Madonna 
(Mrs. Newell Piquet) - also 30 grandchildren, 92 great-grandchildren, and four great- 
great grandchildren. 

Written By Maude W. Jeppson 



42 



JOHN SAMUEL AND IDA GROVER WEEKES 

John Weekes and Ida Grover came to Archer as children in 1884. They came from 
Utah, a trip of over a week, in iron-tired wagons drawn by horses and oxen. They crossed the 
Snake River below the present site of the Lorenzo Bridge. Both the Weekes and Grovers 
lived in two or three roomed log houses made with dirt roofs. The Weekes home had inside 
partitions made in a factory. They were movable, so when Mother cleaned and whitewashed 
the walls she could move the partition and thus change the locations of the rooms. Being 
among the first to enter the area, they homesteaded large farms of primitive land. The ground 
was uneven, covered with sagebrush, willows and trees. They were pioneers in very deed as 
they cleared the land, leveled it, made canals and ditches, fences and roads. 

Each fall they would make a trip to Utah, taking what surplus food they could raise 
and exchange it for needed supplies, as there were no stores here. My Grandmother Grover 
tells of having a large barrel of molasses in their home as the only sweetener. It was a real 
thrill to the children to have permission to make a batch of molasses candy. My Mother told 
me stories of the Indians coming each summer in wagons or topless buggies to the Archer 
area to spend a month or two camping in the coves above the present homes of Suttons and 
Squires. They would call at the various homes and ask for food. The Indians used to frighten 
me and I'd run and hide behind Mother. Your Grandpa Jeppson used to herd the community 
cowherd on the hills near where the Indians camped. He'd watch them catch woodchucks, 
squirrels, etc. They would dry and smoke the meat from these small animals for food. 

Nearly every pioneer father had shoe repair equipment and supplies to fix the families 
shoes, as the shoes had to last a long time so they didn't have to go barefoot. 

There weren't any schools for several years after the folks arrived, as a result, they 
received very little education. How we should prize the opportunity to get an education 
today, by working hard and taking advantage of every minute of time thus engaged. Your 
great-great grandfather, Sidney Weekes, was the first Bishop of the combined Archer and 
Lyman Wards. He'd go by horse back or wagon from where he lived, on the present site of 
the Clarence Weekes home, to the church down south of the present Terry Store. The roads 
were not like the ones we enjoy today. When I was born, November, 1904, Dad had a 
difficult time getting a midwife from Burton to assist with the birth. The ruts in the road were 
to the hubs on the buggy wheels. 

One of my very pleasant memories was walking the mile to school in Sunnydell, 
through the farm now owned by Maglebys. It was a large area of sagebrush and low foliage 
among which a variety of wild flowers grew. Each night in the spring as we returned from 
school, we'd gather bowls full of snipes, buttercups, yellow, purple and white pansies, and 
sego lilies, so fragrant and beautiful. I thrill today, as I recall this experience. I love it so. 

I was quite young when John Buckland bought the first car I'd seen. It was a big noisy 
Hupmobile. We'd hear it coming and run to the front fence and wait to get a glimpse of that 
fantastic thing as it seemingly whizzed past. 

In the fall we'd look forward to the horse powered or steam engine thresher coming to 
our home to thresh the years crop of grain. It would mean two or three days of hard work for 
everyone. Mother and we girls cooked loads and loads of good food to feed 1 5 to 20 men 
three meals a day with breakfast being at sunrise. What a time the children had watching the 
wheat, as it poured out of the spout and filled the sacks, and the straw as it billowed on to the 
new stack. The men stood on the stacks of wheat and threw grain into the machine. The 



43 



pulleys and belts always fascinated me as they moved the parts and the miracle was 
performed. Then we climbed on the sacks of grain and the wonderful new straw stacks. 

Soon after harvest, it was time to clean house, part of which consisted of pulling the 
tacks out of the homemade carpet and taking it to the line for a good beating to cleanse it. 
We'd remove the old straw from the floor, which had served as padding. The floor was 
mopped, perhaps a bit of paint applied to the mopboards, new straw piled high and the carpet 
replaced and tacked. It was fun walking on the carpet until the straw packed down again. 

My grandmother and my mother, for a long time even after I was born, washed in 
round galvanized washtubs placed on two chairs or a wash bench. They soaped and then 
scrubbed the clothes up and down on a metal washboard. All the water they used was drawn 
from a deep well and carried to the house where it was heated on a wood cook stove in an 
oval shaped metal boiler. I helped my sister do many a wash in this manner for our family of 
eleven children and two parents. During my teenage years Father got us a wooden washer 
that we children operated by pushing a handle back and forth to manipulate a dasher which 
moved the clothes through the water. Then a few years later we were delighted with a new 
launderette electric washer, as Dad had installed a new private Delco system whereby we 
made our own electricity, the first in the area. By this time, 1912, we had built a new home. 

Before we built the new house, our bathroom consisted of an out-door wooden 
building either set over a deep hole or the field irrigation ditch. It was scary to get up in the 
night and go to the outhouse, cold too. Our bath was taken in the washtub in the middle of 
the kitchen floor, using water heated on the kitchen stove. Several might be obliged to bathe 
in the same water. Our irons were heated on the kitchen stove summer and winter. 

The children in those good old days had plenty to do to keep them out of mischief. A 
common job was to gather pig weed or dandelion greens for family meals. We seven girls 
lost three brothers, leaving but one, to help Dad, so we were trained in the art of farming as 
well as house keeping. I'm so thankful that I was taught many arts by my parents. As a child, 
I herded the cattle along the ditch banks and in the street as well as west of the farm on a 
timber area that Dad owned. When we'd take the herd there we'd leave them until night then 
go retrieve them. If our particular bell chimed from over the Snake River West of Cheney's it 
meant a trip across the river to get them. This I always abhorred as my pony was small and I 
had to kneel in the saddle to keep from getting wet. 

I spent one summer in my teen years with four horses on a riding scraper, leveling the 
west forty. Another sweet memory is the odor of the clover and alfalfa, as I mowed the hay. 
The children, without fail, each night must gather chips for the morning fire as well as wood 
for Mother's use the next day. The old familiar wood box must be heaped high. We were glad 
when the day came that we could supplement some of it with a bucket or two of coal. 

Mother baked 1 to 12 loaves of bread every day or two, again in the warm old cook 
stove. We didn't have trouble keeping warm in the summer. We churned butter in a huge 
wooden churn for the family's use as well as some to be wrapped in parchment paper bearing 
Mother's name, to be sold at the store. This was a tedious job, but I can still recall, the sweet 
smell of that fine butter and taste that wonderful buttermilk. We milked several cows and 
would set the milk to cool in pans in the clean whitewashed cellar. Later we got a separator 
and how we abhorred washing that set of discs each morning. We had to turn the separator by 
hand and it took a good muscle to keep up the proper speed to separate the cream. This cream 
was put in 10-gallon cans and taken to town and sold. Some years we ran a white top buggy 
cream route through the neighborhood, gathering the cream to take into town, 12 miles away. 



44 



Before the day of refrigerators, we cooled some things in a box tacked on the north side of 
the house, with burlap hung over the front, which was kept wet with water all day. 

Each fall Dad did his butchering of beef and pork, then on the kitchen table, both he 
and Mother cut it up, made sausage, rendered the lard, made headcheese, put the hams in salt 
brine, made soap from the trimmings, and made that homemade mincemeat, a must for the 
Christmas pies. 

Our family always had family prayer morning and night. Sundays and evenings we'd 
gather around the organ or piano in the parlor and sing. Our family was very close knit and 
united. The family that works and prays together stays together, thankfully. 

Our winter sport was skating on the ice-covered canal west of the farm or riding a 
homemade toboggan or sled behind a horse. The main summer relaxation was the trip to the 
hills. We'd work like mad to get that week in the mountains. Going by wagon, buggy, and 
horseback, several families would take cans of homemade bread, cakes, cookies, etc., etc. 
and take off Monday and return Friday or Saturday, with the 10 gallon cans filled with 
huckleberries instead of bread. Nights were enjoyed by playing games, having programs, or 
making candy by the campfires before retiring to our beds in the tents. 

I cherish my pioneer heritage. I am so thankful that my Mother taught me how to 
clean the corners as well as the middle of the floor, to love work, to save precious time and 
commodities and to develop the talents I was blessed with. 

(This history was written by Maude Christina Weekes Jeppson for her granddaughter, Maria) 

The Cheney family lived down by the Snake River. It was during the summer and 
they slept with the windows open. A skunk infected with rabies got through the window 
during the night and bit one of the Cheney boys and he passed away. 

This poem refers to a time when Ida Isabelle Grover Weekes assisted those neighbors 
by making a suit of burial clothes for their son. The grateful mother, Florence Cheney, wrote 
the following poem. 








^Ao^- crJt&-i -bL4Jl4^ t s^jtn^ s*™*y Z^-e^V 

(J 

0>v^4. *W*UJ 'rfeTASl. yb-nMk^Lo^ c^rryVLa »«iv^ 
3 <y»x 




45 



JOHN SAMUEL & IDA GROVER WEEKES 

John Samuel Weeks, second son of Sidney Weekes and Susan Pilgrim was born 
in Smithfield, Utah on September 8, 1873. Ida was the second child of Marshall Grover 
and Isabel Orr, in a family of thirteen children. 

John's early years were happy years in Smithfield, Utah. At that time plural 
marriage was being practiced and his father asked his mother how she felt about plural 
marriage. She said, "Sidney, if the other principles of the Church are true that one is true 
also'\ Susan gave her permission for Sidney's second marriage. 

On the 4 th of October, 1878, Sidney married Annie Bennett Harris, a widow with 
two small daughters. Annie's husband had been killed while hauling logs from the 
canyon. Susan shared her home with Annie and her daughters. 

In the spring of 1883, Sidney moved his second wife, Annie, sons George and 
John, and daughter Rebecca to Idaho to establish a new home. 

John, a lad of ten years, remembered the day they left his mother and their home 
in Smithfield. His father drove one wagon and George the other. After they had gone a 
little way his father asked, "Where is your hat, John?" "I forgot it," John said. "We'll 
wait here while you go and get it," said his father. John returned to the house and found 
his mother weeping as though her heart would break. Sadly he returned with his hat to 
continue the journey northward. 

It was a long and tedious journey to Idaho. As they approached the Snake River 
near Pocatello, the animals were very thirsty, having been without water for sometime. 
The oxen began to run toward the river. George realized they would run right into the 
river to get a drink. He jumped off the wagon and began hitting the oxen nearest him in 
an attempt to turn them away from the river. The oxen were so thirsty that they failed to 
heed all attempts to turn them. As a last resort George hit the oxen so close to the eye 
that it turned away from the river. The wagon and the provisions were saved. 

One of John's first four jobs was to herd cows on the hill east of his home. He 
often did it without shoes. He found that prickly pear were a real menace. As he grew 
older he helped clear the land of sage so it could be cultivated. 

His father was arrested and sent to prison in North Dakota due to the laws on 
plural marriage. At that time the boys, George and John, assumed responsibility of 
caring for the family. They worked and worked hard. They were in very deed pioneers. 

We will turn now to the story of Ida's life. Marshall and Isabel Orr Grover were 
married December 11, 1871. They made their home in Grantsville, Utah. Their son, 
Marshall Thomas, was born December 1 1,1872. He lived only eight and Vi months and 
passed away. He was laid to rest in the Grantsville Cemetery. 

A beautiful baby girl, Ida Isabel, was born on April 13, 1873. She was the pride 
and joy of her parents. She had black hair that was inclined to curl and a cheery 
disposition. On April 5, 1876, a baby brother, Robert, was born. A sister and nine other 
brothers joined the family in later years. 

Ida's home in Grantsville was an adobe building with a shingle roof. It was better 
that most children had. 

In the spring of 1876, Marshall received a call from the U.S. Government asking 
him to serve as a supervisor for the Ute Indians at Grouse Creek in the north western part 
of the state of Utah. He was to teach the Indians and settle disputes. He accepted the call 



46 



and moved his family to Grouse Creek. They were welcomed by the Indians who were 
very friendly. A tribal leader, Indian Jack, was especially friendly to the family. Often 
the Indians came to the Grover home asking for food and Isabel supplied their demands, 
regardless of the time of night. 

When Ida was four years old she was seriously ill with scarlet fever. Infection 
gathered in her throat, causing a large swelling that interfered with her breathing. It 
became necessary to lance it. It was done at home with four of them holding her in 
position on a table while another with a very sharp pen knife opened the area to release 
the pus that had gathered. The process had to be repeated to clear the infection. Needless 
to say, countless prayers were offered for Ida's recovery. The scar from the incision 
remained on her neck as long as she lived. 

At the age of eight years, which was customary in that day, Ida entered school. 
She was alert and very well prepared. She enjoyed reading and arithmetic. Her ability in 
arithmetic proved most valuable later in life. Her skill exceeded that of her children who 
had college educations. As was the custom in her day, her formal education ended with 
the sixth grade. 

Marshall enjoyed his work with the Indians but had to seek additional work to 
provide for this growing family. Grouse Creek was dry and lacked sufficient moisture to 
produce a good crop. Marshall hauled to Tacoma, Nevada and returned with provisions. 
The trips required three or four days, which was unpleasant for the family. After due 
consideration, Marshall and Isabel decided it would be wise to move from Grouse Creek 
in order to provide a better living for the family. They decided to move to Idaho. 
William Beatie, a friend, helped them make arrangements to purchase a home in Lyman, 
Idaho. 

There was sadness as the time grew near for moving. It was hard to think of 
leaving both white and red friends. Ida had a special friend, young James Betridge. The 
Betridge family lived near the Grovers. It was a large family and Ida had often helped in 
their home. She was efficient and worked rapidly. The family all loved her, especially 
young James. His father was a shoe maker and had shop in his home. He had made 
shoes for Ida. One pair was of the finest black leather and stitched with white silk thread, 
high topped and buttoned. She was so proud of them. 

Plans to move were completed but the thought made Ida sad. Many tears were 
shed by both red and white friends. 

The long journey to Idaho was begun in July of 1 889. There was a covered 
wagon for Isabel, the small children and their special items. It was driven by Marshall. 
Another wagon and the stock were driven by Rob and Ida. Rob and Ida also rode their 
ponies. Ida rode side saddle and she loved riding her pony. They were in deed pioneers 
as they wended their way north through the sage brush covered land. Baby William was 
only four months old and there were seven other children. It was July and hot! 

As they came near Fort Hall they were greeted by Indians. Indian Jack of Grouse 
Creek had told his friends at Fort Hall about Marshall and his family. The Indians felt 
acquainted with the white Papa and his family. They begged to take Marshall's animals 
and herd them while the family rested and made arrangements to complete their journey. 

Marshall set a definite time for the return of the animals and let them go. It was a 
golden opportunity for Isabel and Ida. They made the best use of their time preparing for 
the rest of the journey. 



47 



At the appointed time the animals were returned in the finest condition. The 
family again traveled northward to their new home. When they reached the Snake River, 
Isabel and the children were very upset because there was no bridge, only a ferry. It was 
a crude structure without sides and only rope stretched from corner to corner. Wagons 
and the young stock were ferried across. Older stock were forced to swim across the 
river. The crossing of the swift moving water was made without incident, but not without 
much worry and anxiety. 

After crossing the river the family traveled northward to Burton, Idaho and the 
Beatie home. He had made arrangements to purchase the home. In the morning they 
traveled south to Lyman and their home with 1 60 acres of land. They were happy to 
complete their journey on July 26, 1889. 

They found a two-room log cabin which was to be their home until they could 
build something better. There was a shed, a well and a chicken coop. Trees had been 
planted. So much work would have to be done to make it home. 

Marshall and Isabel began by scrubbing and cleaning the house. They then 
painted the doors and window frames and made a ceiling with factory cloth that Isabel 
had brought from Utah. Homemade carpet covered the bedroom floor. The kitchen was 
scrubbed and kept clean. Their furniture consisted of four beds, a dresser, a table, a chair 
for each member of the family, three rocking chairs, a cook stove, a box heater, a 
cupboard and wash stand. Other pieces were purchased as needed. The home was clean, 
comfortable and cheery. 

Of the 160 acres of land belonging to Marshall and Isabel, only nine had been 
cleared. The rest was covered with sage brush, some of it five feet tall. When pulled, 
piled and dried it made beautiful bonfires. In the evening friends were invited in to enjoy 
the bonfires. It was also a way to make new friends. Removal of the sage brush was a 
tedious task but eventually it was completed and the ground was cultivated and planted. 

The school house and chapel were not too far away in a south westerly direction. 
However, at first, meetings were held in their home. John's father, Sidney Weekes, was 
the first presiding Elder and the first Bishop of the Lyman, Idaho Ward. 

Coal oil lamps lighted the homes, church and school house. Miss Phillips from 
Provo, Utah, was the first school teacher. She spent her summer vacation here in homes 
of the people and assisted with work that needed to be done. 

Ida completed her sixth grade of school. In that day there was no higher grade 
than the sixth. Ida was a very good student. She enjoyed school and took full advantage 
of the opportunity to attend. 

Being the oldest child in the family, Ida assumed a lot of responsibility indoors 
and out. She was ambitious and learned to work effectively and rapidly. As time passed 
she was asked to work in other homes. Often, after a hard days work, she received a 
mother hen and some baby chicks or maybe twenty-five cents. 

Everyone worked hard, it was a necessity! Lessons in obedience and thrift were 
taught. Everyone arose early and worked late. It was necessary in the building of a new 
home and providing for a family. 

Included is an example of their thrift and industry. In the fall after a field had 
been harvested by machinery, Isabel, the mother, would take a sheet, a pair of scissors or 
a sharp knife and the small children in the harvested field and cut any stocks of grain that 
the binder may have missed. They put it on the sheet and threshed the golden kernels of 



48 



grain by hand. It was used for food, after being ground in a hand grinder, or for feed for 
the chickens or animals. Nothing was wasted. The old maxim, "Waste not, want not," 
was practiced. Economy was always on their minds. 

They worked together and in 1910 were able to enjoy their new rock, two story 
home. They had planted shade and fruit trees. Ida, being the oldest child, assumed a lot 
of responsibility, which helped to prepare here for future years when she would share a 
home with her companion. 

As the months passed the family made friends in their new home. James 
Betridge, true to his promise, made visits to the Grover home each fall to see Ida. The 
bond of friendship grew stronger with each visit. However, they were young and cupid 
saw other possibilities. Ida attended Church regularly with her parents. She attended 
bonfire and other parties in the homes of friends. She was jolly and a good mixer and 
loved everyone. 

Marshall needed logs to do some building. He made arrangements with Sidney 
Weekes to have them delivered. When the delivery date arrived, John was given the 
privilege. Much to his delight, a close friendship had been formed between John and Ida. 

In the year 1 889 Samuel Weekes grew sugar cane in the area. It was a new crop 
for the valley. He cut it and ground the stocks in a machine, which save the juice. It was 
called sorgum and when boiled it made a syrup. Sugar was scarce so the syrup was used 
as a sweetener or with bread and butter. Often the syrup was used to make taffy. 
Marshall bought two fifty-gallon barrels of sorgum. The young people came to the 
Grover home often and made taffy during the evenings. It was customary for young 
people to spend the evenings in groups rather than as couples and the Grover home was 
always open to Ida's friends. 

Several seasons passed and friendships were formed. One fall a party had been 
planned at the Robison home. It happened that James Betridge was visiting Ida. She 
invited him to attend. He was happy at the thought of attending. During the evening he 
was most attentive to Ida. The fellows felt that his attention was extreme and certainly 
obnoxious. The idea of a stranger coming in and demanding full attention of one of their 
young ladies really irritated them. James was so overbearing. There was a whisper here 
and there and plans were made to put James in his place. 

It was decided that one of the boys should kiss Ida goodnight in James' presence, 
but who should do it? Would John dare do it? Of course he would, why not? He loved 
Ida too! The party was closing. Goodnights were being said. When the appropriate time 
arrived John slipped his arms around Ida and kissed her. Merriment followed. Poor 
James was shocked beyond measure. His hopes were shattered. The guests left and the 
party ended. No one knew the words between Ida and James that night, but it was James' 
last visit to see Ida. 

John still had competition. Luke Briggs, a young Englishman, loved Ida too. He 
brought candy in his pockets each time he came to see her. In that day. candy was a 
delicacy. Luke didn't give up immediately. A young Mr. Wilcox also offered 
interference but John had qualities that pleased Ida. He was good looking, a fine 
companion to be with and ambitious. They enjoyed riding their ponies together. He soon 
won first place in Ida's heart, much to his joy. 

Days and weeks became even busier for John. Now in addition to working on the 
land he must plan and build a home. This he did through long hours of hard work. 



49 



Weeks flew by, the house was built and John was proud of it. He was especially proud of 
the floor. The boards fit together so close that there were no cracks for things to slip 
through. 

Life had been hard for John without a mother and a father only part-time. Only 
thoughts of Ida as his sweetheart and companion brought joy. They chose November 20, 
1 894 as their wedding day and made plans to be married in the Temple, but the Logan 
Temple was so far away. They needed a new wagon to make the trip. They resolved 
they would work out their problems and be married in the Temple just as soon as 
possible. 

November 20 th came. In the evening John called for Ida and they went to Bishop 
Wilcox's home where they were married. Ida was beautiful in her new brown and white 
cotton dress. To John she was alluring and had never been so beautiful. At last she was 
his bride. They were both grateful. They returned to the Grover home where they 
enjoyed a delicious wedding supper. Later they went to their very own home with a firm 
determination to enjoy the blessings of a temple wedding in the very near future. 

With joy they entered their new home. Ida was pleased with John's hard work. 
They felt that it was well furnished. They had a stove, table, six chairs, a rocking chair, a 
trunk and a homemade cupboard. In a year or two they traded wood, pigs or chickens for 
other needed items. 

They both worked long, hard hours to complete the removal of sage from the land 
so it could be cultivated. John had to help build ditches and canal's to get water out of 
the river and on to the ground. This was a difficult work because the ground was higher 
than water in the river. Father said he spent more time on the river than his farm for the 
first few years. Father was a very influential worker. He was wise, quick to act and very 
bold. He worked very well with a team of horses in the water and on the river bank. 

Now we return to their home life. They worked and planned together. Life had 
often been lonely for Father and now he was not alone. A year after they were married, 
on November 16, 1895, they were blessed with the safe arrival of a beautiful baby boy, 
Marshall Leslie. He was such a joy and increased their desire to be sealed in the Temple. 
A year later, on October 21, 1896, they made it a reality. Having purchased a new wagon 
and canvas for the top, the major problem was taken care of and other arrangements were 
completed. Their morning and evening meals would be prepared over a bonfire and a 
lunch at noon. They could now make their dream come true. 

With gratitude and joyful anticipation they began their trip to the Logan Temple. 
It was many miles with a team and wagon. Father was anxious to return to his home in 
Logan. It had been so many years that he had been away. His mother and grandmother 
had passed away in 1888. This would be his first visit since his mother's passing. Word 
of her death on May 1, 1888, had been received but poor connections on the train and 
other delays had prevented them form arriving until after she had been buried in the 
Smithfield Cemetery. Conditions would be so different now, but he had sisters, aunts and 
uncles in Smithfield and John would have his precious wife and baby son to meet 
relatives. He was pleased about that. 

When they arrived in Smithfield, they were welcomed by his Father's oldest 
brother, Dave Weekes, and his wife Hannah. His Mother's brother, Tom Pilgrim and his 
wife, Annie and sisters Lizzie and Sarah. After a special visit in Smithfield they went on 
to Logan where they were sealed and became a forever family. It was a joy and a 



50 



blessing they had longed for since their marriage two years before. Now it was a reality. 
They were now candidates for the Celestial Kingdom if they would be true to the 
covenants they had made in the Temple. 

They returned home with hearts full of gratitude and a strong determination to 
live true and faithful in order to obtain the promised blessings. As their daughter, I know 
that they did. 

Their hard work and diligence seemed more rewarding then ever before. Weeks 
and months flew by. They lived a very busy life but always observed the Sabbath. They 
paid an honest tithing and remained active in the Church. 

Their hearts were gladdened on April 1 8, 1 898 when a darling baby girl, Susan 
Isabel arrived at their home. It was a special joy to have both a son and a daughter. 

A couple of years later, on May 2, 1900 they welcomed William Lyman as a 
playmate for Leslie. Leslie was a jolly little lad where Lyman was more serious minded. 
It seemed they were to be blessed with a large family. Bertha Rebecca was born March 
28, 1903. Mother's tasks were multiplied but she was energetic and managed very well. 

Another baby daughter, Maude Christina, was born November 4, 1904 and John 
Samuel, a fine baby boy. was born September 14, 1906. Sadness soon filled the hearts of 
the entire family when he passed away a few hours after he was born. Heavenly Father 
blessed them with another son, Robert Ursel, on September 7, 1907. On January 17, 
1910, a daughter, Opal was born. 

With parents and seven children the family home had become quite congested, so 
father and mother arranged to have Lon Johnson and a friend build a large frame house. 
It was to have a large kitchen and dining room, parlor and bedroom, three small rooms 
and a porch on the front and back of the house. There was also an upstairs with three 
large bedrooms and three closets. It was a spacious new home when it was finished. 
Shortly after it was completed, another daughter, Eldora Pearl, was born on October 7, 
1912. What a joy, a new baby sister and a new home. The family enjoyed both. 

On July 3, 1914, a beautiful baby girl was born. She was named Alta Grace. 
Everyone's happiness soon turned to sadness when we were told that her body was not as 
perfect as all the others had been. There was balloon like growth filled with fluid on her 
spine, midway between her shoulders. Dr. Walker told us that even though she was only 
hours old she would soon need to have surgery. Dr. Walker said the balloon would 
continue to grow and then burst. We could hardly imagine surgery on a new-born baby. 
It seemed that there was no choice but surgery. After fasting and countless prayers. 
Brother Alma B. Larsen, our Patriarch and very dear friend, was called to give her a 
blessing there in the hospital before surgery. 

Brother Larsen promised that the surgery would be successful and that Alta would 
live to become a mother and enjoy the joys of motherhood. He promised that through 
her, many people would hear the gospel and become members of the Church. We were 
most grateful for that blessing and it was fulfilled as promised. Alta was the joy of the 
family. She was a pretty little girl. Her hair was inclined to curl and Mother kept it in 
curls from time to time. 

The years immediately ahead were filled with sorrow and sadness. Lyman, a 
husky, robust youth, became suddenly ill. Doctors were baffled. As a last resort they 
performed surgery but it was to no avail. Lyman passed away at the age of sixteen and 



51 



!/2, on January 12, 1917. It seemed so impossible. He'd always been so healthy. He'd 
been a source of cheer and happiness to the entire family. 

World War 1 was declared. Leslie was drafted and sent to Camp Kearny, 
California. What a blow to the family to have both of the oldest sons away. However, it 
became much more serious when influenza swept through the nation. In training, Leslie 
became ill with it. Doctors were unable to cope with it and like so many others, Leslie 
passed away at Camp Kearny on December 2, 1918. 

The loss of the two oldest sons seemed unbearable. It was such a shock. Both 
sons had been excellent support and help to their parents. Father had felt it wise to buy 
additional land and had purchased an additional 100 acres in the Hebert area. The only 
thing possible to do was to carry on. Needless to say, it required the fullest cooperation 
of every other member in the family. All assumed additional responsibility. To add to 
the work and worry Isabel was serving a mission in the Central States Mission. All 
worked harder than was good for their health. 

A special ray of light came to us on February 5, 1919, when a beautiful baby girl, 
Madonna, came to bless our home. She was a darling baby and certainly much needed at 
that time. About three years later Ross joined our family. He was a live wire and after 
his arrival there was neither peace nor quiet in our home. He kept things moving. He 
loved pets, especially dogs and horses. He learned to ride early and enjoyed it to the 
fullest. When mature, he rode a team of horses while standing with one foot on the back 
of each horse as they trotted along. He never seemed to have an accident and enjoyed 
many friends. 

Family members worked hard in order to accomplish all that needed to be done, 
often beyond reasonable limits. It set a pattern for their lives. All became hard workers. 

Father suffered from ill health due to serious problems with a goiter. Dr. Rich 
treated him with digefoitus, when he should have been giving him digitalis, so he grew 
steadily worse and weak. He changed doctors and went to Dr. Hatch in Idaho Falls, who 
changed his medication and relieved his body so that he became strong enough for the 
removal of a very large goiter. A little later Ursel received his call to serve a mission. 
Upon examination it was found that he also needed surgery for a goiter. 

Years earlier in Father's life, he was using a scraper to level land. It was 
necessary to walk behind and raise a heavy metal handle as the scraper filled with dirt so 
that the dirt could empty. The blade seemed to hit a hard spot, which caused the handle 
to flip upward and hit Father in the chest. In time he became very miserable and was 
confined to bed. Dr. Walker came to our home and discovered that fluid had gathered in 
his lung. It was necessary to drain the fluid and there were quarts of fluid removed 
before he recovered. 

The dry farm proved to be a problem at planting and harvest time. Father and 
Mother worked harder and the girls filled in where ever they could. Eventually, Father 
rented and then sold the dry farm. There was still plenty to do on the home farm. 

As the years passed, hard work and worry took their toll and ill health became a 
problem for both Mother and Father. Alta was a great support and strength during those 
years. The older girls were all married or working away from home. Believe me, Alta 
worked too, in the house, the garden, the flowers, caring from the chickens or whatever 
else needed attention. She was most cooperative and considerate and a constant strength 
and support. 



52 



Mother's most offensive illness seemed to be gallbladder problems. Medically 
she could get little relief. She endured severe pain at times. One time she had a high 
temperature of 105 degrees. We were all concerned. She was irrational at times and we 
prayed as we worked to reduce the temperature. We had but little effect. Realizing that 
it had to be reduced or she faced serious problems, we called Dr. Rigby only to find out 
that aspirin, cold packs and sponging were about all we could do. We had been doing all 
of that. 

We called Dr. Hatch in Idaho Falls and were told the same thing again. We knew 
we needed help. Father said, " I know what will reduce it. Call Bishop Smith and ask 
him to come and administer to her." He brought Brother D.O. Wilcox and with father 
they gave her a special blessing. As we said "Amen" she joined us and when I looked at 
her face and it was so natural I said, "Mother, 1 don't think you have a temperature now." 
For the first time all morning she spoke coherently and as normal as she had ever done. 
Her features were normal and she answered, "I don't believe I do." I slipped the 
thermometer in her mouth. No thermometer ever recorded more nearly 98.6. We'd all 
witnessed a speedy and direct answer to a Priesthood blessing. 

Faith and prayer were very important factors in our family life. So often blessings 
come as a reward to us. Another striking example occurred in 1932. I was teaching 
school in Tetonia and while visiting at home did some shopping. I purchased a pair of 
shoes that seemed to be the right size, but when I tried wearing them for very long they 
hurt my feet. Mother said she would try to break them in for me. I left them for her. As 
was natural for Mother to do, she exerted extra effort, enduring pain and swelling. 
Before she realized it, she was in serious trouble and she had to be taken to the hospital in 
Idaho Falls. Dr. Hatch did what he could, but finally said that amputation was the next 
step and it did look necessary. Father said, "No, don't amputate her foot." Through even 
more sincere faith and prayers improvement came and her foot was spared. Heavenly 
Father has been so kind and merciful to us so many countless times as answers to our 
faith and prayers have come and blessings received in answer. 

Another exceptional blessing came in the late 1930's. It had been a beautiful day 
in June. The men-folk were haying and Donna and I were picking strawberries about 
6:00 p.m. The sky was cloudless, just a perfect day. Suddenly a clap of thunder came 
loud enough to crash the sky and lightening close enough to scare us to death. We were 
stunned. There was no sign previous to the clap of thunder and the flash of lightening. 
We were shocked and we hesitated as we expressed fright and then began picking berries 
again. Suddenly, if thunder could be louder and lightening closer, it was. We jumped 
and ran quickly to the house. As we entered we smelled gun-powder. The electric stove 
had been a victim. Mother said, "I am sure glad it struck in here rather than in the stack- 
yard where the men are working!" About that time Ursel and Sam Grover neared the 
porch carrying father. His arms and legs were bent at right angles and his color was 
ashen. He groaned painfully. Mother said, "Lay him on the bed and administer to him." 
It was impossible to remove even his shoes. He groaned constantly and needless to say 
we prayed continually. There was little we could do. After the blessing Mother said, 
"Call the doctor." I had, and since it was a little past 6:00 p.m.. Dr. Rigby said he would 
come right out and he did. It was impossible to move Father without increased pain, but 
the Dr. looked carefully and then said, "In the morning, or when you can remove clothes, 
you'll see the holes in his head and feet where the lightening entered and left his body." 



53 



With the intense pain we could not touch his body. We stood on guard with countless 
prayers in our hearts. About midnight he first attempted to speak, but it was only an 
audible sound. Mother said she wondered if he wanted a drink. She attempted to give 
him one but he couldn't swallow and it ran from his mouth onto his pillow. 

There was very little change the next day. He was unable to speak all day but 
during the evening we very, very carefully removed his shoes. The odor of gunpowder 
was very pronounced. Hours later we were able to remove his socks and there was no 
sign of a mark in his feet as the Dr. had said there would be. A miracle was performed. 
His body was not marked, neither his head nor his feet. It was a special blessing given 
because of father's obedience and observance of Heavenly Father's commandments. It 
was plain to us, during the years when we girls did the washing by hand, it was always 
hard to wash and wring Father's garments because he wore the heavy weight, long legged 
and long sleeved garments. When we explained that he should change to the light- 
weight, short sleeved and short legged garments he always said, "these are the garments 
they gave me when we went through the temple. We were told they would be a shield 
and a protection to us and they always have been." So, he continued to wear them and I 
know he enjoyed our Heavenly Father's protection and blessings. What a lesson for each 
of us. Our parents taught so many valuable lessons by their example. They were true to 
the faith and I am grateful to them. 

Mother and Father both had other illnesses and were worried about those in our 
family. Only two or three have been mentioned as reminders of their faith and good 
work in living true gospel principles. Of course, they spent many hours worrying over us 
as children through the years. They were most devoted, hard working parents who were 
worthy and deserving of the blessings they received. 

As months and years slipped away, so did Mother's health. Love her heart, she 
had always worked so very hard. She gave freely and fully of her time and talents for 
others. She was such an energetic person. She was always busy and accomplishing 
worth while things in her life. She had a keen interest in her family, her work, the house 
and in fact the farm. She enjoyed reading and did more as years passed and she had to 
spend more time in her rocking chair. She was selective in choice of material, the daily 
paper, church magazines or books and the scriptures. 

Mother was always interested in what the family was doing and spent time 
visiting and giving the finest counsel. In the very last past of her life Brother Alma 
Larsen, Patriarch, gave her a Patriarchal blessing. It was a most beautiful blessing, so 
well deserved and most spiritual. It must have filled her with joy. 

When Eldora married Lynn Randall on August 9, 1939, Madonna married Newell 
Piquet on March 12, 1941 and Opal married Keith Clements on December 9, 1941, Alta 
remained with Mother and Father giving her best efforts to make life easier and more 
enjoyable for them. She served so freely and efficiently that a strong bond of love 
developed between them. 

Gradually ill health caused Mother to spend more time in her rocker and then in 
bed. When Dr. M.F. Rigby came one spring day, she asked, "How much longer must I 
stay in bed?" "We'll do our very best to get you up again as quickly as we can," he said. 
She wanted to know if she would be able to go huckleberrying again, she loved the out of 
doors and the canyons. The Dr. assured her he'd do his very best to make her wish 



54 



possible. It was not to be. Her health continued to fail. Her once strong body became 
weaker each day. 

She was released from earthly care and responsibility on June 12, 1942. She 
certainly must have enjoyed her sons, John Samuel, Lyman and Leslie, while we here on 
earth mourned her absence. She was a wonderful mother whose work had been 
especially well done. She had set a splendid example to each of us. 

Mother's passing was the saddest experience of our lives, particularly Father's. 
She'd been an excellent support and strength for him. It was indeed a blessing that Alta, 
Everett and Ursel were still living in the home. It was a joy on September 11, 1948 when 
Joyce was born. She proved to be a shining light in their home. Father enjoyed her so 
much. On September 26, 1952, Alta and Everett were blessed with a son, Alden, who 
added even more joy to their family. 

When father was eighty years old we coaxed him to quit driving his car and let 
some of us take him where and when he wanted to go. He spent time visiting in the 
homes of his daughters. There he was able to teach grandchildren such skills as how to 
iron clothes properly and wash the dishes. He even made a stool for Donna's girls to 
stand on at the sink. 

His influence was felt in all of his grandchildren's lives as he taught them to be 
kind to each other and to be frugal. He was always happy when they made good choices 
and helped parents. He was lonely without Mother, but he remained true to covenants 
they'd make and the principles of the gospel. He was a fine example for members of his 
family throughout his life. 

Father passed away on April 22, 1956 at the age of 83 and was laid to rest beside 
his dear companion, Ida, in the Archer Cemetery. What a reunion it must have been as he 
met his eternal companion, his sons and parents, Sidney and Susan, along with a host of 
other relatives and loved ones. May we all be true to the faith so that we may join with 
them one day. 

Written by Opal Clements 



55 



JOHN & IDA WEEKES FAMILY 

John Weekes had homesteaded 120 acres of land joining his father's, Sidney Weekes, 
when they came from Utah to Idaho in 1883. The land was in its native state of sage brush, 
grasses and other foliage. Father and son worked together to get it under cultivation. Canals and 
ditches demanded much attention and had to be made in order to irrigate and produce crops. 
There was much to be done, but regardless of that fact, Sidney was arrested for plural marriage 
and had to spend a year and a half in the federal prison in South Dakota. John's older brother 
George, worked with them. He homesteaded land in Archer nearer to his wife's family. Prior to 
John's marriage to Ida Grover, Nov. 20, 1894, he built a one-room log house on his 120 acres. 
He had much sage to clear and leveling left to do. After their marriage a garden and many 
flowers graced their yard. 

Before 1 900 there were few fences and people traveled from one place to another pretty 
much as the crow flies, or the shortest distance between two points. When the roadway was 
established, John and Ida's house was about an eighth of a mile west of the road. They wanted to 
live nearer the road and needed a larger house also, so another house was built facing east and 
near the road. This home had two large rooms with two smaller ones on the west side of it. 
Several of the children were born in this home. 

Much sadness came when John Samuel, sixth child and third son, passed away on Oct. 
14, 1906. He had lived only twenty-one days. However, Ursel's birth on December 7, 1907 
helped to ease their grief and heartache. 

There was much to be done. They had planted an orchard of apple, pear, cherry, plum 
and shade trees. There was a large garden and berry patches to be taken care of. There were 
chickens, pigs, horses, and cattle to be cared for so everyone, parents and children included 
worked hard. Through united effort there was always plenty of nutritious food. Vegetables, 
fruits, milk, cream, homemade butter, meat, and eggs were always on hand and served to the 
family and anyone else who happened to be on hand at meal time. 

Mother was a very good cook and always thrifty; using wisdom in all she did. She and 
the girls made clothing, lovely quilts, pillows and cases, laundry soap, jams, jellies, and 
countless other needed items. 

Life presented many challenges. Father said circumstances were extremely trying at first 
when he was trying so hard to get the land under cultivation and irrigation. 

There was a time when Father had only two horses and needed more horse power than 
they could provide. One spring he was plowing with a hand plow, and the sage was so tough to 
cut off. The sun was hot and the horses were light for the work and tired easily. One of the 
horses got so sick that he had to unhook them. Father's heart was so heavy, he was really 
discouraged. The crops needed to be planted soon in order to have time to mature. The only 
solution was more horse power. He knelt down there in the field by the plow and pled fervently 
for help and guidance. Shortly after he arose a neighbor, James Byrne, came to him and said. 
"John, I know you are busy, but I need some help. I haven't any money to pay you, but I do have 
a good horse I'll give you. Can you help me?" Knowing that his prayer had been answered, the 
answer was yes. The work was done. The horse he received was a very good one and Father 
said, "From that day on I was never short of horse power. The Lord was kind to me." 

Father often had three and four outfits in the field when the children were old enough to 
drive a team. It seemed that there was always a choice of horses and some to spare. Our parents 



56 



tried to show gratitude for this and countless other blessings by paying a full tithing, attending 
meetings, and responding to calls made of them. 

Father was using a Fresno scraper and met with a very painful accident. The scraper had 
a handle, or bar, four or five feet long, which the operator must hold to control loading and 
emptying the dirt. The blade struck a rock, hard earth, or some other immovable object, which 
suddenly pulled the handle out of his hands. He was struck in the ribs with the handle causing 
very serious injury. Before healing took place, he took pneumonia. His lungs filled with fluid 
and his condition became critical. Dr. Walker came to the home periodically and drew the fluid 
from his lungs. This was put into two-quart jars and amounted to a large quantity. Again through 
faith and prayers and the efforts of a skilled physician he was healed. 

On July 3, 1914, Alta a beautiful baby girl, was born. She was born with a birth defect on 
her spinal column. It was a balloon like growth. As this delicate tissue expanded, the danger that 
it would burst increased. If it burst it would cause death. Only nine cases like it had been known 
in the United States. Seven of the nine babies had died. After fasting and prayer and seeking the 
advice from Brother Alma B. Larsen, our Patriarch, it was decided that she should undergo 
surgery even though she was less than a month old. Father watched the operation and said he 
could see her tiny heart and lungs functioning while the Doctor worked. It must have 
commanded a maximum of faith and courage, but Brother Larsen had given her a wonderful 
blessing promising her that she would live to maturity and become a mother in Israel, so they 
trusted and prayed. Through the power of the priesthood, the goodness of our Heavenly Father, 
and the tender loving care of our parents, she lived. Such a sweet blessing she has been to our 
family. 

The year of 1915 passed with only the usual or ordinary illnesses and problems, but in 
1916 Lyman, age sixteen, the second son, who was robust and jovial became ill quite suddenly. 
The doctors were baffled. He under went exploratory surgery, but to no avail. His condition 
worsened and again he was operated on. The doctors learned that he had peritonitis, an infection 
of the stomach lining, but it was too late to be of any use in saving his life. He passed away 
January 12, 1917. It seemed as if he were called to a special mission in Heaven for which he was 
very well prepared. Grief flooded the hearts of our parents and loved ones. 

Leslie, the oldest child, who was more reserved and who had always been delicate so far 
as health was concerned, had attended school and taken missionary classes at Ricks College in 
preparation for a mission for the LDS Church. However, when World War I was declared, 
regardless of his health, he was drafted into the military service. He was sent to an army base in 
California, Camp Kearney. That summer he was taken to an army hospital and operated on for 
appendicitis. Complications arose and he failed to regain his health and strength. He was granted 
a 30 day furlough from the service which he gladly spent at the home of his parents. At the 
conclusion of the furlough he returned to Camp Kearney, even though he was not well. In a few 
weeks the terrible epidemic of influenza swept army bases just as it did the rest of the land. 
Leslie took it with infection in his body to begin with and he really suffered with it. Army 
personnel called home to report his condition, but at home, Ursel, Opal, Eldora and Alta were all 
in beds downstairs. Ursel and Eldora had very high temperatures and were very sick. Bertha 
and Maude were in Rexburg at school. Isabel was in Missouri on a mission. Father and Mother 
waited on and worried about sick children until they came down with it and were also sick. We 
were under quarantine. La Von Weekes, Father's half sister, a nurse, came to care for us at 
home. We all recovered, but Leslie's condition grew worse each day until death came on 
December 2, 1918. His death was tragic! The loss of the second son in young manhood in less 
than a year seemed unbearable. 



57 



Imagine, if you can, the days and weeks and life ahead for his parents. In addition to the 
sorrow and grief of losing these two young men, both celestial material, there was the additional 
physical burden. They had purchased a dry farm in Herbert they had needed it with three young 
men, now suddenly the force was diminished by two thirds. The remaining days of December 
1918 and January 1919 slowly drug by and then it seemed as if Heaven smiled upon us. To 
Mother, age forty-five, on February 5, 1919, a lovely daughter was born. What a joy she was to 
everyone. She was named Madonna. 

Enjoyed by each family member was our annual huckleberry trip. We often took both a 
buggy and a wagon, also a pony to ride. Huckleberry trips were such a delight. Pine boughs, 
plenty of quilts and blankets were such a joy. Sleeping bags were unheard of at that time. We 
children had our own buckets, the smaller the child the smaller the bucket, but we all filled our 
buckets. Father made it possible, often in two ways. He'd ride a horse, scouting for the very best 
berry patches, then he'd often give two or three handfuls of berries as an encouragement 
measure. Often we had a delicious chicken dinner, chickens seemed quite numerous and would 
often fly up near our berry patch only to be killed with a stick or a rock and then cleaned and 
cooked in the evening. [Madonna talked of taking a 10 gallon milk can or two up to the hills and 
they would fill it with huckleberries and her mother would take bottles and actually can them 
there in the hills over the fire. They would of course, stay for several days and come home with a 
great supply.] We had candy pulls too, around the bonfire and always plenty of delicious food. 
Huckleberry trips were such fun. We looked forward to them from one year to another, just like 
we did Christmas. 

Written by Opal Weekes 




John & Ida Weekes Family 
Back: Maude, Madonna, Bertha, Isabel, Opal, Alta 
Front: Ida, John, Ursel 



58 



IDA ISABEL GROVER WEEKES 

Marshall Hubbard Grover and his wife Isabel Orr Grover lived in Grantsville, Utah. 
Their first child, Marshall Thomas, was born 14 Dec. 1872. He died 8 1/2 months later. A 
daughter, Ida Isabel was born 13 April 1874. She was a beautiful baby with black curly hair and 
eyes of grayish green. She was very alert and needless to say, was the pride and joy of her 
parents. On April 5, 1876, a baby brother, Robert Edgar was born. Nine other brothers joined the 
family. Samuel was born 19 May 1878, Elisha Freeman 11 April 1880, Lyman Emery, 15 Dec. 
1884, John Orr, 8 Nov. 1886, William Leslie, 12 March 1889, Seth Bennett 30 May 1891, 
Wesley Lavern 13 May 1894, Raymond 24 May 1897, Clifford, Aug. 1, 1899. Her only sister, 
Caroline Elizabeth was born 13 May 1882 and died 24 Jan. 1912. 

Ida's home in Grantsville was a two-room adobe house with a shingled roof; it was better 
than most young people had at that time. 

In the spring of 1876, Marshall received a call from the US. Govt., to supervise the Ute 
Indians on the reservation in Grouse Creek, Utah. He was to teach them American customs and 
settle grievances that arose. The family moved to the northwestern part of the state of Utah. At 
this time, Ida and Robert were the only children in the family. They were welcomed by the 
Indians, who soon became dear friends. They called Marshall their "White Papa" and showed 
love and respect for his family. 

When Ida was four years old (1874) she became seriously ill due to complications from 
scarlet fever. Infection gathered in her throat, causing a large swelling, that interfered with her 
breathing. It became necessary to lance her throat to release the infection. This was done by 
using a small pocket or penknife; and had to be done two or three times. She was laid on a table 
and held by four men while the work was done. The scar remained on her throat throughout her 
life. During her recovery her grandmother, Caroline Hubbard Grover, spent much time with the 
family. She was a nurse and had also taught school. She and Ida's parents taught Ida to recognize 
and write the letters of the alphabet. She could spell several words, and knew many of the 
addition and subtraction combinations before she started school. In that day it was customary to 
enter school at the age of eight. The schoolhouse was a small, one-roomed building with a dirt 
floor and shingled roof. She attended Sunday School in the same building, also Sacrament 
Meeting. She learned to read really well and enjoyed it. Numbers held an interest for her and she 
became very apt with them, in fact, superior to her children who had advantage of higher 
education. She went only through the sixth reader, which was comparable to the sixth grade. 

Much responsibility rested upon Ida since she was the oldest child in the family. She 
assisted with the cooking, washing and ironing for the family and helped outside when it was 
necessary. Her father assisted the Indians with their work, but it was also necessary for him to 
haul provisions from Tacoma, Nevada, since there was no store nearer. Often he hauled ore from 
Rocky Pass into Tacoma. This trip required three or four days and was made with horses and a 
wagon with a flat rack. The ore was packed in small bags. Later, it was hauled by train. At this 
time, it was a means of helping Marshall make extra money for his family. This was important 
because the rainfall was very light, seldom enough to mature their crops in Grouse Creek. 

Mrs. Wm. Betridge, who lived near the Grovers', often needed help with her family. Ida 
was invited, and loved to slip away from home and her daily duties, to assist. She insisted she 
had no particular reason for enjoying this experience, but to me it seems obvious that the young 
James Betridge was the center of attraction. Gradually she became more interested in him than 



59 



any other of her friends. He was a fine young man, clean and exemplary in every respect. He was 
a blonde with an adorable personality and became very important to her. 

His father was a shoemaker by trade and made Ida several nice pairs of shoes. One of 
which, she admitted, was the prettiest pair she had ever owned. They were made of fine black kid 
leather, stitched with white silk thread. They were high shoes, extending several inches above the 
ankle. The edges were scalloped and fastened with pretty buttons. She buttoned them with a 
metal buttonhook. How she admired and treasured them! No doubt young James took pride in 
them also, for he worked in his father's shoe shop. As he became older his interests turned to 
other fields of endeavor. 

In 1889, after twelve and a half years of service as supervisor of the Ute Indians, 
Marshall was released from his responsibilities with the Indians. Several seasons had gone by 
with very little rainfall so the soil failed to yield an abundance. Marshall found it difficult to 
provide for his family as he'd like to, so he made arrangements to move to Idaho. It was difficult 
to leave Grouse Creek for they'd formed friendships both Red and White that were hard to break. 
However, goodbyes were said and the long trek began in July 1 889, in a covered wagon. Ida and 
one of the boys rode ponies and drove cattle and horses. She loved to ride and rode very well She 
had her own fine pony and sidesaddle, which she always used when she rode. 

Their progress was slow over the hot, sage covered, plains. They presented a true picture 
of pioneer life as they wended their way northward. As they neared the Fort Hall Indian 
Reservation, they were greeted by a group of Indian braves from the Bannock Tribe. They were 
happy to meet Marshall and Isabel; thru their friends, the Utes, they knew of his work with the 
Indians in Grouse Creek. Consequently, they were very friendly. They seemed overly anxious to 
herd the cattle and horses. Marshall was hesitant, but there was little else he could do, but to trust 
them. They assured him they'd see they had the best feed and return them whenever Marshall 
wanted them. They assured him that they'd been told many times of his work as "White Papa" 
with their friends the Ute Indians. Marshall set a definite day for the return of the animals and 
they were driven away to graze. This pause in their journey was a golden opportunity for Isabel 
and Ida. Hurriedly, they washed, cooked and baked for the family. Baby William was four 
months old and there were seven other children. There was much to be done to make the rest of 
their journey more pleasant. 

At the appointed time the stock were returned in fine condition and the family moved 
northward. When they reached the Snake River, it was necessary to be ferried across the river, 
for in 1889, there was no bridge. The ferry was a crude structure, having no sides except a rope 
stretched from corner to corner. Wagons and the youngest stock were ferried, but the older stock 
were forced to swim the fast moving water. The crossing was made without accident or injury, 
though not without fear, especially for Isabel and the children. 

The family went north to the home of William Beatie in the Burton area. Previously, he 
had helped to make arrangements for the 1 60 acres of land in Lyman that was to become the 
Grover property. On July 26, 1889, the Grover family traveled south several miles to their 
destination. What a joy it was to see the two-roomed log house already built. A well had been 
dug and several shade trees welcomed them. There was also a chicken coop. Each did it's best to 
make the place inviting. However, there was much to be done. Marshall and Isabel began by 
making a ceiling of muslin in the house. Doors and window frames were given a coat of paint. 
Isabel had brought both the muslin and paint from Utah. Homemade carpet covered the bedroom 
floor and the other floors were bare. They were scrubbed and kept shiny. Their furniture 



60 



consisted of four beds, a cook stove, a box heater, a cupboard and washstand. Other pieces of 
furniture were added when needed. Their home was always comfortable, clean and cheery. 

Of the 160 acres of land belonging to Marshall and Isabel, nine had been plowed 
previous to their arrival. The rest was a waving mass of sage, some of it five feet tall. When 
pulled and piled, it made lovely bonfires in the evenings. Friends often came to enjoy the fun at 
the close of day. Clearing the farm of this hoary shrub was a tedious task, but eventually, 
through united effort, it was accomplished and the soil was brought under cultivation. 

The schoolhouse was not far away in a southwesterly direction, near the Archer church. 
It was a one-roomed, whitewashed, log building; poorly lit with small windows and at night, coal 
oil lamps. A Miss Phillips from Provo, Utah was Ida's first teacher in Idaho. The teacher's 
vacation was spent in this vicinity, helping in the hay, shocking grain and raising chickens or 
turkeys; often she assisted in homes where she was needed. 

During the glorious days of autumn, Isabel took the children who were old enough to 
help her, a sheet and some sacks into the field. With scissors, golden heads of grain that had been 
left by the harvester were cut. They were "gleaners" in the truest sense of the word. Each head 
was a grain of gold to be exchanged for food or clothing. 

Ida assisted her mother and did much outside to help her father, but often the privilege of 
helping a neighbor came to her. Often she forded the Snake River on her pony to work for the 
Moss family. Usually one of her suitors accompanied her and would bring her pony home with 
him. At the close of a hard-days work, she was paid with a mother hen and eight or ten fluffy 
chickens. Many a day she worked for twenty-five cents. Nevertheless, with everyone working, 
theirs was a happy home. Lessons in obedience and love for others were learned. Everyone arose 
early and worked hard; it was necessary in the building of a home in a new land. Economy was, 
of necessity, uppermost on their minds. Members of the family worked hard to prevent anything 
from going to waste. Often, there was a surplus, but it was taken care of and shared with or sold 
to others in need. 

As months rolled by, the family made very dear friends in their new home. James 
Betridge, true to his promise visited Ida each fall and this bond of friendship grew continually 
stronger, regardless of their separation. Their romance was on the verge of blossoming. Each felt 
there could never be another in whom they could place more love and confidence. However, 
Cupid slyly winked and smiled! He saw other possibilities developing. Time would become 
master of the situation. With her sweetheart far away so much of the time and her friends 
enjoying themselves, why should Ida be lonely? Why not share their good times and happiness 
when invited to do so? At least, just a little bit of it. but no, true to her promise she must wait and 
be true for now she was engaged. 

Marshall needed to do some building, so he placed an order with Sidney Weekes, an 
early pioneer of the Valley, for the delivery of some pine logs. They were to be exchanged for a 
team of mules. The task of delivering these logs was given to Sidney's young son, John. In doing 
so, he met Ida. His smile, broad shoulders and general appearance caused Ida's heart to beat real 
fast. I'm afraid for a moment or two, she forgot her promise to James Betridge. It was the first 
time she'd seen John; how thrilled and excited she was! Later, they met in a group, at bon fire 
parties, dances and socials or sleigh riding parties. It was customary in that day to spend the 
evening in a group rather than as couples - John and Ida were a part of the group. 

In the fall of 1889, the family of Samuel Weekes Sr., neighbors of the Grover's. raised 
sugar cane, a crop that hadn't been grown previously in the area. When harvested, the cane was 
ground in sorghum mills, the juice dripped into large iron barrels and then boiled to a syrup. The 



61 



top was skimmed and used in making molasses candy, as sandwich spreads or in cooking. 
Marshall bought two fifty-gallon barrels of molasses. It was to be used during the winter with 
other delicacies such as rhubarb, dried peaches, apricots, apples and prunes. Often, friends came 
in and enjoyed molasses or taffy candy and games. Such gaiety! 

Foods were simple, but wholesome. The children grew up hale and hearty, regardless of 
the fact that a slice of bacon, head cheese, other meat or an onion often served as filling for 
sandwiches in their lunches. Each family raised animals for their own meat. Occasionally, 
drippings from cooked meat were mixed with syrup and used as a sandwich spread. Sugar 
sprinkled on a buttered sandwich was a rare treat, for sugar was scarce in those days. 

Fall and winter passed with their usual fun and frolic and then came another joyous 
spring with it's green leaves, buds and blossoms. With it came again the task of clearing 
additional land, and making it ready for cultivation. Unceasingly, the family worked, their honest 
toil was rewarded with an increased acreage of cleared land. With fall, came also the visit of 
James Betridge. The young lover, true to his promise, came north to visit his bride-to-be. 
Graciously, he accepted the invitation to a house party given at the Robinson home. The evening 
was full of fun and merry making. As usual the entire crowd enjoyed themselves, but I'd venture 
to say James more than any other. His attentiveness to his lady became very obvious. Here a 
whisper, there a whisper, then a buzz. The fellows were plotting against poor James. The idea of 
an outsider demanding the complete attention of one of their group became obnoxious to them, 
regardless of his engagement. Someone dared one of their group (it was none other than John) to 
kiss Ida goodnight in James's presence. Who was John to be dared? Most assuredly he'd do it! He 
had the courage to prove his love for her and would. The merriment continued; suddenly when 
the moment seemed right to John, he kissed Ida goodnight in the presence of everyone. No 
doubt, she was bewildered, but poor James! He could never out live his embarrassment. Little 
did that matter to John - he'd proven himself to be the hero. Anyway, a faint heart had never won 
a fair lady. All the fellows gloried in his courage, even though young James was bursting with 
wrath and indignation. No one knew the conversation that passed between the sweethearts - 
James and Ida - later that night, but it's meaning became quite obvious, for that was the last time 
James ever paid Ida a visit. However, he sent several letters in the weeks that followed. 

What a glorious day it was for John! He considered himself victorious. Now he was to be 
the suitor. Yet, not exclusively, for Luke Briggs, a young Englishman lived nearer Ida's place 
than he. Luke had several mules, the choice of which - a white one - he called Ida. It was Ida 
who carried him to and from his home to see Ida. He always took a pocket full of candy to her, 
which was a real treat. She was his pride and joy. How he wished he'd win her. 

At this point, a young man named Adrian Wilcox also caused some interference. John 
was made of "stern stuff, so he failed to let these fellows bother him. To him, it seemed Ida was 
meant for him, exclusively, and he intended to win her heart. Both his patience and perseverance 
increased. He was gifted with qualities that made him an ideal suitor. To Ida he seemed so 
genuine, so very genteel and she was by far the sweetest and most attractive girl he'd ever seen. 
In addition, she could cook, sew, and do most anything else she desired to accomplish. In reality, 
she was superior to all other maidens he'd ever known. He must win her heart. She was the one 
center of attraction in his life. The evening of supreme happiness arrived! Each was thrilled when 
John placed a band of gold on her finger and in turn she gave her promise to be true. She kept her 
promise until the day she passed away, 15 June 1942. Thru sunny days and those of sadness and 
heartache she shared both his joys and burdens. 



62 



November 20, 1 894 was chosen as their wedding day. John came to her home about 6 
o'clock in the evening. Joyously he took his bride-to-be to the home of Bishop Samuel Wilcox 
where they were united in marriage. After the ceremony they returned to Ida's home and enjoyed 
a most delicious wedding supper. They spent the evening with the family then left for their own 
love nest. It was previously built by John on ground he'd homesteaded. However, there was work 
to do even on their wedding day, a straw tick had to be filled so the bed could be made and the 
chores must be done, even though it was late. 

Ida had looked so charming in her new brown and white cotton dress, it was neatly 
tailored and most becoming to her. She wore black cotton stockings and pretty shoes of the same 
color. They were high-buttoned shoes with scalloped edges. To John she was alluring! 

Their cozy little log cottage had but one room with a board floor. However, John took 
pride in the fact that there were no cracks between the boards. A large wooden bed, a table and 
six chairs, a stove, rocker, a homemade cupboard, a trunk and clock shelf made their tiny home 
quite cozy and comfortable. In a year or two they traded wood, chickens or pigs for such 
necessary things as a sewing machine, dresser and a washer. 

They worked very hard to complete the clearing of sage from their ground, making and 
helping to maintain ditches and canals; scrapping and preparing land for cultivation. They were 
pioneers in very deed. Previous to their marriage the area had been surveyed and roads made 
according to the survey. John had built his house near the road. Due to a later survey, new lines 
were established and the roads changed, causing their home to be an eighth of a mile west of the 
road. In order to live on the street they moved the house and built another room at that time. The 
house was kept nice and clean and such luxuries as wall paper, lace curtains and an organ found 
place in their home in due time. 

One year after their marriage, 16 Nov. 1895, a son, Marshal Leslie was born. He was a 
beautiful baby and certainly much loved; he was obedient and mild mannered. Now, more than 
ever before, John and Ida sensed the need of going to the temple to be sealed for time and all 
eternity. They continued to work, save and plan so they could buy a new wagon in which to 
make the trip to the Logan LDS Temple. One year later, 31 Oct. 1896, preparations for the trip 
had been completed. A new wagon had been purchased and a canvas cover put on it. A bed and 
table had been made, provisions packed and Ida had done the necessary baking and cooking. Of 
course, they cooked breakfast and supper over the campfire as they camped along the way. 

This trip was most important to them. A dream was to become a reality. They were to 
receive their endowments and be sealed for time and all eternity. They had become candidates 
for the Celestial Kingdom of our Heavenly Father thru all eternity. What a precious reward for 
their toil and sacrifices. 

John was especially anxious to reach Smithfield so he could introduce his dear wife, Ida 
and baby, to members of his family. He longed to visit the home of his childhood. How he'd love 
to see his dear mother and grandmother. He assured himself these were foolish fancies. Both had 
passed away. Everything was different now. Even Will, his youngest brother, was now a college 
student in Logan. Will planned to become an architect and was striving hard to reach his goal. 
His sisters were away also. However, there were still aunts and uncles who were very dear to 
him and friends he'd love to visit. 

His Uncle Dave and Aunt Hannah Weekes (his father's brother and wife) greeted them 
with joy and insisted they stay at their home while in Smithfield. His Aunt Edith Coleman and 
Uncle Will (his father's sister and husband) and his mother's brother. Tom Pilgrim and wife 
Annie gave them a most cordial welcome. Everyone was so pleased to see him and to meet Ida. 



63 



his charming wife and Leslie their baby. Their visit was very pleasant. They were unable to visit 
his old home, for people living there were away. They traveled on to Logan and stayed with Will 
and several of his friends at college. 

Early Oct. 21,1 896 they went to the Logan Temple, received their endowments and were 
sealed as a family, by N. C. Edlefsen. Their joy knew no bounds! 

Life took on a deeper meaning and purpose. Joy filled their hearts. They must ever be true 
to the covenants they had made in order to be worthy of the promised blessings. In due time, they 
returned to their home in Idaho, having enjoyed a most wonderful experience. Their hard work 
and sacrifice had proved so rewarding. It was now easy to work with renewed effort to reach 
higher goals. Both were active in the LDS Church. John served as President of the Elders 
Quorum, in the Sunday School presidency and faithfully as a ward teacher. He was a member of 
the Ward Bldg. Committee when the stone chapel was erected and he served in other capacities. 
Ida was a Sunday School teacher and chorister. She had a pretty voice and loved to sing. She had 
done so often with her brothers Rob and Elisha at socials and programs. She also served as 
secretary of the M.I.A. and as a Relief Society Visiting Teacher. 

In case of illness, she gave loving and efficient care when and wherever she was needed. 
Many babies entered this sphere of action thru her assistance. She always had time and gave 
freely, day or night. 

She welcomed eleven children to her own home: Leslie, 16 Nov. 1895; Susan Isabel, 18 
Apr 1898; William Lyman, 2 May 1900; Bertha Rebecca, 28 Mar. 1903; Maude Christina, 4 
Nov. 1904; John Samuel, 24 Sept. 1906; Robert Ursel, 7 Sept, 1907; Nora Opal, 17 Jan. 1910; 
Eldora Pearl, Oct. 7, 1912; Alta Grace, 3 July 1914; and Madonna, 5 Feb. 1919. 

To give guidance, tender loving care and provide for the material needs for eleven 
children was a tremendous challenge for John and Ida. She was given inspiration and 
discernment in shaping the affairs of her household. With John, her honored husband, she gave 
to her children the noble heritage of work: worth more than the finest silver or gold. Her life was 
not free from problems, sorrows and heartaches - there was plenty of adversity to try her soul and 
patience. Her children's problems were of vital concern to her. 

The death of three sons, John Samuel, an infant, and Lyman and Leslie in early manhood 
and only a year apart proved to be a severe tragedy. As in all other adversity and affliction, her 
faith and countless prayers made her burdens lighter and her soul was enriched. Hard work 
helped her over many a rough spots. She was always busy sewing, mending, cooking and 
planning for the well being of her family. Her husband's problems were her concern also. She 
taught by example as well as by precept. 

Ida enjoyed good health and strength until her later years. In April of 1942, she was 
confined to bed in her own home. She hoped this period would be of short duration, for she 
didn't have time to spend in bed. Much to her dismay, she was really never well again. Her body 
failed to respond to medication prescribed by physicians or the faith and prayers of her loved 
ones. On the 15 June, 1942, at the age of sixty eight, she passed quietly away, leaving her 
husband and son Ursel and the following daughters: Isabel, Bertha, Maude, Opal, Eldora, Alta 
and Madonna and fourteen grandchildren: Ross, Dennis, Reed, and John Nelson; Nilo Marjorie, 
Julia, Idagene and Roxcy Jeppson; Gerald W., Kay and Peter Jeppson; DeAnn Randall and 
Sharon Piquet. 

Written by her daughter, Opal Weekes Clements - 1972 



64 



Valley Pioneer Notes 
Progress Since 1881 



ARCHER— John S. Weekes, Ar- 
cher pioneer, recalls many changes 
since he first came to the Upper 
Snake River valley in 1881. Mr. 
Weekes, who will be honored at 
an open house Sunday, preceeding 
his 80th birthday next Tuesday, 
was reminiscing this week and 
told of the progress since the early 
bL-iuers ai rived. 

This pioneer moved to the Ar- 
cher community with his parents 
at the age of eight, when light for 
the home was provided by burning 
a wick in melted tallow. Lighting 
improved after that, though, he 
recalls, with the coal oil lamp, 
then gas lights. In 1917, he in- 
stalled a Delco battery lighting 
system in his home and later was 
one of the promoters to get the 
Utah Power and Light line extend- 
ed to his community. 

Four Day Trip 

In 1896. Mr. Weekes said, when 
he and his wife went to Logan 
for endowments, they went in a 
covered wagon. The journey, at 
that time, took three and one-half 
to four days, a trip now made in 
less hours than that. 

The octogenarian has been ac- 
tive in building and construction 
work since his youth. He helped 



*sk '/sffck s*&k 




JOHN S. WEEKES, Upper Valley 
pioneer, who will be honored at 
an open house observance ai 
Archer Sunday. 



erect the first L.D.S. meeting 
house in Archer. This edifice was 
a simple, one-room structure of 
logs, with a dirt roof. 

(continued on back page) 



Later, he helped erect a larger 
one-room building — this one with 
a shingled roof. He also served 
on the building committee when 
a new multi-roomed rock chapel 
was constructed and is-rrow assist- 
ing in the building of a new and 
modern brick chapel in the Archer 
ward. 

Mr, Weekes was born on Sep- 
tember 8, 1873. at Smithied. 
Utah, the son of Sidney and Susan 
P'lgrim Weekes. 

Eleven Children 
On November 20, 1894, he mar- 
ried Ida Grover. The couple had 
1 1 children, four sons and seven 
daughters. Three of the sons are 
deceased, and Mrs. Weekes passed 
away in 1942. 

Among his descendants, .who 
are expected to be present at the 
open house birthday .eiebration 
Sunday, are Mrs. Isabel Nelson, 
Mrs. Bertha Jeppson, Maude Jepp- 
son, Ursel Weekes, Mrs. Opal 
Clements, Eldora Randall, Alta 
Brindle and Madonna Piquet, chil- 
dren; 27 grandchildren; and 15 
great grandchildren. 

Friends of Mr. Weekes' are in- 
vited to call between 2:00 and 5:00 
p.m. Sunday at the family resi- 
dence, now owned by Mr. and Mrs. 
Everett Brindle at Archer: 





1 1 \ 





Madonna Weekes daughter of 
John and Ida Weekes, standing 
by their first car. 



*••'■.•*>«»•* * 



Archer Ward Building 
Building Committee in 
Front of the Old Rock 
Chapel in Archer, Idaho. 
John Weekes far right 



65 



FATHER (JOHN WEEKES) STRUCK BY LIGHTNING 

In the late 1930's Father, John Weekes, was leading the derrick horse in the stack yard 
where men were putting up the hay. At 6 p.m. the sky was as clear as it had ever been - 
cloudless. Madonna and I were in the garden picking strawberries about 6 p.m. 
Suddenly a bolt of thunder sounded as if it had ripped the sky open. We were completely 
shocked. There hadn't been a cloud in the sky all day. After the severe shock we 
continued to pick berries. In a very short period of time another blast came - if possible 
it was louder and as before accompanied by lightning. We ran into the house. Mother 
was in the kitchen. The stove had been hit by lightning - the smell of gunpowder was 
very plain. Mother said, "I'm glad it struck in here rather than in the stack yard where 
the men are working." 

At that very moment Ursel and our cousin Sam Grover neared the house carrying 
father who had been leading the derrick horse. His flesh was ash colored. He was 
groaning with pain. He looked as if life had passed from his body. Mother said, "Lay 
him down on our bed and administer to him." We got the oil and Ursel administered to 
him. Father's arms and elbows were bent at right angles - his legs the same and neither 
could be straightened. We called the Dr. and M.F. Rigby came out from Rexburg 
immediately. He looked, shook his head and said, "There isn't a thing I can do." We all 
knew what we could do and said many prayers silently. He groaned and seemed in 
intense pain especially as we touched his body. 

At midnight he attempted to speak but couldn't. Mother said, "I think he wants a 
drink." She tried to give him one but the water remained in his mouth. He couldn't 
swallow as his throat was paralyzed. Countless prayers continued to be said silently. We 
stood by his bed side watching and praying. It was morning before he showed the least 
sign of life and evening before we could remove his shoes. As we did most carefully he 
groaned in pain. The smell of gunpowder lingered in his shoes and clothes. It was hours 
later before we could remove his clothes. His body was stiff and rigid - arms and legs 
still rigid and bent. Dr. Rigby said "It will be hours before you can remove his clothes 
but when you do you'll find the place where lightning entered and left his body." There 
was no sign of evidence on his feet neither was his body marred when we could remove 
his clothes hours later. 

We kept him warm and watched carefully for any visible sign of permanent damage to 
his body. Once as I entered the room I found Mother kneeling in prayer at his bedside 
Heavenly Father was most kind and gracious to answer our countless prayers. We knew 
he could be healed if it were our Heavenly Father's will and it was so. When we could 
remove his clothes it was painful still, but there was no evidence of marks on his body as 
the Dr. had said there would be. 

It was a forceful testimony to us of our Heavenly Father's love and protection. Father 
always wore his long legged and long sleeved garments faithfully. 

By Opal Weekes Clements 



66 



SUCCUMBS 



*09^^ f^Rtot 




John S. Weekes 



John S. Weekes 
Dies At Arche 



(Special to The Post-Regisfrr) 

REXBURG. April 23 — John S. 
Weekes, ST, longtime resident ot 
Madison County, died Sunday at 
8: 15 p.m. at flic home of a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Keith Clements of caus- 
es incident to old age. 

He was born Sept. 8, 1873, at 
Smithfieid, Utah, a son of Sidney 
and Susan Pilgrim Weekes. When 
he was eight years old, the family 
moved to Idaho. He was engaged 
in farming most of his life. 

He was married to Ida Grover. 
Nov. 20, 1894 and tne marriage 
was later solemnized in the Logan 
LDS Temple. He was active in 
LDS Church affairs and in the 
community, At the time of his 
death, he was a member of the 
High Priests Quorum. 

His wife died in 19-12. Survivors 
include a son, Ursel Weekes, Arch- 
er; six daughters;, Rertha Jeppson, 
Archer; Mrs. Keith (Opal) Cle- 
ments: Mrs. Everett (Altai Brin- 
dle, all of Archer; Mrs. Lynn (El- 
dora) Randall; Mrs. Newell (Ma- 
donna) Piquet, both of Idaho Falls; 
Mrs. Gerald (Maude) Jeppson. 
Rexburg; 28 grandchildren; 25 
greatgrandchildren and the follow- 
ing half brothers and sisters: Mrs. 
Lavon Spaulding, Idaho Falls; 
Mrs. Martha Grover. Albert, Leo, 
Cyril and Clarence Weekes, Arch- 
er." 

Services will be held Wednesday 
at 2 p.m. in the Archer LDS Ward 
Chapel with Bishop Kernarr Erick- 
son officiating. Burial will be in 
the Archer Cemetery under direc- 
tion of the Flamm Funeral Home. 
Friends may call at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Everett Brindh , 
Tuesday night until time of serv- 
ices. 



Funeral Services Held For 
Mrs. Ida Isabel Weekes 

Funeral services for MrB. Ida 
Isabel Weekes, who died Monday 
at Archer, were held Thursday af- 
ternoon tn the Archer L. D. . S. 
ward chapel. Mrs. Weekes, wife of 
John Weekes, had boen in poor 
health for several years. 

Bishop Sterling Macleby offi- 
ciated at the final rites. Burial 
was in the Archer cemetery. 

Opening musical number at the 
church services was, "We Lay 
Thee Down to Rest" by the ward 
choir, directed by Ephrlam Rora- 
rell, and accompanied by Agnfes 
Orr. E. L. Liljenquist offered the 
invocation. 

Merle Sewell and Norma Floyd, 
accompanied by Lillian Miner sang 
a duet, "In the Garden." Other 
musical numbers were "That Won- 
derful Mother of Mine*, 6ung by 
Everett Clay, who was accompan- 
ied by Budge Clay. 

A solo, "My Task", was render- 
ed by Ephriam Romrell, bxcoto- 
panied by Delores Grover; a piano 
solo, "Oh My Father," was giv- 
en by Hattie Rigby f and the choirV 
closing song waa ''Sometime We'll 
Understand." 

Ray Smith, a former Archer 
ward bishop, was the first speak- 
er. Florence Cheney, a family 
friend, paid tribute to Mrs. 
Weekes in a short address. Other 
speakers were Clarence WeekeB, 
Jack Miller, and the final speaker 
was Alma B. Larson, stake patri- 
arch. George Briggs pronounced 
the benediction. 



To this union eleven children wete 
born f eight of whom with Mr. 
Weekes, survive. They, are Isabel 
Nelson, Bertha Jeppson, Ursel 
Weekes, Opal Clements, Eldora 
Randall, Alta Weekes and Madona 
Pequiet, all of Archer^ and Maude 
Jeppson of Driggs. She is also sur- 
vived by 14 grandchildren and 
seven brothers. They are Elisha 
John, William, Vern, and Ray- 
mond Grover of Archer, and Seth 
and Clifford Grover of Idaho Falls. 
Mrs. Weekes was very active in 
civic and church affairs, especial- 
ly in the Relief Society work. 

She passed away at the family 
home Monday night, June 15. 

Mrs. Ida Isabel Weekes 

(Continued from page 1) 
Weekes, dedicated the grave. 

Flowers were carried by grand- 
children and neighbors of Mrs. 
Weekes, directed by Leona Byrne 
and Emma Sutton. 

Pallbearers were John, William, 
Seth, Vern, Raymond and Clifford 
Grover. E. F. Grover was an hon- 
orary pallbearer. All are broth- 
ers of Mrs. Weekes. 

Mrs. Weekes was born April 13, 
1874 at Grantsville, Utah, the 
daughter of Marshal Grover and 
Ida Isabel Orr. She lived with her 
parents at Grouse Creek, Utah un- 
til 1889 when she moved with her 
parents to Idaho, settling at \Ly- 
man. On November 20, 1894 she 
married John Weekes at Archer. 
This marriage was later solemniz- 
ed in the Logan L. D'. S. temple. 



67 



GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 




National Archives and Records Service 

Washington 25, D.C. 

Date March 5, 196 5 



Mrs. Opal W. Clements 
Route 1, Box 88 
Thornton, Idaho 83*4-53 

Inquiry: Information about Ida Weeks (or Mrs. John Weekes) and the post office 

at Sunnydell, Idaho. 
Dear Mrs. Clements: 

A reply to your inquiry will be found in the paraqraph(s) checked below. 



Sunnydell, Madison County, Idaho 

Established on February 15, 1900 
Discontinued on May 15, 1922 

Postmasters Date of Appointment 

Frederick H. Winters February 15, 1900 

Ella Young December 26, 1905 

Ida I. Weekes August 20, 1906 

John P. Burr September 10, 1909 

Oscar E. Mayhugi May 20, 1918 

John P. Burr May 12, 1919 

The United States Official Registers , published biennially, show 
that Mrs. Weekes was paid $64 for 1967 and $83 for 1909. Since 
Sunnydell was a 4th class office, Mrs. Weekes was appointed to 
her position by the Postmaster General. 

The postal records in our custody do not show the frequency of 
payment to postmasters or the mode and frequency of transportation 
of the mail to Sunnydell. 



68 




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69 



EARLY HISTORY OF THE SUNNYDELL AREA 

Cyrus B. Hawley, sitting with his back against his cabin observing the beauties of nature 
after a sudden summer shower, called to his pioneer wife to come and see a wonderful sight. 
From their promontory she looked across the valley. Tall sagebrush covered the land, for the 
most part, with knee-high grass gently swaying in the breeze reminding her of ocean waves. 
Along the northerly bend of the meandering South Fork of the Snake River grew a fringe of 
cottonwood trees. Cedars, willows and kinnikinic. Off in the distance a patch of pine trees stood 
tall and stately. On the other side of the river a dense forest, mostly cottonwood, grew on the old 
river bottoms. The scene reflected the mood of the sky. The sun, which had broken through the 
clouds, cast lights and shadows, making a picture of rare beauty and delight. "This land should 
be called Sunnydell," said Mr. Hawley. Mrs. Hawley agreed, and our corner of this beautiful 
valley was given a name. 

In 1871, two brothers, John and Albert Lyon, settled a short distance from the head of a 
creek known later as Lyman Creek. They were cattlemen. In 1873, J.F. Berry, a brother-in-law, 
joined them. He was a farmer and raised some crops in this area 

The summer of 1878 was extremely hot and dry, and that fall a prairie fire started near 
the present site of the Sunnydell schoolhouse. There was a sixty-mile-an-hour wind blowing and 
the fire swept the entire country up to Island Park and over to the Teton Basin in about forty- 
eight hours. The people saved their homesteads and part of their hay supply by plowing around 
their premises. 

The Lyon family became discouraged after the fire and left this area, leaving behind 
three members of their family who had passed away while they were living here The graves of 
these three constitute the only cemetery in Sunnydell - located east of the railroad tracks on the 
old John Taylor farm. Years ago the graves were marked by a little pole fence around them so 
people would know where they were, but there are no markers there now. 

Five years after the Lyon family moved from the area, the first permanent settlers came 
to the valley in the spring of 1 883 when Theodore K. Lyman and Silas Buckland settled at the 
mouth of this same creek. 

Mr. Lyman built his cabin on the south side of the creek and Mr. Buckland located on 
the north side. The creek was named. Lyman Creek for Mr. Lyman, as was also the LDS Ward, 
which, at that time, extended from near Rexburg some twelve miles South. 

One of the first two white children to be born in this territory was a daughter, Lois, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Silas Buckland; the other was a son, George Briggs Jr., born to the George Briggs 
family. 

It was in 1 883 that a Cyrus B. Hawley, given credit for naming our area Sunnydell, and 
his family came to make their home here. He, and his sons, Cyrus B. Jr., and Will, and sons-in- 
law, John Hillman and Isaac White, brought water from springs along the mountainside to their 
homesteads. These five homesteads had the right slope and warmth for growing excellent fruit, 
apples, pears, plums, apricots, cherries, strawberries and raspberries. This beautiful orchard 
was located on the farm that now belongs to Walt and Zella Bybee. 

These early settlers immediately set to work building crude log houses and clearing the 
land and preparing for winter. The houses were made of cottonwood logs with dirt floors and 
one opening for a door. They were so small and crowded that the beds were hung against the 
wall in the day to make room inside. And at night they hung the chairs on the walls to make 
room for the beds. 



70 



It was so cold and rainy the fall of 1 883 that the settlers worried about becoming ill from 
exposure to the elements, but they worked unitedly so that in a short time all were settled in a 
warm place, safe from the wild animals. The mothers worried about their children being 
snatched up by the coyotes who would come right into the dooryard and pick up chickens and 
eat them. 

Questions about the Indians in this area were often asked by the newcomers, but they 
were assured they only passed through to hunt and fish. The Indians said it was too cold for 
them in the Upper Snake River Valley-there were nine months of winter and three months of 
late fall! It has been noted by early settlers, however, that Round Top, called Fort Lyon at that 
time, was a favorite meeting place of the Indians for their Council Meetings. The first children 
in the area found arrowheads by the handfuls and of many different colors there. 

Everyone drove their cattle up on the hill to feed during the day on the grass which grew 
thick and tall for miles around Round Top. In the evening someone would have to go and bring 
the cows to be milked. One day as Cyrus Hawley was sitting on the hill looking for the cattle, 
he noticed a deer limping toward a pool of water. When it reached the pool it lay down and 
dangled its foot in the water. After this, he began to watch for the deer as he went to and from 
taking the cows. Many times he saw the animal, always repeating the water treatment. He 
finally investigated the pool and found it to be hot water with a mineral content. It was not long 
before the animal was healed and no longer limping. 

Mr. Hawley told a reporter about this incident and immediately a piece was written 
about it in the paper. A man living in Pocatello by the name of Mr. Heise read the paper and 
came up to investigate the place. He immediately filed a claim on the surrounding territory and 
established a health resort, which he operated for many years. 

Another early settler near the mouth of Lyman Creek was John Taylor. This was the 
very place for John-wonderful soil, close to the hills, and lots of timber nearby. During the 
summer he built a sawmill on Lyman Creek, half or a quarter of a mile back in. He dammed off 
the stream, making a small reservoir, releasing the water for irrigation purposes and also ran a 
water wheel, which he constructed to furnish power for his sawmill. He did some custom work 
sawing, but the mill was built with the thought in mind of getting lumber to build a home for his 
family. When his home was built, it was large and very nice. 

More industrious people moved to our area. A man with the last name of Kruger planted 
a very large orchard on the place where Blair Clay now lives. The orchard ran south from the 
old Hawley place over to Keith Clement's and then west to the railroad track. He later planted 
fruit trees on the west side of the track too. He had quite an acreage of apples and other kinds of 
fruits. Little Ike Smith and his family were hired to care for the farm and the orchard. A 
warehouse that is still standing was built near the tracks, and apples were shipped from it. Cider 
was also made and sold. Later, Clem Smith purchased the place and continued to care for the 
orchard and ship fruit for several years. 

Clarence Weekes recalls that the Jensen family, originally from Denver, Colorado, 
purchased 40 acres of sagebrush next to the Weekes family. When they moved to our area they 
had never farmed before, and were equipped with only their four horses and their bare hands. 
One of the first things they tried to do was fence their land. The horses were all being used to 
clear the land and get the crops planted, so Frank Jensen carried green cottonwood posts from 
down in the timber clear up to where the old Sunnydell school stood. They finally got their farm 
fenced and partly under cultivation. The barn and the house that they built after they were here a 
year or two were the best that there was in the community. They are still standing and are in 



71 



good condition. Six or eight years later, in the spring of 1919, the Magleby family purchased 
this land, and are still living there. 

Other early families coming to Sunnydell to settle were David A. Wilcox, Boyd Wilcox, 
Samuel A. Wilcox, Hillman's, Squires', Jim Byrne, Morgan's, Winters', Christensen's, Castle's, 
Beckstrom's, Kjelin's, Niederer's, Muir's, Marvin Book, Sidney Weekes, George Weekes and 
John Weekes. 

At first, the men took teams, shovels and scrapers, and went to work without much 
thought of permanent organization, but as more land was cleared and new settlers arrived, 
organization became a necessity. It was about 1886 when an organization known as the Lyman 
Irrigation Canal Company was formed. From the papers of John Weekes we quote: "In 1886 a 
survey was run from the river north for the purpose of getting out water to irrigate the lower land 
of Mr. Lyman, the Squires, Wilcox's, Butlers, Thompson's, and Payne's. In 1891 the water got 
through. A corporation was formed, and James Byrne made president with Boyd Wilcox, 
secretary." 

All the men who worked on this canal were interested in a team owned by James Byrne, 
named Buck and Deck. They each weighed between fourteen and fifteen hundred pounds. Buck 
was a buckskin, and Deck, an irony gray. No one around the country owned a finer team and 
none but the best teamsters were allowed to drive them. Ethan Young, John Weekes, and Archie 
Galbraith were among the favorites. This team was good on the plow, scraper, or rock boat but 
they did their most outstanding work at the head of the canal. At the command of their driver, 
they would swim the river, be it high or low, carrying a man, pulling a wagon or a cable to the 
island in the river. One day a boom was caught by the current and carried down stream some 
distance. Archie Galbraith, John Weekes, and Will Morgan took the team and went after it. The 
men tied a cable about six feet back from the head of the boom, hooked the team to it and started 
up the river-the team was pulling from the bank. When they came to a bend in the river, a stiff 
current caught the head of the boom and was forcing it out into the head of the stream. The river 
bank at this point was some 4 ft. high and the water was from 8 to 10 feet deep. Buck and Deck 
set their feet firmly in the gravely soil, but were slowly being dragged backward with the force of 
the current. 

John Weekes, who could always think quickly in an emergency, ran back along the boom 
to where he could jump onto the bank. He ran to the team, and cut Buck's tug with a pocketknife. 
As the singletree fell back, the clip was jerked off the other end. This threw all the load on Deck, 
who pulled with all his might until the single-tree broke, releasing both horses. The men 
watching, breathed a sigh of relief, for had the team been pulled backward down the bank and 
into the deep water, no human power could have saved them. 

There were many discouraging times ahead. Excavating the canal was easy work 
compared to maintaining its head. Often the men worked all winter, only to have their 
accomplishments washed away by high water in the spring; or the temperamental Snake might 
change its course somewhat and, after spring floods, the water flow would drop so low that the 
canal would be left high and dry when the water was most needed. John Weekes recalled 
working thirty-two continuous days to get the water back in the canal in time to save the crops. 

It was hard work on the men working waist-deep in the water to force the stream from 
washing out their headings. Scarcely a day passed when a life was not endangered by this 
precarious task. Even the strongest men became discouraged. There came a day when David 
Wilcox was the only man on the job. After work he reported to President James Byrne, who 
said. "Stay with it, Dave, and I'll stay with you". Finally, in 1891 the water got through. 



72 



The first school was held in the home of Sam Wilcox. Sam's wife, Julia, was the first 
teacher and they had only one room. The next year, Silas Buckland let them use his granary for 
one term. The following summer Dave Wilcox and Silas Buckland went to the hills and got out 
logs and built a little log school where the Sunnydell School now stands. After a few years of 
service, this building was replaced by a new rock building. The rock was quarried up on the 
hill six miles east. Later a petition was put in the school building which made two rooms, then 
they were able to have two teachers. In March 1930, this building burned and the term was 
finished in the lumber yard building at Byrne Siding. The next year school was held in the new 
rock building. The same rock was used and more added, which came from the same quarry. A 
lovely two-room school was built with a full basement, that was used as an amusement hall and 
for dances, basketball and banquets. 

Although this is the first time there has been a ward organized in Sunnydell, for many 
years after the school house was built, church meetings were held in the school as a 
convenience for the people who lived in this area. Time was taken from school hours for 
Primary and for several years there were two Primary presidencies and organizations in the 
Archer Ward - one at Archer and one at Sunnydell. Pearl Weekes recalls two instances when 
Sister Mary Liljenquist was Primary President at Sunnydell. "We had many, many socials, 
dances and parties of all kinds. The last of Sister Liljenquists parties I remember, she asked 
that we make a freezer of ice cream. I did, and when she went to get it to serve, Erastus 
Weekes, Blaine Liljenquist and some of the other boys had taken it down to her home and were 
eating it. She found them down there and she made them pay for it!'' 

Another time Sister Liljenquist had the braiding of the May Pole over to her place. 
Some of the children got playing in the canal there and fell in the water. She used some 
blankets to wrap them in, washed their clothes and she had a mangle (iron) there and pressed 
them. After that, they still went on with their May Pole." 

Sister Weekes tells about the dances that were held in the Sunnydell School. "Henry 
Taylor, who just recently celebrated his 90 th birthday, used to play the violin and his daughter 
Neta played the piano for the dances. Once in a while Delos Nelson would spell Henry off with 
the violin. I remember a polygamist dance that they danced up there once-the only time I've 
ever seen it. One man would take two ladies and dance with them. Ivy and I had the privilege of 
dancing with Selar Cheney that way." 

The Sunnydell School was used until the consolidation of the schools, after which it 
stood idle for some six years. It was then converted into a beautiful home by Ezra and May 
Liljenquist. 

In 1915, a branch of the Oregon Short Lines Railroad was built through Sunnydell along 
the hill and the siding named Byrne was built at the time. Corey Brother's Construction did the 
work on the railroad, and they had a railroad camp down just East of where Steve Sutton lives. 
All the grading work was done with horses and mules. The story is told by Ellis Wilcox that one 
thing he remembers about the railroad being built was that one of the crew got a little 
despondent and sat down on a rock, put a blasting cap in his mouth and lit it. 

At one time Byrne Siding was supposed to become a town as big as Ririe. 
Although it never did quite make it, it was the location of several businesses. There were two 
section houses built at the siding for the railroad crew to live ~ and a small depot. That same fall 
the Sugar Company built a high-line beet dump and began receiving beets there. 

The following year, Oscar E. Mayhugh built a store, which he opened for business in 
November. Land was purchased from D. A. Wilcox on which to build. A lumber yard, run by 



73 



John Buckland also was built in 1917, and joined the store. They handled a large stock of 
lumber and some hardware. 

In July 1917, a grain elevator was built across the tracks from the store called the Inter- 
Ocean Company, later changed to Midland Elevator Grain Company. Delmo Cook was one of 
the early operators of this elevator. 

There was also three potato cellars built at the siding for handling area potatoes for 
shipment, and in July, 1931, C. H. Manwaring built coal bins large enough to hold two car loads 
of grain there. 

As the years have come and gone, the existence of Sunny dell has become almost extinct. 
Many of the new people in the area are probably not even aware that such a place ever existed 
But to the people who have lived in this special spot-this Sunnydell, as Mr. Hawley so nicely 
named it—having recalled from their past to once again distinguish the beautiful place they live 
is a very exciting and special event. 

The other evening as I visited with my father and the Weekes, they recalled a Fourth of 
July many years ago when Archer and Sunnydell met together for some friendly athletic 
competition. From young to old, the Sunnydell participants walked away with all the honors. I 
am here today to tell Archer Ward to watch out-Sunnydell will rise again! ! ! (and it did) 

Special thanks for source Material: Myrtle Kennington, Letha Wilcox, 
Ellis Wilcox and Pearl and Clarence Weekes. 

Compiled by Mae Niederer 



74 





Family Group Record- 


4294 


Page 1 of 1 


Husband 


Marshall Leslie WEEKES-6109 






Bom 


16 Nov 1895 Place Sunnydell, Fremont, ID 

Place 




LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr 


Baptized 5Jun1904 


Died 
Buned 


2 Dec 1918 i Place Camp Kearny, California 

Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison. Idaho 




Endowed 26 Mar 1919 

SealPar 21 Oct 1896 


LOGAN 
LOGAN 


Married 


Place 




SeaISp 


Husbands father John Samuel WEEKES-777 
Husband-smother Ida Isabel GROVER-6308 




MRIN: 1721 


Wife 


unmarried 






Bom 
Chr 


Place 
Place 




LDS ordinance dates 
Baptized 


Temple 


Died 
Buned 


Place 
I Place 




Endowed 
SealPar 


Wife's father 




- 




Wife's mother 








Marshall Leslie Weeke 








6 Jan 2006 



75 



MARHSALL LESLIE WEEKES 

Leslie was the oldest in the family of eleven children of John Samuel and Ida Isabel 
Grover Weekes. He was born November 16, 1895 at Sunnydell, Fremont Co., Idaho in the home 
of his parents. It was a small log home that his father had built before he was married. Father 
took pride in the fact that there were no cracks between the boards in the floor. 

Leslie was a beautiful baby with dark hair and was loved by his parents. He was good- 
natured and as he grew older he was quiet and of gentle nature. He enjoyed quiet games, music 
and reading. He had a friendly attitude, was never quarrelsome or inclined to be mischievous. 
Sy Olsen, a close friend of our parents said of him, "I liked Leslie because he was so considerate. 
He always spoke to the older people. He was a very gentle person." Leslie learned to work 
early. There were many tasks he could and did do to help his parents. He was a hard worker and 
always followed directions. There was no need to follow up or check to see if his work was 
completed. 

He enjoyed plain foods, he did not eat much meat or spicy food. He enjoyed the cakes, 
cookies and mincemeat or apple pies his mother used to make. 

When he completed school in the district he and a cousin, Charles Weekes, went to Ricks 
Academy. Among other classes, he took a missionary course, with plans to serve a mission. He 
had close friends and often brought Earl Stacey, Silas Cheney or others home for Sunday dinner. 

His plans for life were changed early in 1918, when he was drafted into the army due to 
World War I. He was needed so badly to help on the farm. However, he was sent to Camp 
Kearney for training in the Army and placed in the 1 1 th company, 3 r battalion of the 166 1 depot 
brigade. 

In October he was permitted to come home on a furlough due to an operation for 
appendicitis. His parents had not been informed of his surgery. He wasn't well enough to take 
the rugged training of army life, so he was given a short time to recuperate and regain his health 
and strength. It was a joy to have him home for a few days. 

Shortly after he returned to California the folks received a telegram saying that he was 
critically ill with influenza. The epidemic was severe both in California and in Idaho. Several 
people in our area passed away because of it. 

When the telegram came, telling of his critical condition the folks were very concerned 
and upset. Mother couldn't possibly go to see him as she was expecting her eleventh child 
anytime. Isabel was on her mission in Kansas, it was winter, there were chores to do and stock 
to feed. It was late November. It was such a worry, father and mother both wanted to go see 
Leslie. There was little time to worry about it however. On December 2, 1918 the telegram 
came saying Leslie had passed away at Camp Kearney. His Chaplin sent a letter of condolence, 
which is included at the end of this history. 

Leslie's body was sent home on the train. There was no plane service at the that time. 
Father met the train at Thornton and brought the body home. The casket was put in the front 
room of their home. It had been draped with a flag. They opened the casket and saw Leslie 
dressed in a new Army uniform. 

Due to the epidemic, people who had it were quarantined and no meetings were held. We 
were able to have a short graveside service. Leslie's passing, coming so soon after Lyman's, 
was one of life's hardest experiences for the family. He had received his patriarchal blessing on 
9 August 1915. The closing statement says, "You shall have treasures in heaven and inherit life 
in the worlds to come. Be faithful that you may receive these blessings." He was in very deed 
faithful and worthy of the promised blessings. 

Written by Opal Weekes Clements 
76 



Headquarters Twenty-First Infantry 



1 st Lt. WILBUR C- HALLENBECK 
Chaplain 



Camp Kearny, California. 
December 5, 1916. 



My de^r Mr, Weeks: 

I was asked by the Adjutant of the Base Hospital to 
hold a brief funeral service for your son because the organ- 
izationto which he belonged had no Chaplain. T7e had the service 
yesterdry afternoon just before the body was shipped as you 
requested. I was very glad that I could do it and I wish that 
you might have been here. I read the 23rd Psalm and parts of 
the 14th chapter of the Gospel according to John and the 11th 
chapter of I Thessalonians, then I offered a prayer for the 
EiLks at home and for those of us that were there that we 
might be better men because of the memory of your son. 

My heart goes out to you in this hard experience 
and It is my prayer that you will turn to our Heavenly 
Father for the strength and comfort that He alone can give 
at such a time as this. He has promised that He will never 
give us a burd ,n to bear that He will net et the same time 
give us the strength to bear and His promises never fail. 

It will be a comfort to you to know that everything 
thrt was possible wa done for your son while he was in the 
hospital and I know that he had everything that he needed and 
that he desired. 

If there is anything that I could do for you I am 
sure that I would be more than glad to do it. 

Now the G-od of peace that brought again from the dead 
our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, through the 
blood of the everlasting covenant, m ake you perfect in every 
good Hork to do His will, working in you that which is well- 
pleasing in His sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory 
for ever and ever, Amen. 



Sincerely yours, 
Chaplain 21st. Infantry. 



77 



RICKS ACADEMY 

A. B. CHRI8TENSON. Pimncihl 

HEXBURG IDAHO 




7U*. C>ss~<L VH^. CU-^vw -O^uJUo ; 

f ^u ~~ \ &• - — • 4 °*^tiJ* «r- -w 



cLA^t^t^cx>Ci^ 1 ^' 



0^k|aAtCUMX 



78 



RICKS ACADEMY 

A. B. CHUHTINSON. PmworAi. 

REXBURG IDAHO 



u ^jJL i O^d jfM- tLcJr <U<^C^ ^n^^c *-T* 



79 



Family Group Record- 2123 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband George Francis NELSON-6253 




Bom 26 Auq 1896 ! Place Weston, Franklin, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Chr. Place 


Baptized 


1 Jul 1906! 


Died 6 Sep 1985 j Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


22 Dec 1915 j LOGAN 


Buried 8 Sep 1985 Place Sutton Cemetery Archer, Madison. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC! 


Married 6 Feb 1929 I Place LOGAN. Cache. Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


6 Feb 1929 I LOGAN 


other spouse Susan Elizabeth WEEKES-9520 




MRIN: 2193 


Married 22 Dec 1915 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


22 Dec 1915T SLAKE 


other spouse Alice Malinda LAYCOCK-9521 




MRIN: 2194 i 


Married 1 Apr 1954 I Place Idaho, Falls, IdahoFalls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


i 




other spouse Thelma Lucille CARLSON-1 0794 




MRIN: 2209 I 




Married 4 Dec 1969 ! Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


! I 

i | 




other spouse Mary Lilly Bayliff BRIGGS- 10795 




MRIN: 4272 




Married 4 Sep 1976 I Place Archer, Madison, Idaho (seaisp 




Husband's father Nels NELSON-9518 




MRIN 2195 I 


Husbands mother Hannah Robinson Brown GILL-9519 






wife Susan Isabel WEEKES-61 1 




Bom 18 Apr 1898 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont (Now Mad, ID 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr 


Place 


Baptized 


1 Jul 1906 






Died 8 Nov 1953 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, ID 


Endowed 


4 Jan 1918 


IFALL 




Buried 12 Nov 1953 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






other spouse John JENSEN-1 0406 




MRIN: 2124! 


L. ., , 


Married 3 ADr 1925 (D) ! Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake, Utah I seaisp 


3 Apr 1925 i SLAKE 


wife's father John Samuel WEEKES-777 




MRIN: 1721 ! 


wife's mother Ida Isabel GROVER-6308 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M i Ross WEEKES-9522 




Bom 13 Apr 1922 


Place Sunnydell, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 May 1930J 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


27 Auq 1957 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Auq 1957 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Beulah Elizabeth RICKS-9526 




MRIN: 3749 i 


I 


Married 5JuM945 i Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


27 Aua 1957! IFALL I 


M ! Dennis W NELSON-9523 




Bom 19 Jan 1930 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


5Feb193?L 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


18 Nov 1948 


IFALL 




Died | Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried ! Place 






Spouse Rita JOHNSON-9527 




MRIN: 3750 


Married 18 Nov 1948 I Place Idaho, Falls. IdahoFalls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


I 


M ! Reid W NELSON-9524 




Bom 23Jun1934 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1942! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


23 Jul 1953 | IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Elma Darlene KLINGER-9528 






MRIN: 3751 




Married 23 Jul 1952 (D) I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


23 Jul 1952 


IFALL I 




spouse Diane TUCKER-1 0793 




MRIN: 2210 j 


i 


Mamed 13 Sep 1980 I Place Pocatello, Bannock. Idaho 


SeaISp 




M 


John W NELSON-9525 




Bom 25 Dec 1935 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


31 Dec 1943 I 




Chr. Place 


Endowed 


29 Jun 1955 


IFALL i 




Died 25 Mar 1983 Place Idaho, Falls, IdahoFalls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 




Buried 29 Mar 1983 ! Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


s 


^spouse Nikki Lou ORMOND-9529 




MRIN: 3752 j 


I 


Married 29 Jun 1955 ! Place Idaho. Falls. IdahoFalls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


29 Jun 1955! IFALL I 



80 



11 Feb 2006 




The George and Isabel Weekes Nelson Family 
Top: back-l-r- Chester, Glenna, Dennis, Zula, Lynn (these are George & Susan's children, a first marriage). 
Front- George, Reid, John, Isabel. Below left & middle - Isabel Weekes Nelson, and George Nelson. 




81 



AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF SUSAN ISABEL WEEKES 

I was born April 18, 1898, at Sunny Dell, Idaho, approximately 2 blocks west of the barn 
in a log house built by my father to take his bride into at the time of their marriage. It was a very 
humble, but scrupulously clean home. Leslie was the first child to bless that lovely abode. I was 
a strange looking person, having to wear a hood or bonnet for many months because my hair was 
light and needed a beauty treatment, but it was not available. My eyes were greenish gray, 
otherwise I looked like the remainder of the family. 

I was taken to Sunday School early, as my mother taught Sunday School and sang 
extensively at that time. Then Lyman blessed our home and we three children made it very 
trying and hard for Father and Mother to continue the clearing of their land of sage. They 
planted currants, gooseberries, native currants, pie plant, white and red raspberries and 
strawberries along the yard and house. The shrubs consisted of old man and old woman, which 
we loved to have and smell, as it was highly perfumed. We also enjoyed iris, small and large, 
purple and yellow pansies and lilacs. 

Father used to plow and then Mother and we three would go out and pick and pile sage in 
huge piles. We worked hard and long to get to see the big fires at night. Even the neighbors 
would come to see the evening of fire and fun. It was a lovely scent that all pioneers loved - that 
of burning sage. Often we children were put on horses and would tie rope to the harness or 
horse's tail and drag sage out of the ground and to the pile. 

When I was 5 or 6 years old, I slid off the old bay mare and sprained my right arm and 
elbow. I had a few very painful weeks. I could not eat or sleep for pain. My arm was terribly 
swollen, but Grandma Wiley said it wasn't broken and would mend. 

Then Father built a two-room log house out by the road just south of our home. How I 
remember moving into that. Then I remember each child's birth after Bertha, Sister Wiley in her 
little calico dress and dainty white apron. Also, I remember when Leslie broke his arm and 
Sister Wiley came and set his arm and put splints on it. She had a little blacktop buggy and gray 
horse. She did her own harnessing and hitching up and came along to bring her assistance to all 
who sought her help. 

As a child of about 8 years I remember my Grandfather, Sidney Weekes, riding Old 
Prince down through the field from about where Cycifs corral now stands - just a little to the 
east - to our house. At meal time, if we left a crust of bread or morsel of food on our plates, he 
would say, "Waste not, want not." I have tried to teach my children that bit of pioneer thrift. 
When we were ill he came to administer to us. We were all very happy. 

One spring, when Bertha and Maude were about 2 and 3 years old, Father bought fruit 
trees. He plowed the ground just west of the house, marked the spots, and Mother, the 2 boys, 
and we 3 girls would dig holes and pour water in them. When Pa came home from working on 
the canal he would plant trees. He made a Go Devil (a wooden platform with wooden runners) 
and put a barrel of waier on it from the well he had finished digging that spring. The well was 
just 50 yards northwest of the present location of the garage. We hitched Old May to the Go 
Devil and watered the trees, raspberries and strawberries. They were north in the yard from the 
granary. 

Then my school days with Leslie, my very adorable big brother, started in the log school 
house at Sunny Dell School. Mr. Gray, about 50 years old, was my teacher. He had a liking for 
my lovely, clean and neatly laundered dresses. When I'd go to read or spell he would put his feet 



82 



up on his desk, put his arm around me and say, "Now Isabel, my girl, you read nice." (How 1 
hate him.) 

After finishing school at Sunny Dell, I went to the wild cat location. It was a two-room 
log house where Howard Erickson now lives. Our teacher, Mr. Johnson, was a transient who 
stayed at Mark Young's old home. Then I attended school at the old dance hall south of Rob 
Young's old home. 

Many a lovely experience graced our day during these school days. I had a wonderful 
religion class. My teacher. Brother Carl G. Maser, was a great man. Brother Niels Christensen, 
our Sunday School Superintendent, lived where Bertha Jeppson's farm now stands. He taught 
me to bear my testimony. I recall Alf Higgin's and Charles Brigg's rock quarry east of Byrne 
Siding and the rock that was hauled by our home. It was used to build homes and our new rock 
chapel. 

I remember Jack Wiley, Henry Taylor, and Oris Wilcox and their violin and organ music. 
Oh, those good old dances. I remember John E. Wilcox and his stump speeches - THE 
AMSTER DAM, HESSY DAM, AND THE DAM DAM - in the old log church just north of 
Mark Young's home. 

While still in the log house in the fall before Opal was born (1910), there were so many 
obligations to meet, that by December there wasn't anything left for Santa Claus to have. So, 
December 25 l came and there was only a cedar tree set in a ten gallon milk can that greeted us 
on that morning. After chores were done and eggs gathered, with a little bit of change, the team 
was hitched to the sleigh and Leslie, Lyman and I went to George Briggs store to buy a present 
for all the family - even a lovely flowered bowl for Mother, a mouth organ for Father, candy and 
nuts, mugs and hankies for the children, and one pair of stockings for the baby. 

On January 17, 1910, Opal came to bless our home. I stayed home from school to help 
out and Grandma Grover came and stayed one night. It was the only time she ever stayed with 
us. When Mother was up and feeling better, Father had a goiter and so went to Logan in late 
February to go to the temple and for his health. I went with him. It was my first ride on the 
train. We met Uncle Harry and Aunt Sarah Munns and their family. 

I learned to milk early because of necessity. Father had to work away to get feed and 
seed and Mother and us had to do the chores. 

One winter, when the Sunny Dell Canal was being made, Aunt Martha stayed with us 
while Father and Uncle Rob worked up by the old Hawley place. 

The first apples we had as children came from the John Taylor and Jim Byrne places - 
they were two great friends of ours. 

The first telephone I ever used was at Lew Byrne's rock house - now Rulon Wilcox's. I 
walked or rode a horse there to call the doctor for Mother. 

We had the Post Office at our home while I was young and many neighbors came and 
spent many happy hours in our home. 

When Mother's sister, Caroline, died in January the folks decided to build a new house. 
On April 1 st , Freeman Mclntire and Lon Johnson came and staked off the dimensions and began 
the foundation. Father gave them a team of mules. Jack and Flory, for building the house. We 
children couldn't drive the mules, because when Jack got hungry or noon came, he just went to 
the house-plow, harrow, scraper, and all-just went! 

I helped haul much of the material from C.W.M. Company. Mr. Duffin was the operator. 
Leslie and Lyman would drive teams at home and Father and I would go for lumber and cement. 
We'd take one four-horse team and one two-horse team. Many times it was eleven o'clock at 



83 



night when we'd get home. We always went over the hill north of Sutton's dugway and would 
come out east of Ricks College. 

I drove Old Dan and Fan on the white top buggy to Canyon Creek to get Bertha from 
school (1923) and while coming down this dugway something went wrong. Henry Larson and 
someone else on the road saw our plight and caught the horses by the bit and we were saved 
from terrible disaster. The Lord has protected me many times. 

Now, back a year or so. When I was fourteen years old, I used to go out and work where 
people needed housework done, and sickness, and it was then that my heart was touched and 
made very tender and humble, because people would ask me to assist with their confinements. 
Fd wash and dress babies and care for the mothers and families, doing all the work in the home 
and sit up nights to care for the baby. If I could recall all the places, there are few homes I've 
missed being in - in sickness or present at time of death. For these long and trying hours I am 
thankful. I have many friends here and over there because of the help of the Lord. In recalling 
all of these my heart has a prayer of thanksgiving to my Heavenly Father. Not ever have I been 
in charge of care of mother and baby and lost one in death. This is in answer to my humble 
prayers. Names of homes I helped I will list here and then continue. The number indicates 
number of babies I helped deliver. 



Frank Butler 


3 


Dennis Nelson 


1 


Joe Hunsaker 


2 


Lillis Sutton 


2 


Claude Buckland 


1 


Clarence Hoopes 


2 


Thomas Dalling 


1 


Melvin Smith 


1 


Clarence Beck 


1 


Brother Smith 


1 


Henry Luthy 


1 


McFates 


1 


Lovel Orr 


9 


Henry Erickson 


1 


Carl Johnson 


2 


Linus Burns 


1 


Mark Young miscarriage 


Herb Galbraith 


2 


Lily Briggs 


1 


Cecil Larson 


1 


Lynn Nelson 


1 


Harry Dean 


1 


Grant Bowen 


2 


Willard Longhurst 


3 


Milton Squires 


2 


John Grover 


3 or 4 


Glen Squires 


1 


Clifford Grover 


2 


Ethan Young 


2 


Eldon Robison 


1 


Alph Young 


2 


Herman Erickson 


2 or 3 


Henry Whitaker, Jr. 


2 


Sr. Whittaker 


3 


Seth Grover 


2 


Lucein Young 


2 


George Sharp 


8 


Anthony 


1 


Florence Luthy 


2 


Duglas Duglas 


1 


Edith Sharp 


3 


Snell Rigby 


2 


Clara Hunsaker 


2 


Rulon Neiderer 


2 


Wayne Cheney 


1 


Zula 


1 


Lawrence Eames 


2 


Glenna 


1 


Sam Kennington 


2 











During my childhood, and always since, we look forward to the outing that became a 
seasonal pleasure for the family. Just prepare, pack up, and go huckleberrying. Many trips stand 
out, especially when I took Glenna and the children, Uncle Rob and Aunt Martha, Emma, Elisha, 
Brother and Sister Jeppson, and my folks. Uncle Rob took the Shetland pony and they all 
enjoyed riding it. John, Reid and Dennis were always good babies to take. Everyone enjoyed 
them, they were so easy to get along with, as were the girls. Chester and Lynn were larger and 
always enjoyed thoroughly their riding or trailing Uncle Ike. 

I have enjoyed making hot bread and candy and cooking for them while we were away. 
We enjoyed picking fast and getting buckets full. Zula was such a hustler and Reid and John 
were not to be beaten by anyone. 



84 



Once I walked about ten miles. No one knew I was alone until I arrived in camp. Father 
would let us take horses and go riding. If we'd take Old Joe, our pony, and let him lead the way, 
we were never lost. 

The time we took Herb and Minnie Williams and Sister Johnson she had such a lovely 
time and enjoyed all of our nonsense. Now, Lyle and Susan and the rest of the grandchildren. 
Big Pa and Ma, go to the big hill and get berries. Even in the winter our grandchildren are so 
adorable to take care of. 

So, we come to the time when Lyman was so ill, and we had a trying time while Father 
and Mother were away. He was a lovely brother, so likeable and such a tease. Dennis is very 
much like him. 

I went to Ricks Academy and took the missionary course. 

(The original hand-written copy of this autobiography is in the possession of Isabel's son, Reid 
Nelson.) 

A Tribute written for Susan Isabel Weekes 
She helped her Fellowmen 

6 Nov. 1953, by Afton Florence Cheney 

Some of us may live here many, many years, 

And then others will find their time less long. 

Our dear Father knows the reason for our tears, 

And He also knows the reason for our song. 

And whether we shall go, or whether we may stay, 

It's very good to know we helped our fellowman. 

Where'er we stepped along this, our Life's Highway. 

I'm sure she more than cared, when she saw the ill, 

For she lent them her helping hand, with good will. 

Where there was great need she was not always told. 

But she was swift to see and to understand, 

And come to aid with a zeal and courage bold. 

She made a lovely home for her closer kin. 

And she invited in many of her friends, 

To share her pleasure of a lovely thing. 

That only warmth and love and strict duty lends. 

She went to the temples to do work for those passed on. 

But now the Master bids her come - for her, He sends, 

To cross this life's portal to His great beyond. 



85 



SUSAN ISABEL WEEKES NELSON 

Isabel was born in the home of her parents, John Samuel and Ida Isabel Grover Weekes, 
on the 18 th of April 1898, at Sunny Dell, Idaho. She was a special delight to her parents, for she 
was their first daughter. She had one older brother, Leslie. She was given the name of Isabel in 
honor of her mother, Ida Isabel, and her grandmother Isabel Orr Grover, and Susan for Susan 
Pilgrim Weekes. 

She was a lively little girl, quick to think and act. She was baptized and confirmed a 
member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on July 1, 1906. She was baptized by 
George Briggs Jr. in a canal near the Briggs home. Olaf P. Johanson confirmed her. 

Isabel's early years were busy ones, she being the oldest daughter of parents who were 
homesteading land and establishing their new home. She was the "big sister" for six sisters and 
three younger brothers. Of necessity, she assumed much responsibility. There was always 
cooking, cleaning, washing, and ironing to be done. At an early age she learned to do all of 
these and many other things. Outside there was work in the yard, garden and flowers, berries to 
pick, chickens to feed, eggs to gather and wood and coal to carry - which kept the home cozy 
and warm. There was never an idle moment. Her teacher, our dear Mother, was the very finest. 
In addition to becoming skillful, she became a good organizer of workers and work to be 
accomplished. We girls used to feel sometimes, when Mother was away from home, that Isabel 
was a hard task-mistress. Our work had to meet her standard, which was always high. Often 
there was a bit of friction when we failed to clean the corners or do our work well. Things had 
to be put in their proper place, not just stacked up in a corner. Personally, I had a real rough 
time learning to hold the broom in its proper position while I swept the floor and was checked 
on closely. Today, I appreciate the effort she and Mother exhibited in my behalf, even though I 
am negligent about making application of it. I must say we had two of the finest teachers to be 
found anywhere. 

Part of the time during her youth, Isabel attended church meetings in the branch at 
Sunny Dell where her parents took an active part. She went to school in the same rock school 
building, which was about a mile south and east of our home. In good weather she walked with 
other children; on stormy, cold days, Father would take the children in a sleigh, buggy or on 
horseback. He often rode one horse with a child or two and two or three other children on 
another horse. This required much less of Father's time than harnessing, hooking up; and 
driving a team. 

In the seventh and eighth grades, Isabel attended a school known as the "Wild Cat 
College", with Mr. Nutt as teacher. The schoolhouse was on a knoll south of the home 
presently (1978) owned by Norman S. Erickson. Today, the spot is enclosed by pine trees. 

When the time arrived for her to go to high school, she attended Ricks Academy. It was 
customary for students to have summer projects as part of their courses. In this way they made 
application of facts learned. Work was planned and supervised by teachers of the academy. In 
my (Opal Clements) Book of Remembrance I have a clipping taken from the Rexburg Journal- 
The "I Remember the Good Old Days" section - which listed events of fifty years previous. The 
clipping reads as follows: "Mark Austin this week gave $200 in prizes to students of Ricks 
College for work done during the summer. The following students received awards: Isabel 
Weekes of Archer - $50 for the best acre of potatoes, 590 bushels." Other students were then 
listed. 

As a young woman, Isabel served a mission in the Central States Mission. After her 
mission, she was living with her folks in Archer. Her dad had a hired man by the name of 



86 



Joseph Giordano. As time went on, he fathered Isabel's son Ross. Ross spent his growing up 
years with John and Ida. 

Isabel served as a teacher for the girls in M.I. A. She exhibited interest in them, taking 
them on trips and making her class interesting with other varied activities as well as teachings. 
She also served as president of the YWMIA. 

I recall during my teenage years seeing John Jensen, a tall, reserved, fine-looking 
young man from Lyman, Idaho, call at our home for Isabel. He was one of the children, the 
only son, of Nels Jensen, and a returned missionary. John drove the family car, a large 
luxurious one, each time he came. Their courtship blossomed and they were married in the 
Salt Lake Temple on April 3, 1925. 

Since John lived and farmed with his father, he was persuaded to live in part of the 
family home. It was a large rock home, and still stands in Lyman today, (1978), bringing sad 
memories and heartache to me each time I pass. Being large, perhaps it should have sheltered 
two families. It could easily have done so, except for opposition between family members. It was 
a kind and all wise Heavenly Father who gave counsel to his children in Genesis 2:24, and His 
Son, again in Matthew 2:24, Matthew 19:5, and Mark 10:7, where they state: "Therefore, shall a 
man leave his father and mother and shall cleave unto his wife." It seemed hard, as it often does, 
to share the love and devotion of their son with another woman, his wife, and allow them the 
privilege of establishing a new home. Heartaches and misery mounted. Grievances developed 
into serious problems, casting away the joy and happiness that marriage should bring. It was 
very sad, indeed, that John couldn't have taken Isabel into a home of their own, where they could 
have known the peace and joy that should have been theirs, without interference. Instead, 
troubles arose between other members of John's family and made it very hard for them to be 
happy. Due to jealousy, they faced more problems each day, until it became unbearable, making 
it seem best to Isabel, John, and their Bishop to have the marriage dissolved, even though it had 
been a temple marriage. They separated to satisfy the family. A temple divorce was granted 
January 3, 1928. 

Isabel's nurses training now took her back into the homes where her services were 
needed. In that day, babies arrived at home with the assistance of a doctor and nurse or a 
midwife, rather than at the hospital. Isabel's services were very much in demand and she would 
move in with the family and care for the whole family until the mother was back on her feet. 
Because she spent so much time in the homes of those she was assisting, it seemed advisable that 
her young son, Ross, who was a lively little fellow, quick as a wink, should stay with Mother 
and Father, where he was loved and well cared for. 

During the month of October 1927, sadness came to George Nelson and his family. His 
wife, Susan, passed away after the birth of a baby girl, Glenna, who was born November 1 . 
1927. Glenna had an older sister, Zula and brothers Chester and Lynn. George feared for the loss 
of the baby as well as her mother. He gave her a name and a special blessing November 3 r . 
Much in need of help to care for the baby and the other little children, George asked Isabel to 
come to his home and assist there. Through many prayers and tender loving care Glenna lived: 
was a beautiful baby who was loved by everyone. Isabel's assistance was appreciated and 
needed. George invited her to become the mother of his children and his wife. In time she 
accepted, and they were married in the Logan Temple on February 6, 1 929. Her son, Ross, was 
sealed to them the same day. 

Their home, which was a small two-room log building, was located directly north of the 
present home of Chester and Ina Nelson, on property belonging to Susan's parents - just a few 
rods east of their home. It was a small home for a family of six, so they decided to move into one 
on property George was buying. It was about a quarter of a mile along the street. They moved 



87 



and began to establish a new home there. As had always been the case, Isabel's service was 
needed in other homes and she went where or whenever she was called, with no thought of 
remuneration she'd receive. That made no difference in the quality of her work. She gave the 
same sweet service, regardless of the fact that they were much in need of extra funds at this time. 
Times were hard during the early 1930's for everyone, even under normal circumstances. 
However, in Isabel's absence, George and the children exerted extra effort. It was in answer to a 
call that took Isabel from her home, that a real challenge came to George and Isabel. 

In the early morning hours of March 23, 1930, Isabel was at the home of her Uncle, Cliff 
Grover, helping with the arrival of a new baby, Stanley Mack. George arose earlier than usual to 
do the chores and get the older children ready for school. Dennis was a couple of months old, 
and Glenna was about three. Chores had to be done so George could take care of them until 
Isabel returned home. Life was like that quite often at their home. Soon George was called by the 
excited children who told him that the house was on fire. 

Wallboard around the hot chimney had caught fire and was blazing. Fire spread rapidly 
and flames consumed the house. Fortunately, the children were all saved. However, it was early 
morning and George was alone so little else was saved. They were without a home! 

George's previous home had been rented to the Jack Smith family, who could not move 
until a floor was laid in Mrs. Smith's father's old home. It was George who put the floor in so 
that his own house could be vacated and moved. The move was necessary so he could be near 
his animals and work. He had no corral or barn near his first home. It was small to serve the 
family of six so more rooms had to be added. Therefore, it was moved onto his own ground. 
Isabel's father gave them a one-roomed building which was on his dry farm in Herbert. This 
made three rooms instead of two when it was moved and made a part of the new home. 

Life was hard; certainly they were crowded, but times were hard for everyone during the 
early thirties, even without the loss of their home. There was nothing else to do except to work 
even harder in order to make payments and obligations and save what they could to build a new 
home some time in the future. Discouragements mounted. It took time to get organized and make 
the adjustment. Each spring there was a rush to clean the barns and corrals, fertilize the land for 
beets so they could be planted early. Other crops had to be planted then, without a break, the 
beets had to be thinned, cultivated and hoed. It was a steady routine of hard work and Isabel was 
both outside and inside to help with work that had to be done. She worked real hard. This was a 
period of severe discouragement and adversity for George, Isabel and the children. They all 
worked without ceasing. 

Recently, in 1 977, as Keith visited George as his Home Teacher, George told him how 
much he had appreciated Isabel's father's encouragement and advice. He had told them that if 
they'd work hard and pay an honest tithing that the Lord's promise given in Malachi 3:8-12 
where he says: "Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse and prove me now, herewith, sayeth 
the Lord of Hosts, if I will not open the windows of Heaven and pour you out a blessing, that 
there shall not be room enough to receive it." Father had a firm testimony of the blessings 
received from the payment of a full tithing. He, too, had trod that rugged path and found that our 
Heavenly Father always keeps His promise. He spoke from experience of many years. He 
promised George and Isabel, "You'll be able to pay your debts, (George was buying land), meet 
your obligations as they come, provide a living for your family and build a new home." George 
has testified many times to the fact that as they'd heeded the counsel, our Heavenly Father's 
promises had been fulfilled. 

This was a busy period in Isabel's life. Reed and John were soon born, bringing much 
joy and satisfaction. George and the older children were cooperative and good to help. 
Eventually, the debts were paid; the children grew up and Lynn and Zula filled missions. 



88 



Through united effort and much hard work, early and late, with Isabel giving her fullest 
possible support, a new brick home was completed. It was finished in 1947, about the time Zula 
returned home from her mission. How proud Isabel was of her new home and she certainly had 
every right to be. It as a lovely home and much enjoyed, but for Isabel only a short time - a half 
a dozen short years. She passed away in 1953. 

No matter how busy they were George and Isabel always found time to observe the 
Sabbath day and take care of their church work. Isabel was selected to serve on the 
Genealogical Committee in the Archer Ward, being instrumental in promoting research and 
temple attendance. She was an excellent seamstress and made her own beautiful temple clothes, 
George's and many others. She also assisted others who wanted to make their own. She took 
pride in hers and kept them spotless and well pressed. They were always beautiful and sparkling 
white. She and George attended the temple often. One year she and George accepted the 
challenge to do one hundred endowments. They completed it, too, taking others who had the 
same assignment, but were less fortunate and had no way of going. 

Isabel served faithfully as Improvement Era Director, being responsible for the sale and 
subscriptions of the ERA in our ward. She was doing this work at the time of her passing. I 
have a renewal slip with her signature dated October of 1953. Whatever work she was called to 
do was very well done. She was exact, precise and well organized. 

She enjoyed reading the ERA and RELIEF SOCIETY MAGAZINE. While I served as 
Relief Society President from December 30, 1945, until the time of her death in November of 
1953, as well as previous to this time, she was a most faithful member and worker in that 
organization, accepting any responsibility assigned to her. She gave countless hours of 
compassionate service. She served several years on the Sunshine Committee, sending greetings, 
cards and messages, to those who were ill. She was an excellent quilter and could be depended 
upon to help with the quilting. I have no idea how many quilts we quilted, but she did a "Lion's 
Share" of that and all other work we had to do. I do not know how long she served as a visiting 
teacher, but it was many years. She held that position also at the time of her death. She gave 
freely of her time and talents whenever she was needed. 

Hers was loyal and devoted support to her husband, George, in his church work. He 
served as counselor to Bishop Sterling Magleby during his period of service as Bishop - five 
years. 

Isabel had a strong testimony of the divinity of the Church of Jesus Christ, which she 
bore often in Relief Society and Fast Meeting. This is by no means a complete record of service 
that she rendered in the Church, rather, a mere mention of service that I can recall she rendered, 
even a quarter of a century after her passing. I can honestly say that I don't know of a soul who 
gave more freely of means, time and talents to her family, the Church, and her fellow men. It 
seemed that her service was always needed and she gave the same sweet consideration and 
assistance to the poor and needy as to those living under more favorable circumstances. Many of 
us are respecters of persons and circumstances, but not Isabel. She served without thought of pay 
during the night as well as the daylight hours. I always felt that her family was not neglected, but 
blessed, due to her time outside of the home. Of necessity, she hurried faster and George and the 
children exerted greater effort during her absence. I'd venture to say that through planning and 
united effort there was always plenty of nourishing and tasty food as well as clean clothes to 
wear and clean beds to sleep in. 

She was an ingenious homemaker, making the very best use of everything she had to 
work with. Whether she made cooked cereal, brown bread or white, mashed potatoes and gravy, 
apple or carrot pudding, jam or jelly, mince, apple or lemon pie. it was always very well done 
and most delicious. Guests were invited often and made most welcome. There was always room 



89 



and plenty of food for one more at her table. Prayer was always an important part of George and 
Isabel's life. They had night and morning prayers as a family, as well as individual prayers. They 
prayed sincerely and often. 

George was interested in doing research on his own line. He had tried, without success, 
for some time to close a break in the records not far back, so close, in fact, that it seemed that 
living relatives should have the necessary dates and information. Relatives in his family living 
in Weston and McCammon were thought to be a likely source. Early in November 1953, they 
decided to make another attempt. George as usual, was busy with fall work and anxious to 
complete it while weather was good. It was decided that since Isabel could drive, that she'd take 
her father and George's older sisters Hannah and Alice, and go to the places mentioned. They 
stopped first at McCammon, fairly early in the day. 

Having been unsuccessful in their attempt, they were leaving the home- In bidding 
goodbye, Isabel stepped backwards onto the porch. It was a new home and as yet had no railing. 
This allowed her to fall to the ground. It was only a distance of 1 8 to 24 inches, but sufficient to 
break her hip. Quickly she realized the extent of the damage done and asked them not to move 
her until an ambulance could come and take her to the hospital. She was covered with blankets, 
but it took quite a while for the ambulance to come from Pocatello. Eventually, she was taken 
from McCammon to the LDS Hospital in Idaho Falls. Even after this delay she could not be 
taken care of immediately. Doctor Sell, the bone specialist, was out of town, so she was made 
comfortable and given a sedative to relieve the pain until the doctor came and a pin could be put 
in her hip. The family was notified and George and Maude were at her bedside in a very short 
time. 

I talked to Maude before she left. Being President of the Relief Society and needing to 
attend the funeral for William Squires and help with lunch for the family, it was decided that I 
should go to Idaho Falls later. Maude called saying that Isabel had not regained consciousness 
and wasn't doing very well, and that if she didn't soon arouse and seem better, she'd call back. 
About eleven that night she called saying, "Isabel isn't improving. Why don't you call Brother 
Larsen and have him come and give her a special blessing." She asked me to stop at Isabel's 
home and get her tooth and hair brushes, comb, robe and gown, and additional clothing. I called 
Brother Larsen and it was as though he was expecting the call, he answered so quickly. Keith 
and I called for Bertha, got the items for Isabel, and Brother Larsen and then hurried to Idaho 
Falls. 

As we left the car to go into the hospital, we helped Brother Larsen, who was blind, and 
in doing so I forgot to take the suitcase with Isabel's things. I had arranged to spend the night 
there, so I said, I'll come back and get it as you leave." 

Isabel failed to recognize us, but Brother Larsen, George, and Keith administered to her. 
Brother Larson sealed the anointing and gave her a beautiful blessing. Having administered to 
Isabel, Brother Larsen said, 'We shouldn't stay long, but I can put Isabel's name on the Prayer 
List in the morning when the Stake Presidency and High Council meet, if you'd like it." We 
assured him we'd like to have it done. In the few minutes he was there he said three times, "You 
call me early in the morning and let me know how Isabel is before I go to the meeting, and if you 
want her name on the Prayer List, I'll put it on." Each time we assured him we wanted it done. 
Soon, he, Keith, and Bertha left. Due to the seriousness of Isabel's condition, I didn't go out to 
the car with them. They hadn't gone far when Bertha said, "Oh, Opal forgot to get Isabel's 
things." "It's all right," Brother Larsen said, "She won't need them." Evidence that he knew she 
would not recover. 

At the hospital, Isabel's pulse weakened gradually. Nurses came in often to check her 
pulse and temperature. Each time they recorded it on a sheet, which they left in the window. We 
read it, both Maude and I, and realized that each check recorded a lower figure than the one 



90 



previous. Doctor Sell was called. He came and checked her, then said, "I've done all I can do. If 
you'd like to call another doctor in, feel at liberty to do it, or any other thing you'd like to do; she 
isn't a bit good." We knew full well that only the great physician could do what needed to be 
done to save her life. She failed to respond to the touch of our hands or voice. It was plain to see 
that she was slipping from us. Time passed slowly. All we could do was watch and pray for her 
recovery. Nurses called Doctor Sell again. He came about 4:45 a.m. He examined her, shook his 
head, and asked, "Does she have a family?" We told him she did. He said, "It would be well to 
call them so they could come if they'd like - she hasn't long to be with us. Her heart is very 
weak." We knew it was so. Maude alerted George and the family was called. 

Doctor Sell asked, "How long will it take them to get here?" I told him. "We could give 
her a shot of adrenalin directly in her heart - maybe we can keep her till they come." We asked 
him to do it and she rallied slightly. We were hopeful it would make her stronger, but gradually 
its effect wore off. He asked if he should give her another shot to allow the children time to 
come. He did so. Some of the children (I don't remember exactly which ones) hurried to her 
bedside. 

Even though she'd been stronger after each shot of adrenalin, as the effects of it wore off, 
she weakened. She was fighting a loosing battle and slipping gently away from us. Finally her 
weary heart stopped beating. It was approximately six o'clock a.m., Sunday, November 8, 1953, 
when her earthly mission closed. 

Our Heavenly Father had seen fit to call her home to a well-deserved rest. She'd given 
her very best to her family, loved ones and those in need of help. 

Brother Larsen knew through inspiration from our Heavenly Father, "She'd not need her 
brush, comb or other earthly things any longer." I called to report her passing, but he was not 
surprised; he had been assured that her mission was very near it's close as he administered to her. 

She had served with a heart and spirit never too weary to help another in need. Her span 
of interest and concern for others had been broad. I'm positive that as is said in the 25 l chapter 
of Matthew, our Heavenly Father would say to her, "Come ye blessed of my Father, inherit the 
Kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: For I was an hungered and ye gave 
me meat: I was thirsty and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger and ye took me in: Naked and ye 
clothed me: I was sick and ye visited me: I was in prison and ye came unto me." 

Dennis, Reed and John; step children: Chester, Lynn, Zula and Glenna and seventeen 
grandchildren. 

Written by Opal Clements Weekes 




Back:Dennis, Lynn, Chester. Zula, Glenna 
Front: Reid, George, Isabel, John 



91 



Family Group Record 

















Page 1 of 2 




Husband )SS 






Bom 13 Apr 1922 


Place Sunnydell. Madison. Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


31 Mav 1930 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


27 Aug 1957 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


6 Feb 1929 


LOGAN 




Married 5 Jul 1945 


Place Rexburq, Madison. Idaho 


SeaISp 


27 Aug 1957 I IFALL 




Husband's father Joseph GIORDANO 






Husband's mother Susan Isabel WEEKES 




Wife 






Bom 14 Apr 1928 


poce Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


31 Oct 1936 
27Auq1957 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


27Aua1957 


IFALL 




wife's father Theodore RICKS 




Wires mother Beulah BUNNELL 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


1 


M 


John Wavne WEEKES 






Bom 21 Jun 1946 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


30 Jul 1955 
30 Nov 1989 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


u BOISE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Aug 1957 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 






Spouse Janice Marie BANTA 






Married 22 Dec 1967 Place Archer. Madison. Idaho jseaisp 


30 Nov 1989 I BOISE 


2 


M 


Blaine Theodore WEEKES 






Bom 24 Apr 1948 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2Auq1956 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


1985 


BOISE 




Died Jun 1981 


Place Emmett, Gem, Idaho 


SealPar 


27 Auq 1957 


IFALL 




Buried Jun 1981 


Place Bramwell Cemetery, Letha, Gem, Idaho 






spouse Sharon Marie BROWN 




Married 12 Jul 1968 > (D) I Place Letha. Gem. Idaho fsealSp 


i 


3 


M 


Norman Ross WEEKES 






Bom 14 Jul 1949 


place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Auq 1957 ] 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


May 1982 IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Auq 1957 I IFALL 




Buried 


Place 






spouse Karen Jean CAMPBELL 




Married 9 Apr 1971 1 Place Letha. Gem. Idaho 1 SeaISp 


Mav 1982 I IFALL 


4 


F 


EvaLvn WEEKES 






Bom 21 Jul 1951 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Feb 1960 1 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 








Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Aug 1957 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse Clarence Carol "Rockv" CARPENTER 




Married 17 Jun 1970 I Place Elko. Nevada (SeaISp 


5 


F 


Elaine WEEKES 






Bom 11 Sep 1953 


Place Boise, Ada, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jun 1962^ 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


20 Apr 1996 BOISE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Aug 1957 IFALL 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Donald Eugene WO' 




Married 8 Jan 1973 


Place Letha. Gem. Idaho | seatsp 


6 


M 


James Owen WEEK 


ES 






Bom 4 Jan 1955 


Place Boise, Ada, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Aug 1963 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Oct 1998 


^BOISE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Aug 1957 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse Charlene Emma BRAITHWATE 




Married 13 Jan 1977 I Place Emmett. Gem. Idaho Iseaisp 


10 Jun 2000 I BOISE 




Prepared by Carl NvkamD 


Address 14054 N 65 E 




Phor 
E-rru 


* 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 




hi address cari@srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 




Date 


prepared 1 1 Apr 2006 


83401 USA 



92 







Family Group Record 






Page 2 of 2 


! Husband RoSS WEEKES 


wife Beulah Elizabeth RICKS 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M Carl Joseph WEEKES 




Bom 21 Jul 1956 


Place Boise. Ada, Idaho 


Baptized 


5Sep_1964 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27Auq1957 


IFALL 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse Judy Marie WATSON 


Married 1974 (D) I Ptace Boise. Ada, Idaho 


SeaISp 


I 


spouse Kathi SHERMAN 


Married 28 Jun 1997 i Place Stanley. Custer, Idaho 


SeaISp 




F 


Melody Nadine WEEKES 




Bom 25 May 1958 j Place Boise. Ada. Idaho 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 4 Jan 1961 


Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


SealPar 


BICi 


Buried 7 Jan 1961 


place Sutton Cemetery Archer. Madison. Idaho 






Spouse 


Married I Place 


SeaISp 


I 


M 


Lewis Walter WEEKES 




Bom 20 May 1960 


piace Boise, Ada, Idaho 


Baptized 


25 May 1968 




LChr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse Carla Louise HELZER 


Married 27 Mar 1981 (D) I Place Emmett. Gem, Idaho 


SeaISp 


I 


spouse Cynthia Corianna HOWARD 






Mamed 27 May 1995 I Place Caldwell. Canyon. Idaho 


SeaISp 




M 1 




Bom 8 May 1962 


Place Boise, Ada, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jun 1970 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Jan 1982 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Darci Roxanne JOSEPH 


Married 27SeDl986 Place Forks. Clallam. Washinqton 


SeaISp 




M 


Mark Edwin WEEKES 




Bom 15 Oct 1964 


Place Emmett, Gem, Idaho 


Baptized 


30 Jun 1973 i 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Apr 1988! BOISE 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse Sandra Lynn Ann IRBY 






Married 14 Dec 1984 I Place Letha. Gem. Idaho 


SeaISp 


Aor1988[ BOISE 


M 


Calvin, Blake WEEKES 




Bom 19 Dec 1970 


Place Emmett, Gem, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jan 1979 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse Sara Elizabeth DAVIS 






Mamed 1 8 May 2002 I Place Emmett, Gem. Idaho 


SeaISp 





93 




The Ross And Beth Weekes Family 

Back: Norman, Carl, Blaine, Owen, Wayne, Lewis 

Middle: Brian, Mark Front: Elaine, Beth, Ross, Eva, Blake 



T.m* *•-' * 




I 



Back: Norman, Mark, Owen, Brian Blake, Carl, Lewis, Wayne 
Front: Elaine, Beth, Eva Lyn Forefront: Ross 






94 




95 



ROSS & BETH WEEKES FAMILY 

Ross was born on April 13, 1922, in the home of John and Ida Weekes, his grandparents, 
in Archer, Idaho. During his childhood and youth he was raised by his grandparents along with 
his aunts and uncles. He loved working on the farm, especially with his horse teams, and riding 
whenever he had the opportunity. This love of horses and ranching would stay with Ross his 
entire life. His life was, of course, interrupted by the depression of the 30's, creating hardships 
not only for him, but also for his family. Ross also enjoyed many other activities during his time 
at school, playing football and baseball. With the outbreak of World War II, Ross joined the 
Army and became a lead motorcycle driver. It was also during this time that he became a two 
time national Golden Glove boxing champion. However, during night maneuvers on a 
particularly stormy night, he was again driving lead during a convoy. As it was a black out 
period, which meant there could be no lights on, he could not see where the road turned and had 
an accident which left him with a broken back. Consequently, he was released to go home and 
heal. 

Beth was born on April 14, 1928, into the home of Theodore and Beulah Ricks in 
Rexburg, Idaho. Beth was welcomed by her family and had a very enjoyable early childhood. 
She recalls that her dad was doing very well in the sheep business until the depression hit and a 
disease destroyed nearly all of his sheep. Beth tells many stories of working long hours in the 
beet fields during that time to help the family make ends meet. She was an excellent student, 
excelling not only in academics, but also in athletics. She was a mean midman in both field 
hockey and ice hockey, passing many of her athletic abilities to her children and grandchildren. 
When she was 16 she got a job as a waitress at a nearby cafe. 

It was at this time that Ross, fresh back from his years as a rodeo rider, stunt man, and 
soldier, he came into the cafe and met Beth. Whether it was love at first sight or not is unsure, 
but a friendship developed that then led to their marriage on July 5, 1945. The first few years for 
this feisty red-headed damsel and the dashing traveling cowboy were filled with joy and the 
beginning of their family. They welcomed their first four children; Wayne, Blaine, Norman, and 
Eva Lyn at their farm in Rexburg. They then moved their family to Meridian, Idaho to work with 
the 7- L ranches and Obie Beck. While in Meridian Ross was instrumental in helping to purify 
the Shorthorn cattle breed. It was also during this time that their family increased with the 
addition of Elaine, Owen, and Carl. After a few years the family moved to Mayfield, Idaho, 
where they were buying a ranch while continuing to run with the 7- L system. There were many 
more years of happiness and hard work while on the ranch. Life for the children was exciting as 
they ran the hills, rode horses, worked the cattle, and lived under the big blue sky. Their 
education was even exciting as they went to a one-room school house until the 8th grade. Then 
they got to go to the big city of Mountain Home to attend high school. The kids were all busy in 
sports, academics, and of course working on the ranch or taking care of the younger kids, 
Melody, Lewis, and Brian.. 

In 1963 Ross and Beth moved from their ranch to Emmett, Idaho and started to farm, 
milk cows, and truck. As the older kids moved away and married some of them returned to the 
family business of trucking and soon many were involved in raising cattle and helping with the 
trucks. It was during this time that the last two members of their family were added, Mark and 
Blake. As time progressed their trucking business grew and shrank according to how many of the 
boys were helping or driving at any given time. However, one by one most of them moved on to 
other careers until eventually the business was left in the capable hands of the oldest son Wayne, 



96 



with the third son, Norman, taking care of the cattle. Ross retired, but is now left paralyzed from 
a severe stroke and is cared for by Beth and the children that are still living around them. While 
they all have very busy lives, they seem to find the opportunity to be together and continue to 
build the family bonds that Ross and Beth started some 60 years ago. 

Wayne lives in Emmett and now runs the trucks, along with his own cattle and farm with 
the help of his son Ronnie. His wife Janice works at the Emmett School district and they enjoy 
their six grandkids, three each from their daughter Dani and son Ronnie. 

Blaine passed away, in a motorcycle accident. He left his wife Sharon, daughters Shelly 
and Angela. Shelly now has three children and Angela has two. 

Norman and Karen also live in Emmett, they now run the cattle while he works at Boise 
Valley Feeders and she works in electronics in Boise. They have four children Ross, Tom, Troy, 
and Christina and sixteen grandchildren. 

Eva Lyn married Rocky Carpenter and they live in Eagle, where he is now retired while 
Eva continues to work and enjoy her horses. 

Elaine married Don Woods, they live in Wilder, where Don farms and Elaine teaches 
school. They have six children Travis, Stacey, Ranea, Jason, Clint, and Cody, and the 
grandchildren. 

Owen lives in Boise, where he and his wife Charlene, are close to his work as a John 
Deere salesman. Char enjoys staying home and playing with the grandchildren whenever 
possible. Their two daughters Becky and Jenn have two kids each to contribute to the fold. 

Carl married Kathy and they now live in Caldwell close to their four children, Randy, 
Julie, Kenny John, and Kenny James, and their three grandchildren. Carl works as a shop 
foreman for Western Tricorp truck shop while Kathy runs a day care. 

Melody passed away when she was almost three years old. She was a very bright and 
intelligent little girl, who took great pleasure in caring for baby Lewis and eating tuna fish 
sandwiches with hot chocolate. 

Lewis and Cynthia live in Middleton where they both work for Boise Valley Feeders. 
Lewis is over the trucks, while she is the accountant. They have four children Lonnie, Josh, 
Kimberly, and Jimmy who passed away. They also have two little granddaughters. 

Brian lives in Forks, Washington, the only one living more than an hour away from 
home. His wife Darci is a stay home mom while he goes to teach school each day. They have 
four children Keith, Sean, Patrick, and Erin. 

Mark lives in Letha, and his wife Sandy is also a stay home mom. He teaches school and 
continues to coach. They now have 6 children Mark, Sabrina, Isaac, Jamie, Alex, and Jordan. 

Blake, the baby, finally married Sara and they both work and live in Boise. He works at 
Bobcat West, while Sara works for Washington Mutual as a Loan Officer. 




Ross Weekes 




97 









Family Group Record- 2068 






Page 1 of 2 


Husband Dennis W NELSON-4500 










Bom 19 Jan 1930 J Place ArcherJMadison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. I Place 


Baptized 


5 Feb 1938 






Died ! Place 


Endowed 
SealPar 


18 Nov 1948 
BIC 


IFALL 




Buried I Place 




1 


Married 18 Nov 1948 I Place Idaho, Falls. IdahoFalls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


18 Nov 1948 


IFALL 


j 


Husbands father George Francis NELSON-1 296 






MRIN: 458 






Husbands mother Susan Isabel WEEKES-1 155 










Wife Rjta JOHNSON-4504 






Bom 5Jun1930 


Place Burton, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


4 Jun 1938 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


18 Nov 1948 


IFALL 




Buried l Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's father James Oliver JOHNSON-3276 






MRIN 10 




wHes mother Emma Katherine GREEN-7307 


1 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M Lyle J. Nelson NELSON-7069 










Bom 13 Sep 1949 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Oct 1957 








Chr. | Place 


Endowed 


12 Nov 1968 


IFALL 




Died 
Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Place 






i 




spouse Gale Ann LANCASTER-7070 






MRIN: 3573 




Married 11 Feb 1972 ! Place Oklahoma Citv. Oklahoma. Oklahoma 


SeaISp 


16 Feb 1973 


SWISS 


2 


M 


Steven J. NELSON-7071 




Bom 15 Jan 1951 j Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 Jan 1959 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




i 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




I 


Buried ! Place 




Spouse Kathv VINING-7072 






MRIN: 3574 






Married 14 Alia 1971 (D) I Place Seattle. Kina, Washinaton 


SeaISp 






3 


F 


Carol NELSON-7073 






Bom 10 Jul 1952 {Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6Auq1960 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


14 Sep 1973 


SLAKE 




Died j Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried j Place 










Spouse Alan Hath NEILSEN-7074 






MRIN. 3575 

[ slake! 




Married 14 Sep 1973 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


14 SeD 1973 


4 


M 


Garth Nelson -7076 






Bom 19 Mar 1954 Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5MayJ962 








Chr. i Place 


Endowed 


14 Sep 1973 


SLAKE 




Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


L_ 




Buried I Place 












spouse Kathleen PHILLIPS-7077 






MRIN: 3576 






Married 24 Jun 1976 j Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


24 Jun 1976 


r IFALL n 


5 


F 


Denise NELSON-7078 






Bom 30 Aug 1955 | Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


31Auq1963 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


25 Jun 1975 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 












spouse David George STODDARD-7079 






MRIN: 3577 






Married 25 Jun 1975 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


25 Jun 1975 


IFALL 


6 


M 


Weston NELSON-7080 




i 


Bom 27 Mar 1957 j Place Rexburq, Madison, idaho 


Baptized 


27 Mar 1965 






Chr. Place 


Endowed 


20 Oct 1979 


IFALL 




Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried i Place 










spouse Peggy Ann JENSEN-7081 






MRIN: 3578 




Married" 20 Oct 1978 I Place Piano. Madison Idaho 


SeaISp 


20 Oct 1979 


IFALL 



98 



Family Group Record- 2068 



Page 2 of 2 



j Husband Dennis W NELSON-4500 


Wife Rita JOHNSON-4504 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


1 
LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M Peggy Sue NELSON-7082 




Bom 18 Nov 1958 


piace Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1966 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


28 Ap/ 1978] 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICJ 






Buried J Place 










spouse Brian NICHLOS-7308 






MRIN: 1467 




Mamed 28 Apr 1978 (D) I Place Idaho Falls, Bonnebille. Idaho 


SeaISp 


28 Apr 1978! 


IFALL 




spouse Russell PYLE-7083 






MRIN: 3579 




Mamed 3 Sep 1983 ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 1 Seais P 


i 




F ! Lisa Gay NELSON-7084 




Bom 3 Sep 1960 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


21 Sep 1968i 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


26Jun198lJ 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Jerry Dale CORBETT-7085 






MRIN: 3580 




Mamed 26 Jun 1981 i Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


26 Jun 1981"! 


IFALL i 


F 


Gina Renee NELSON-7086 




Bom 23 Mar 1963 I Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


27Mar197U 




Chr. j Place 


Endowed 


30 May 1998 < 


IFALL 


Died j Place 


SealPar 


BICi 




Buried Place 




spouse Florian Fred SANCHEZ-7087 






MRIN: 3581 




Married 2 Dec 1990 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


I 

. ... i 


i 



4 Mar 2006 



99 







Dennis and Rita Nelson Family 
Standing: Garth, Lyle, Weston. Denise, Steven, Carol 
Rita holding Lisa. Dennis holding Peggy 




100 



Dennis and Rita Nelson Family 
Back: Gina, Lisa, Steven, Garth, Carol,Denise 
Front: Weston, Peggy, Dennis, Rita, Lyle 



DENNIS W. & RITA JOHNSON NELSON FAMILY 

Dennis W. Nelson, born January 1, 1930 to George Francis Nelson and Isabel Weekes in 
the old log family home in Archer, Idaho. He was welcomed by 2 brothers, Chester and Lynn, 
and 2 sisters, Zula and Glenna, later joined by 2 more brothers, Reid and John. They worked and 
played together, enjoyed visits from cousins and neighbors. 

As they grew older all were expected to share in the chores. Some of Dennis' 
responsibilities were feeding pigs and calves. Later on other chores were added such as weeding 
beets and potatoes, then on to pitching hay and grain shocks, milking cows (by hand), and using 
a team of horses to rake hay, etc. He looked forward to haying time when he could run the 
derrick horse. As he got older he was given jobs that required more strength and responsibility. 

He attended Archer Grade School and graduated from Madison High in 1948. He was a 
member of the FFA and the basketball and football teams. As Dennis was growing up he looked 
forward to their trips to the hills to picnic and pick huckleberries and chokecherries. His mother 
nearly always cooked a Dutch over dinner of fried chicken, potatoes and sourdough biscuits. 

Another memory he has is of going to the hills with teams and sleighs for firewood with 
his dad, Uncle Ike and his brothers. 

During his teen years, he was active in Priesthood and Scouting, and loved to participate 
in sports of all kinds. He has always had an eye for a pretty girl and was well-liked and sought 
out as a dance partner. He had the opportunity to dance in the All-Church Dance Festival in Salt 
Lake in 1947. 

While in High School he was introduced to Rita Johnson. They dated as often as funds 
and transportation were available, mostly to church and school dances and an occasional movie 
and the basketball games. 

They were married November 18, 1948 in the Idaho Falls Temple with parents and loved 
ones surrounding them. It was a very special day. It was a double wedding since Dennis' cousin, 
Lee Weekes married Rita's cousin, Delsa Green, that day also. 

As we left the temple it was beginning to snow, the first snow of the year, and it 
continued to snow and is remembered as the famous winter of 1948-49. 

Our first home was one room in the old Jeppson home, which belonged to Chester. It had 
3 outside walls with no insulation. We endured some cold nights, we could leave a teakettle 
boiling on the back of the cook stove and by morning it would be frozen solid. Our furniture was 
purchased at the second-hand store, a wash stand was made out of wooden orange crates (we still 
have it) we carried water from the neighbors across the street until spring came. 

As our family grew we expanded into 2 and then 3 more rooms where we lived for 9 
years, by then we had 6 of our 9 children, the youngest being about 1 month old when we moved 
into our present home. What a treat to have a tub and bathroom in the house, an electric stove 
and a kitchen sink. Sheets were used for curtains and doors until we were able to get real ones. 
Floor coverings and painted walls came quite some time later. Our comfortable home is quite 
different now from the early days. 

Lyle J. was born September 9, 1 949. He attended LDS Business College in SLC for a 
year and then served a mission to Northern States. Upon his return he volunteered for the draft 
and received his basic training in Fort Ord, California. Then transferred to Ft. Sill. Okla. He met 
and married Gale Ann Lancaster. He was sent to Germany; Gale joined him there for the next 
four years. Amy, Illine and James Joshua were born in Germany. They returned to Fort Sill and 
Lyle Jacob and Abby Ann joined the family there. They are presently living in Blanchard, Okla. 



101 



Lyle served as the first Branch President of Blanchard and served in that capacity for about 12 
years, he is presently branch clerk and works at Dayton Tire Co. He is the proud Grandpa to 7 
grandchildren and they are awaiting twins in December. 

Steven J. was born January 15, 1951. He attended Ricks College and later joined the 
National Guard taking his basic training in Ft. Leonardwood, Mo. He is presently employed at 
Intermountain Gas Co., as marketing manager. He married Kathy Vining, they have a son, 
Damon Chase. They later divorced. He lives in Rexburg, ID. 

Carol was born July 10, 1952. She graduated from LDS Business College. She worked 
for the State of Utah and later on married Alan Hatch Neilson. They live in West Valley City, 
UT. They have 7 children: Candice, Michael Alan & Matthew Dennis (twins), Erica, Kelli 
Katherine, Kristi Lyn and Allisa. Carol works at the Church Distribution Center in SLC, she has 
served in all church auxiliaries, from nursery to the Presidencies. She is the doting grandmother 
of 1 1 beautiful grandbabies, 4 boys and 7 girls, with another expected in June. 

Garth J. was born March 19, 1954. He went to Idaho State, studying auto mechanics for 
about 1 year, then was called to serve a mission in the Great Australia West Mission. Upon his 
return he was set up on a blind date by Weston, with Kathleen Phillips from Aberdeen, ID. She 
was in the Nursing Program at Ricks College. They were married and have 4 children: Samuel 
Garth, Rita Simone, Jason Oliver, and Meagan Sue. Garth is the manager of Stores and 
Receiving at BYU-Idaho. He lives next door to us and is presently serving on the High Council 
and is Stake YM President of Rexburg South Stake 

Denise was born 8-30-55. She married David George Stoddard and then received her RN 
from the Nursing Program at Ricks College. She worked as a nurse at hospitals in American 
Fork, UT, Provo, UT, Monticello, UT. and is presently at Cottonwood Hospital in Murray, UT. 
They have 2 sons: David Geo. Jr. and Steven Thomas. She lives in West Jordan, UT. is married 
to an educator and has been a Bishop's wife and is presently the wife of a counselor in the Stake 
Presidency. Denise is an on-call nurse for her neighborhood and her siblings and their kids. 

Weston J. was born March 27, 1957. He loved following his older brothers. He 
especially liked going to Kilgore to haul hay and check on the cows, he even offered to only 
drink water if they would let him go with them. While hauling hay from Kilgore one summer he 
noticed a neighbor girl rolling hay bales and started inquiring about her. He found that her name 
was Peggy Ann Jensen. A few years later he got up enough courage to ask her Mom if he could 
ask her for a date. They were married and have 3 children: Ashley Ann, Tyrel James, and 
Michaela Lyn. He lives in Piano, ID. and has served for several years in the Scouting program, in 
the Elder's Quorum Presidency, YM President and is presently 2nd Counselor in the Bishopric. 
He is employed by the US. Post Office in Idaho Falls, ID. 

Peggy Sue was born November 18, 1958 on our 10th wedding anniversary. She went to 
Ricks College for a year, enjoyed being on the Drill team in both High School and College. She 
went to Salt Lake City to work. She loved sports, and while she was keeping score for a city 
baseball team, she met a nice looking young man, Russell Pyle. They were married and have 2 
lovely daughters: Roxanne Denise and Madison Marryn. They own a wheel alignment shop; 
Peggy is the office manager/secretary/receptionist/parts acquirer and all-around go-fer girl. They 
live in Draper, UT. Peggy works in Young Women's and in the Library. 

Lisa Gay was born September 9, 1960, attended Ricks College and also worked there part 
time, she later worked full-time after her graduation, in the High School Relations Dept. She also 
met her husband, Jerry Corbett, on a blind date. They were married and she continued to work at 
Ricks while Jerry finished his schooling. Their first child, Trevor D. was born in Rexburg and 



102 



then, they moved to Logan, UT. where Bradley N. was born. They moved to West Jordan, UT. 
and 2 more children blessed their home: Kyle D. and Mallory. Lisa is presently doing medical 
transcriptions and is able to work from her home. She is also the YW President and has spent 
several years in the Cub Scouting program. 

Gina Renee was born March 27, 1963. She graduated from Ricks College and continued 
her education at Utah State in Logan, UT. The day after her graduation she left for Washington, 
DC where she worked for the American Home Economics for a little over a year. She missed her 
family and so she decided to return to the West. She lived with Peggy until she found work. She 
was hired by Dyno-Nobel as an accountant and has been there since. She met and married Fred 
Sanchez and they have a son, Jeffrey Scott. They later divorced. Gina and Jeff live in Murray, 
UT. She has been involved in Young Women's and is presently serving as President and loves 
every minute of it. 

All of our children attended Archer Grade School and graduated from Madison High. 

Dennis began work sorting potatoes for $1.00 hr. He worked at the Utah-Idaho Sugar 
factory for several campaigns, then a year at the Kraft Cheese factory and finally for the State of 
Idaho Transportation Dept. retiring in Jan. 1994 after 27 years. All this time trying to keep a few 
cows and hoping for a good crop year at Kilgore. 

Presently he works on Tuesdays at the Rexburg Livestock Auction, which he enjoys very 
much. He has rented out the Kilgore land but still has a few cows and calves to pamper. 

He has been a faithful Home teacher for over 60 years among other positions that he has 
held. We are proud of our family. We have 10 returned missionaries, 17 Eagle Scouts, 28 
grandchildren, and 1 1 great-grandchildren with 4 more expected before the end of the year. 



103 









Family Group Record 






Pagel of 2 


Husband Reid W NELSON 






Bom 23Jun1934 


Place Archer, Madison, IdahOj USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1942 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


23 Jul 1952 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Married 23 Jul 1952 (D) 


Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


23 Jul 1952 


IFALL 






other spouse Diane TUCKER 




Mamed 13 Sep 1980 ! Place Pocatello. Bannock. Idaho |SealSp 




Husbands father Georqe Francis NELSON 






Husoantfs mother Susan Isabel WEEKES 




wife Darlene KLIlv 3LER 






Bom 21 Oct 1932 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


2 Nov 1940 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


23 Jul 1952 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's father Alma KLINGLER 




wife's mother Henrietta PARLEY 




Children List each child in order of birth. lds ordinance dates Temple 


1 


M | Blair Reid NELSON 






Bom 23Auq1953 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Sep 1961 






Chr. i Place 


Endowed 


29 Jul 1972 


IFALL 






Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse Elizabeth WOODLAND 






Married 20 Auq 1976 ! Place Looan. Cache. Utah Iseaisp 


20Auq1976l LOGAN 


2 




M 


David K. NELSON 






Bom 25 Sep 1954 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Nov 19621 IFALL 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


2JuM974 


IFALL 




D.ed 22 Dec 1991 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buned 24 Dec 1991 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 




spouse Cindv Lee TUCKER 






Married 25Jun1977 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho Iseaisp 


25Jun1977! IFALL 


3 


M 


Dale K. NELSON 






Bom 3 Apr 1956 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 May 1964 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


31 May 1975 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






spouse Partrica Suzanne MALATIN 


Mamed 14 Feb 1987 '(b) ! Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho Iseaisp 


14 Feb 1987 I IFALL I 


4 


F 


Karen Kaye NELSON 






Bom 1 Apr 1958 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Apr 1966 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9 Sep 1977 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buned 


Place 






Spouse Brent Bennett RHEES 




Mamed 9 Sep 1977 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho I seaisp 


9 Sep 1977 I IFALL 


5 


F | ELS< 






Bom 4AUQ1959 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5Auq1967 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


24Auq1985 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse Shawn Joseph SOMMER 




Mamed 16 Dec 1988 i Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho I seaisp 


16 Dec 1988 I IFALL 


6 


F 


Tamra NELSON 






Bom 11 Jul 1961 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1969 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


14 Oct 1983 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse Glenn ANDERSEN 






Mamed 1 Auq 1986 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho Iseaisp 


1Auo1986i IFALL 




Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N. 65 E. 




Phone 208-523-73J8 


Idaho Falls, Idaho 


83401 




E-maii address carl@srv.myrf.net 






Date prepared 3 Apr 2006 


United States Of America 



104 









Family Group Record 


Page 2 of 2 




Husband Reid W NELSON 




wife Elma Darlene KLINGLER 




■ 

Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


7 


F 


Meiani NELSON 






Bom 7 Mar 1970 Place Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


Baptized 25 Mar 1978 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 27 Nov 1990 I FALL 






JJied 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Brett Dean JACOBSON 






Mamed 27 Dec 1990 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


seaisp 27 Dec 1990! IFALL 


8 


M ! 1 ELS< 






Bom 29 Mar 1973 


Place Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


Baptized 2Mav198l! 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 28 May 1992 IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar BIC | 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Bethany Sue HILL 








Married 19 Aug 1995 i Place St. Georqe, Washinqton, Utah 


seaisp 19 Aua 1995 i SGEOR 



105 




Reid Nelson Family 1986 
Back: Brian, Brent, Melani, Darlene, Kevin, Reid, Diane,Blair 
Elizabeth, Alan, David, Front: Karen, Kristen, Randy, Phillip, 
Tami, Glenn, Ranae, Katrina, Rebecca,Cindy, Floor : Julie, 
Ben, Ben, Dan, Chris 




Reid Nelson Family 
Back: Dale, Blair, David Front: Melani, Darlene, Karen, Reid, 
Shirleen 



106 




00 

ON 

OS 



e 
o 

13 

Z 

'S 



107 



REID W. NELSON FAMILY 

Reid W. Nelson, the second son of George and Isabel Weekes Nelson, was born in 1934 
at Archer, Idaho. He grew up on the farm, learning all the tricks of the trade included in dairy 
and beef cattle activities. He enjoyed athletics, swimming, skiing, camping, and hunting. He 
excelled in basketball. He married Darlene Klingler in the Idaho Falls Temple in 1952. While 
living in Rexburg, Reid worked for Midland Elevators and then the city water department. Then 
moving to Piano, he worked on a dairy farm. Returning to Rexburg, he sold insurance and 
encyclopedias. The family moved to Rigby, back to Rexburg, then to Pocatello, residing first in 
the Alameda area then purchasing a home located south of Pocatello off Mink Creek Road 
bordering on the Caribou National Forest. There the family enjoyed country living such as 
raising a garden, caring for a couple of horses, and even milking a cow for a few years. At that 
time Reid worked for Garrett Truck Lines as a cross-country driver. The family includes eight 
children: Blair (1953), David (1954), Dale (1956), Karen (1958), Shirleen (1959), Tamra (1961), 
all of whom were born in Rexburg, and Melani (1970), and Kevin (1973), born in Pocatello. 
Some favorite family pastimes included gathering with extended family, snowmobiling, off road 
motorcycling, weekends spent camping in their camper, boating, fishing, and water-skiing. 
Yellowstone was a popular destination. The family remained active members of the church in 
their Pocatello ward with six of their children serving full-time missions. All of their children 
attended Ricks College before moving on to other universities. Immediately following the 1976 
Teton Flood, Reid began working in the clean up effort doing contract work with a backhoe and 
dump truck. From that experience he started his own excavation business putting in sewer and 
water pipes for new housing developments. Reid and Darlene were divorced in 1 980, and Reid 
married Diane Tucker. Darlene moved back to Rexburg and worked in food services at Ricks 
College until her retirement. She served a church service mission in Nauvoo during 2000 and 
2001. Reid and Diane moved to Vancouver, Washington. There Reid operated his own trucking 
business, hiring a couple of drivers and driving one of the trucks himself until his retirement. 

He purchased a boat so he could enjoy his chief hobby, salmon fishing on the ocean. He 
has enjoyed sharing this hobby with many friends and family through the years. Following his 
retirement, he and Diane purchased a winter home in Desert Hot Springs, California where they 
enjoy spending the cooler months of the year. In 2004 they sold their home in Vancouver and 
moved into a new home in Idaho Falls. Though now retired, Reid keeps busy driving truck on 
occasion, working around his home, and visiting with family and friends. 

Blair, following his mission to Norway, married Elizabeth (1976), and they are the 
parents of six children: Christopher, Katrina, Daniel, Benjamin, Alan and Anne. Blair completed 
his MBA at BYU, took a job with Hewlett Packard in Boise, Idaho and then completed his 
Master of Computer Science degree. He programs manufacturing software for printers. Their 
four oldest children are now married, and Blair and Elizabeth are the proud grandparents of five 
grandchildren, four girls and one boy. 

David married Cindy (1977) after his return from a mission to Switzerland. They are the 
parents of seven children: Randall, Philip, Renae, Rebecca, Lisa, Robert, and Rachael. David 
graduated from the University of Utah in physical therapy and worked in Idaho Falls, Nampa, 
Pocatello, and Rexburg. Not long after the birth of their youngest child, David passed away 
(1991) from cancer. Cindy completed her college degree at ISU and is teaching mathematics at 
Madison Junior High School. Her three oldest children are now married, and she has four 



108 



grandsons and one granddaughter. She married Austin Muir in 2004. 

Dale completed his mission in Louisiana and after graduating from BYU with a degree 
in computer aided design, began working in San Diego. While there, he met and married Patty 
(1987). They are the parents of four boys: Jared, Jacob, Shane and Nathan. Dale returned to BYU 
and completed his Masters degree. They lived in Vancouver, Washington and are now in West 
Jordan, Utah where Dale taught classes for ITT Tech for many years, and Patty is a preschool 
teacher and daycare provider. 

Karen married Brent Rhees (1977) and they moved to Logan while he completed his civil 
engineering degree at USU. After living a short time in Colorado and Salt Lake City, they settled 
in Bountiful. They have four children: Kristen, Julie, Brian, and Michelle. The two oldest girls 
are married, and Karen and Brent are grandparents of five. Karen substitute teaches at the local 
schools and keeps busy with craft projects. 

Shirleen served a mission in Paraguay, graduated with an elementary education degree 
from BYU and married Shawn Sommer (1988). Shawn works for FedEx and in the customer 
service department at Questar Gas. They live in West Jordan, Utah and are the parents of four: 
Bryce, Blake, Brett, and Michelle. Shirleen readily shares her art talents with those around her. 

Tami served her mission in Australia and after returning, met and married Glenn 
Andersen (1986). They have lived since then in the Springfield area, near Aberdeen, Idaho where 
Tami enjoys her family and her horses. Glenn works as a Deputy Sheriff for Bingham County, 
and Tami drives school bus. They are the parents of six children, three boys and three girls: 
Ryan, Analisa, Tashina, Jason, Terance, and Marissa. 

Melani married Brett Jacobson (1990) and completed her elementary education degree at 
ISU where Brett had continued his education. They moved to Omaha, Nebraska where Brett 
graduated from Creighton University in dentistry. They lived and worked in Pocatello for several 
years, and now Brett has a dental practice in Idaho Falls where they recently built a new home. 
They are the parents of five children, three boys and two girls: Tyler, Brandon, Matthew, Calissa, 
and Katriece. 

Kevin married Bethany (1995) after returning from his mission to South Carolina. He 
graduated with a mechanical engineering degree from BYU. They moved back to Southeast 
Idaho where Kevin got a job working at the INL. They are the parents of four children, three 
girls and one boy: Kendra, Allysa, Bridget, and Ethan. They recently sold their home in Idaho 
Falls and are having a new home built in the Rigby area. 



109 



Family Group Record- 2071 



Pagel of 2 





Husband John W NELSON-4502 






Bom 25 Dec 1935 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


31 Dec 1943 






Died 25 Mar 1983 
Buned 29 Mar 1983 


Place Idaho, Falls, IdahoFalls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 
SealPar 


29 Jun 1955 
BIC 


. IFALL_. 






Married 29Jun1955 Place Idaho, Falls, IdahoFalls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


29 Jun 1955 


IFALL 




Husbands father Georqe Francis NELSON-1296 




MRIN: 458 




i Husbands mother Susan Isabel WEEKES-1 1 55 






Wife Nikki Lou ORMOND-4506 








Bom 12Apj1936 


Place Ririe, Jefferson, Idaho 


LDS ordii 


lance dates 

6 MayJ944T 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 




I 


Died 


Place 


Endowed 


29 Jun 1955 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC] 


i 


WHe-s father Willard Clyde ORMOND-7091 




MRIN: 2074 


1 




wrfes mother Lucille ANDERSON-7092 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M I John Nelson -7093 








Bom 24 Mar 1956 


piace Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


29 Mar 19641 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Abt1975 IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICT 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse Lynette BROWN-7 1 1 




MRIN: 3582 


2 




Married 16 Dec 1977 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


16 Dec 19771 IFALL 


F IJulieNELSON-7094 




i 




Bom 10 Mar 1958 Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Apr 19661 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


27 Apr 1977 | IFALL 1 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BlCf 






Buried 


Place 




spouse James Robert THOMPSON- 7309 




MRIN: 3693 






Married 16 Jan 1976 .Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


27 Apr 1977 j IFALL 


3 


M 


Michael Clyde NELSON-7095 






Bom 29Jun1959 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Jul 1967 








Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


Nov 1983 


MANTI 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






i 


Spouse Jamie Gail VAN EPPS-7096 




MRIN: 3583 




Married 14 Feb 1987 (D) [p»ace Reno, Storev. Nevada 


SeaISp 


1 " ~ 




spouse Natalie BURNS-7097 




MRIN: 3584 






Married Nov 1984 I Place Manti. Sanoete. Utah |SealSp 


Nov 1984T MANTI 


4 


F 


Evelyn Kay NELSON 


-7098 






Bom 21 Sep 1960 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


21 Sep 1968 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


5 Auq 2004 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC] 




Buried 


Place 








iSpouse Mark S. PETERSEN-7099 




MRIN 3585 




Married 20 Jan 1984 (D) I Place Rexburq, Madison. Idaho 


SeaISp 


I 

I 




L spouse Wylie GOWEN-7 1 00 




MRIN: 3586 




Married 5 Auq 2004 (D) I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


5 Auq 2004 I IFALL 


5 


F 


Brenda Lucille NELSON-7101 






Bom 2 Jun 1962 ! Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jun 1970 






Chr. Place 


Endowed 


25 Sep 1992 


IFALL j 




Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried Place 








spouse Darrell Kay WHELLER-7102 




MRIN: 3587 




Married 11Nov1989 i Place Elko, Nevada 


SeaISp 


26 Sep 19921 IFALL 


6 


M 


Kerry George NELSON-7103 






Bom 2 Jan 1964 


Place Rexburq, Madison. Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1972 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Apr 1983 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 







110 









Family Group Record- 2071 






Page 2 of 2 




Husband John W NELSON-4502 






I 




wife Nikki Lou ORMOND-4506 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


6 


M | Kerry George NELSON-7103 






Spouse 










Married Place | SeaISp 






7 


M |KentNELSON-7104 






Bom 2 Jan 1964 Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1972 






Chr. J Place 


Endowed 


16Apr1983 


IFALL 




Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried [ Place 












Spouse Heidi GULBRANSEN-71 05 






MRIN: 3588_, 




Married 18Jun1983 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho jseaisp 


18Jun1983 


IFALL i 


8 


M 


Keith Brian NELSON-7106 






Bom 4 Mar 1973 


piace Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


28 Mar 1981 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


26 Mar 1992 


IFALL 




Died ! Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried ! Place 










spouse KarieJOHNSON-7107 






MRIN: 3589 




Mamed 29 Aua 1996 I Place Loqan, Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


29 Aua 1996 


LOGAN 


9 


M I 












Bom 12 Oct 1974 [ Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Nov 1982 








Chr. Place 


Endowed 


16 Dec 1993 


IFALL 




Died i Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried I Place 




spouse Kristie Lyn COOK-7 1 09 






MRIN: 3590 






Mamed 11 Jul 1997 Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


11 Jul 1997 


IFALL 



4 Mar 2006 



111 





John and Nikki Nelson Family 
Back: Wade, Evelyn, Michael, Third: Brenda, Kent, Julie 
Second: John, Nikki, Kerry Front: Keith, Mark 



112 



JOHN W. & NIKKI ORMOND NELSON 

John was born on Christmas day, December 25, 1935. He was born into the family of 
George Francis Nelson and Susan Isabel Weekes Nelson. His brothers are Chester, Lynn, 
Dennis and Reid Nelson and Ross Weekes. His sisters are Zula Kidd and Glenna McCulloch. 
John is the youngest in the family. 

When he was about two years old, he had pneumonia. It was touch and go for quite a 
while. The doctor put in a tube to drain his lungs and his family carried him around on pillows 
for many days trying to make him comfortable. He carried the scar from that drain tube for the 
rest of his life. 

John loved the farm (except for thinning beets) and loved horses and dogs. He and his 
brothers and cousins spent a lot of time on the backs of the horses. 

He attended school in Archer and graduated from the eighth grade there and then went to 
Rexburg to Madison High School. He was a talented athlete and played basketball and football. 
Often he would walk home from town when he stayed after school for practice. In his senior 
year, he played center on the football team and was a guard on the basketball team. Both those 
teams won the state championship that year. After high school, he played church basketball for 
many years. He always wanted to start a league for players under six feet tall, so shorter players 
wouldn't be at such a disadvantage. 

It was at a high school basketball game in Rigby that he met Nikki Ormond. They went 
to a dance after the game and dated until they were married on June 29, 1955 in the Idaho Falls 
Temple. They moved into a little house close to the store in Archer (now Big Jud's). Later they 
bought a small farm and moved to Sunnydell. John worked at the sugar factory in Lincoln for 
many years and farmed the home place and the dry farm in Kilgore. He milked cows for a while 
and then raised beef cattle. John, Nikki, and the children spent many long hours in the hay truck 
driving back and forth to Kilgore. It was a hundred mile round trip and took almost all day. On 
rare occasions, he would make two trips a day. leaving the boys at Kilgore (between trips) rolling 
hay bales into rows to make it easier to load. 
John and Nikki have nine children: 

John Wade married Lynette Brown. They have four children and live in Green River, 
Wyoming, where he is an accountant for a mining company and bishop of his ward. Lynette 
teaches piano at the university in Rock Springs. Wade served a mission in the Cali Colombia 
Mission. Their daughter served in the Philippines and they have a son now serving in Brisbane, 
Australia. 

Julie Ann married Bob Thompson. They have four sons and one daughter and six 
grandchildren. Bob has his own paving business and they live in Archer. Their sons served 
missions in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Des Moines, Iowa, Toronto Canada missions and their 
youngest son in now serving in Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Michael Clyde married Natalie Burns. He has five children (two from a previous 
marriage.) Mike served his mission in downtown Los Angeles. They live in Meadow. Utah 
where he has been raising Black Angus cattle and driving truck. Natalie is getting her nursing 
degree. 

Evelyn Kay was married to Mark Peterson, but they are divorced. She has two daughters 
and one son and two grandsons. She is the customer relations manager at Broadway Ford in 
Idaho Falls. 



113 



Brenda Lucille married Darrell Wheeler. They live in Moore, Idaho. Darrell works at 
the Idaho National Laboratories. They have two daughters and are in the process of building on 
to their home. 

Kerry George works as a landscaper in Jackson, Wyoming during the summers. He 
comes home on weekends to take care of the yard and to serve as librarian in the Sunnydell 
Ward. He served his mission in Brussels, Belgium. 

Kent Gordon married Heidi Gulbransen. They live in Idaho Falls where he is a rural 
delivery postman. They have three sons. Kent served his mission in the Geneva Switzerland 
Mission. 

Keith Brian married Karie Johnson. They live in Menan, Idaho and have fours sons and 
one daughter. Keith served his mission in Arcadia, California and has his own graphic design 
business. He also teaches part time at BYU Idaho. 

Mark Warren married Kristie Cook. They have three sons. They are currently living in 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio where Mark is in medical school. He will graduate this May and begin his 
residency. Mark served his mission in the Knoxville Tennessee Mission. 

John and Nikki were initiatory officiators in the Idaho Falls Temple for several years and 
John served as a counselor in the Elders Quorum Presidency. 

John loved to hunt and fish. He loved the mountains, horses and camping. He loved 
riding snow machines and boating. He loved people, but he liked them a few at a time. He was 
a little uncomfortable in front of large congregations. 

John loved his children and was so proud of his grandchildren. He passed away March 
26, 1983 at the age of 47. He was perfectly healthy that morning and collapsed with an 
aneurysm in his head, while he was out in the corral feeding cattle. He never regained 
consciousness. After he died, Nikki learned of many acts of service he had given over the years 
to neighbors, friends and family while she was working at Ricks College. He was a good father 
and had a strong testimony of Jesus Christ and the Church. 

Nikki retire from the college in 1999 and served a mission to Brisbane, Australia in 2000- 
2001. Currently, she is finishing up a part-time mission in the Family History Center at BYU 
Idaho and has just received her call for a full-time mission to Manchester, England where she 
will work in the mission office. 



114 



Family Group Record- 2193 



Page 1 of 1 





Husband George Francis NELSON-6253 








Bom 26 Aug 1896 i Place Weston, Franklin, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates | Temple 




Chr I Place 


Baptized 


1 Jul 1906 | 




Died 6 Sep 1985 (Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


22 Dec 191 5 LOGAN 




Buned 8 Sep 1985 j Place Sutton Cemetery Archer, Madison. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


Mamed 22 Dec 1915 Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


22 Dec 1915! SLAKE j 




other spouse Susan Isabel WEEKES-61 1 




MRIN 2123 ! 




Mamed 6 Feb 1929 I Place LOGAN, Cache. Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


6 Feb 1929 i LOGAN I 


i 

I 

I 

• 


other spouse Alice Malinda LAYCOCK-9521 




MRIN: 2194 j 


Mamed 1 Apr 1954 ! Place Idaho, Falls, IdahoFalls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


| | 


other spouse Thelma Lucille CARLSON- 10794 




MRIN: 2209 


Mamed 4 Dec 1969 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


j 


other spouse Mary Lilly Bayliff BRIGGS-1 0795 




MRIN 4272 


Mamed 4 Sep 1976 ! Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


i 
I 


Husbands father Nels NELSON-951 8 




MRIN: 2195 




l 


Husband's mother Hannah Robinson Brown GILL-9519 








wife Susan Elizabeth WEEKES-9520 






Bom 26 Aug 1894 j Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 






Chr. I Place 


Baptized 


7 Sep 1902 




j 


Died 7 Nov 1927 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho. USA 


Endowed 


22 Dec 1915 




Buried 10 Nov 1927 ! Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 




wife's father George Sidney WEEKES-61 26 




MRIN: 2134 






wife's mother Mary Ann BRIGGS-6265 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


M Chester, George NELSON-13934 






Bom 4 Mar 1917 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1925! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


30Auq1936 


IFALL 




Died 13Auq2003 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




i 


Buried 16Aua2003 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 




spouse lna Mae HATTON-1 3938 




MRIN: 6089 


2 




Married 30Auq1956 ! Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


30 Aug 1956! 


M | Lynn Charles NELSON-13935 








Bom 30 Apr 1920 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


30Jun1938! 


chr 6Jun1920 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


22 Nov 1940 ! SLAKE ! 






Died 16 Jan 1993 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried 19 Jan 1993 I Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 




spouse Maiorie C. EVANS-13939 




MRIN: 6090 ] 






Married 19Jun1946 ! Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


19Jun1946l IFALL I 


3 


F Zula Susan NELSON-1 3936 




Bom 4 Mar 1924 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jul 1932 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Apr 1946 


SLAKE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 


I 


spouse Henry Foryl KIDD-1 3940 




MRIN: 6091 


4 




Mamed 26 Aua 1949 ! Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


26 Aug 1949: SLAKE 


F | 








Bom 1 Nov 1927 


Place Archer, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Nov 1935 


i 
l 

i 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Aug 1965 


Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC | 


Buried | Place 






spouse Wallace Foulqer MCCULLOCK-1 3893 




MRIN: 6064 






Mamed 4 Sep 1948 i Place Dillon. Beaverhead. Montana 


SeaISp 


17 Aug 1965 1 IFALL 



11 Feb 2006 



115 







Family Group Record- 3537 




Page 1 of 1 


Husbai ELSO 




Bom 4 Mar 1917 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


Chr. I Place 


Baptized 3JuM925| 




Died 13 Auq 2003 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 30 Auq 1936 J IFALL 




Buried 16 Auq 2003 Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar BIC j 




Married 30 Auq 1956 ' Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


seaisp 30 Auq 1956 I IFALL 




Husbands tether Georqe Francis NELSON-1296 


MRIN: 533 




Husband-smother Susan Elizabeth WEEKES-4497 




wife |na Mae HATTON-6952 




Bom 3 Oct 1906 


Place Owinqsville, Bath, Kentucky 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 4 Oct 1914 




Died 27 Oct 1981 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 30Auq1956 


IFALL 


Buried 31 Oct 1981 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 30 SeD 1952 






Wifes father Eastwood HATTON-6951 


MRIN: 3540 




wife's mother Lizzie Lee STROUT-6955 





Carl Nykamp 
208=523-7378 



I Preparedby^ 
! Phone_ 

E-mailaddress carl@srvjnyjt.net 
I Dateprepared 4 Mar 2006 



Address 14Q54 N 65 E 



Jdaho Falls 
Idaho 



_83401 USA 



116 



CHESTER GEORGE NELSON FAMILY 

Chester George Nelson was born March 4, 1917 at Archer, Idaho, to George Francis 
Nelson and Susan Elizabeth Weekes. He was the pride and joy of his parents. It wasn't until he 
was able to sit and play that it was discovered he was deaf. When pans were dropped on the 
floor by him. and he didn't move. His ear drums were injured at birth which left him truly deaf 

His mother and Grandfather George Weekes took him to Gooding, Idaho, to see if he 
could be helped. They didn't like the way the patients were cared for there so they brought 
Chester home and he spent his childhood and early teen years in a world of silence. He 
learned to lip read and was taught by showing him what he should do. His parents and 
grandparents really watched over him and really spoiled him. 

April 30, 1920 his brother Lynn was bom, Chester was so happy over his baby brother. 
He loved Lynn so much and came to rely on his help throughout his life. When Lynn went to 
school, Chester went to school with him. Even though he was unable to hear he was able to 
associate with the boys and girls at school. Eventually, he learned to tell time and learned the 
colors. He was able to handle his money and make good decisions. 

March 4, 1924 his sister Zula was born, now he had a sister to share his birthday with. He 
has spent many birthdays with her and her family. November 1, 1927 his sister Glenna was 
bom. Just a few days later his mother passed away leaving her husband and four children. 
Chester was 10 years old when his mother died. He missed her so much, life was a struggle for 
him after that. 

Chester's father, George, married Susan Isabel Weekes, his mother's cousin, on February 
6, 1929, in the Logan Utah Temple. Isabel was a nurse and had been helping George to care for 
the new baby and the other children. They purchased a farm in Archer and eventually built a 
new brick home. Three other brothers were bom to the family, Dennis, Reid and John. They 
were a big happy family. Every family in the valley was struggling and worked together to 
survive the Depression years. They bought property, so a variety of crops were raised hay, grain, 
potatoes and sugar beets. Everyone hated those long hot days thinning beets. They had milk 
cows, sheep, pigs and chickens to help meet the family's needs. 

Chester was taught how to plow and cultivate potatoes and beets and how to mow and 
rake the hay. He learned quickly and could be trusted to do the job well. In his teen years, the 
family heard of a Belltime Hearing Aid Company. They made an appointment for Chester. He 
was tested and they thought that he could be helped. A hearing aid was made for him. To 
Chester's delight, he was able to hear words and sounds, like birds and music. One day, at the 
dinner table, one of the family made a remark about Chester. He turned to them and said, "I 
heard what you said about me." After that, everyone was very careful what was said, we made 
sure it was always positive. 

As Chester grew older and other members of the family were getting married and moving 
away, he wanted a new life. His father helped him buy the Charles Jeppson farm and old home, 
located about Vi mile from home. Now Chester was on his own, but his father always kept a 
watchful eye on him and gave him fatherly suggestions. He did very well and was soon able to 
purchase a car, his own Ferguson tractor and farm equipment. He did a lot of sawing wood for 
neighbors and friends. He also did a lot of custom mowing, bailing hay and grain cutting for 
neighbors around the valley. He enjoyed going to the mountains for a winters supply of wood, 
fishing trips with his father, brothers and uncle Isaac Nelson. 

Merlin Orr, a neighbor, served a mission in Kentucky where he met Madge. After his 
mission Madge came out and met his family and they were later married. Madge's sister Ina 



117 



came for the wedding and met Chester. It was love at first sight for Chester. He had finally met a 
lovely girl. He and Ina Mae were married in the Idaho Falls Temple, August 30, 1956. They 
fixed up the old Jeppson home until they were able to build their present home. They built a 
Grade A milking barn and sold milk to the creamery. Often you would see them going hand in 
hand to the milking barn, with Ina in her bonnet and bib overalls. They loved their cows and little 
calves, and each one was given a special name. Through much planning and hard work they were 
able to build their new home. They were truly happy and meant for each other. Ina was a true 
helpmate. 

They found time for a few trips: one to Kentucky to meet Ina's family, which Chester 
enjoyed, a trip to Canada to visit relatives there, fishing trips and a visit to Yellowstone Park. 
They spent time at the temple doing sealings. They were both very active in the Archer Ward. 
Their yard was full of beautiful flowers and they always had a big vegetable garden. They loved 
to watch the Lawrence Welk Show. 

Into each life some rain must fall, everything was going swell until Ina became ill. She 
was told she had cancer. She passed away October 27, 1981. Chester was completely lost and 
had a very hard time dealing with her death. He continued milking cows and farming but 
eventually sold his cows. 

A few years later, he married Nona Young. He became ill and was sick a lot. So, he was 
placed in a Nursing Home in Rexburg. He did not enjoy it there and longed to be at home. Nona 
was killed in a car accident in May of 1998. Chester's sisters and brothers got him released from 
the Nursing Home. He went to live with his sister Glenna for several months. He began feeling 
much better and wanted to be back in his own home. He lived there alone for six years. 

Two weeks before Chester passed away, the doctors discovered he had cancer. He had 
been in a lot of pain. Saturday, August 9, 2003 the water was in his ditch and he just had to get 
out and water his lawn. Ada Greene had been watering her yard also and she had noticed that his 
back door was open. So she and Wilma checked on him and found him lying on his kitchen 
floor. She called Dennis and he and his sister Glenna came over. They got him to bed where he 
passed away three days later. 

Chester & Ina Mae Nelson 





Chester & Ina Nelson 



118 









Family Group Record 






Pagel of 2 


Husband Lynn Charles NELSON 








Bom 30_Apr 1920 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 6Jun1920 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


30 Jun 1938 


i 

1 


Died 16 Jan 1993 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


22 Nov 1940 SLAKE 


Buned 19 Jan 1993 ! Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC| 




Mamed 19 Jun 1946 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


19 Jun 1946 IFALL 




Husbands father George Francis NELSON 






Husband's mother Susan Elizabeth WEEKES 








wife C. EVANS 






Bom 10 Oct 1924 j Place Sugar City, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place Sugar City, Madison. Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Nov 1932 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


19 Jun 1946 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's father Edward, Partington EVANS 






wife's mother Sarah Otera CLUFF 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


F Lynda Majorie NELSON 






Bom 15 Oct 1947 i Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Nov 1955 ! 




Chr. j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


7 Nov 1970! IFALL 




Died Place 


SealPar 


BICT 




Buried j Place 




Spouse Unknown 


2 




Married Place 


SeaISp 


I 


F 


Marsha Ann NELSON 




Bom 26 Sep 1948 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


29 Sep 1956] 


i 


Chr. 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


19 Jun 1975! IFALL 


i 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICT 


! 


Buried 


Place 




spouse David VON NOYES 


3 




Married 19Jun1975 Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


19 Jun 1975 i IFALL 


F 


Ruth NELSON 






Bom 31 Mar 1951 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 May 1959; 




Chr. 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


19 Jul 1973 OGDEN 




Died i Place 


SealPar 


BICl 




Buried i Place 




spouse Richard Gill CANNON 






Mamed 9 Sep 1976 ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


9 Seo 1976! SLAKE 


4 


F 


Donna NELSON 






Bom 30 Mar 1953 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1961 








Chr. 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


26 Apr 1975 


IFALL 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


. BIC 




i 


Buried 


Place 






spouse Danny Alt 
Married 2 May 1975 


ert ROWLEY 








Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


2Mav1975! IFALL 


5 


F i Sara LaRee NELSON 






Bom 24 Jun 1956 j Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1964: 




Chr. | Place Archer, Madsson, Idaho 


Endowed 


31 Jul 1981 IFALL 




Died j Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried | Place 






spouse William Aldon BRINTON 








Mamed 31 Jul 1981 I Place Idaho. Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


31 Jul 1981 I IFALL 


6 


M 


Lynn Charles NELSON 






Bom 23 Mar 1963 


Place Rexburg. Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


27 Mar 1971 




Chr. 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


13 Mar 1982 


IFALL 




Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buned ] Place 




spouse Jana Lee MUNNS 








Married 26 May 1984 Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


26Mav1984| IFALL 


7 


F 


Beverly Nelson NELSON 






Bom 6 Feb 1965 


piace Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Mar 1973 j 




Chr 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 
SealPar 


13 Nov 1984! IFALL 
BIC| 






Died 


Place 






I Buried j Place 










Spouse Larry Keith JOHNSON 








Married 17 Nov 1984 j Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


17 Nov 1984 IFALL 



6 Apr 2006 



119 






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120 



LYNN CHARLES & MARJORIE EVANS NELSON FAMILY 

Lynn, the second son of George Francis Nelson and Susan Elizabeth Weekes was born 
April 30. 1920 at Archer, Idaho. He grew up and worked on a farm. When he was seven years 
old, his dear mother died at the birth of his little sister, Glenna. Susan Isabel Weekes, having had 
training as a nurse, came to care for Glenna and the other children. In time George and Isabel 
were married in the Logan temple, Feb 6, 1929. Life was difficult and all the family had to work 
hard. On March 23, 1930, while George and Lynn were doing the chores and Isabel was away 
helping with the birth of Cliff Grover's baby, the house caught fire around the chimney and 
burned to the ground. The children were saved but most everything else burned, including the 
new suits that had just been purchased for Lynn and Chester. This was hard for the two boys 
who had never had new suits before and were looking forward to wearing them. This was a 
difficult time for all of the family. 

Lynn served a mission to the Northern States. He also served in the Sunday School as 
Superintendent, in the Seventies Quorum, bishopric, ward and stake Sunday School, and as a 
High priest group leader and home teacher. 

Lynn married Marjorie Evans, on June 19, 1946 in the Idaho Falls Temple. 
Lynn worked at many jobs, along with farming and running a dairy with his son Lynn Jr. His last 
job was at Ricks College working in the library for twenty years. 

I have worked many years for the school district. I have also been a teacher in most 
auxiliary organizations. President of the Primary and Relief Society, counselor in the Relief 
Society and Mutual, Chorister in the Primary and Sunday School, and music director for 
Sacrament Meeting and choir. I served a mission in Carlsbad, California after Lynn's death. 
Lynn and I also had the opportunity of officiating in initiatory in the Idaho Falls temple for many 
years. We have seven children. I am grateful for my family and grateful that they are active in 
the church. Our children are Lynda, Marsha, Ruth, Donna, Sara, Lynn & Beverley. 

Lynda Marjorie Nelson: I loved the area and farm where I grew up. I graduated from 
Ricks College and then from Utah State University. I have worked as a medical technologist and 
computer coordinator. I served a mission in Brazil and have had a variety of church callings 
over the years, with the Young Women, Relief Society, Primary and Sunday School. I currently 
serve as an ordinance worker in the Jordan River Temple, visiting teacher and gospel doctrine 
teacher. I enjoy music, hiking, reading, family history and traveling. I especially enjoy my 
family, my mother, sisters and brother, and my nieces and nephews, they bring great joy to my 
life. ' 

Marsha Ann Nelson Noyes: I am the second daughter and child of Marjorie and Lynn 
Nelson. I graduated from Madison High School. I taught in Ucon for 2 years. I finished my 
teaching degree at BYU and have taught second grade in Preston, Idaho for the last 23+ years. I 
married David Yon Noyes and we have 7 children. We have held various church callings. I have 
been Relief Society President, Young Women's President and a Primary counselor. I am 
currently chorister in Primary (my favorite job). I have sung with a community choir and with a 
quartet over the last 26 years. My husband David, has been scoutmaster in our ward. He is 
currently the bishop of our ward. 

Our oldest daughter is Terra Ann Sleight. She is married to Brian Sleight who served a 
mission in San Bernardino, California. They have two children, Dylan age 5 and Hannah age 2. 
She has one more year at Utah State to finish her teaching degree. 



121 



Our son, David Lynn filled a mission in San Jose, California Spanish speaking. He is 
married to Nichole Wortham. He is an Idaho State Police officer for the area surrounding 
Preston. They have 3 little girls: Madison age 4, McKenzie age 3, and Mariah age 2. Nichole 
works for her dad in his doctors office. David currently teaches the Teachers of the Young men 
group. Nichole sees that the nursery is staffed and running for Enrichment Meeting. 

Richard has filled a mission in Columbia, South Carolina. He has one more year at Utah 
State to finish his degree in Music and then will teach band. He is married to Marianne Graff. 
She has a degree in English, but chooses to be a stay at home mom for their two little boys, Jacob 
age 2 and Ethan 8 months. Marianne is the Primary President in her student ward. Richard is the 
Gospel Doctrine teacher. 

Susan has filled a mission in Porto Alegre North, Brazil. She is currently working at 
Pizza Villa in Preston and attending the singles ward there. She is a ward missionary, Gospel 
Principles teacher, Relief Society teacher, and ward chorister. 

Janice is currently attending Idaho State University. She is majoring in Social Work. She 
is working at a day care that she loves. Janice is the Gospel Doctrine teacher in her singles ward. 

Jennifer and Janice are twins. Jennifer is married to Joshua Ballard who filled a mission 
in Miami, Florida. She is working at Convergys. She is helping Josh finish his college education 
at Utah State University in Business Finance. 

Nathaniel has just graduated from Preston High School. He has been involved in band 
and acappella choir. He has been the lead in Oklahoma and in community plays of Seven Brides 
for Seven Brothers and Annie Get Your Gun. He plans to continue his education. 

Ruth Nelson Cannon: I married Richard Cannon September 9, 1976. We have 5 children. 
Richard died of colon rectal cancer, March 28, 1997. Our children are: Katrina, Richard Dean, 
Joseph Lynn, Krystle Ann, and Jonathan Hugh. 

Katrina, born July 21, 1977, graduated from the University of Utah with honors and is 
working as an associate editor for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

Richard, born March 23, 1979, served in the California San Fernando Spanish speaking 
mission. He married Megan Paddock August 3, 2000. He will graduate from Weber State 
University in December with a degree in Construction Management. They have two children, 
Carter Thomas born July 25, 2001 and Maxston Richard born October 5, 2003. 

Joseph, born January 9, 1983, served in the California Los Angeles Spanish speaking 
mission and is currently attending the University of Utah. 

Krystle, born May 6, 1984 died soon after birth. 

Jonathan, born March 15, 1990, just finished 9th grade. He is a great student and 
especially loves music. He plays clarinet with the Utah Youth Symphony Orchestra and also 
enjoys playing the piano and various other woodwind instruments. 

Richard served a mission in Washington State and I served a mission in Peru. 

Donna Nelson Rowley: I was born on March 30, 1953 in Archer, Idaho at my grandpa 
and grandma Nelson's home. We lived in a humble home in Archer where we were taught the 
gospel of Jesus Christ, the value of hard work, the value of education, and the importance of 
families through the example of loving parents whom I am grateful for. 

I graduated from Madison High School in 1971. Then attended Ricks College, now 
BYU-Idaho, and graduated in 1973. I continued my education at BYU in Provo, Utah where I 
graduated with a Bachelors degree in Elementary Education in 1977. While at BYU, I met and 



122 



married Danny Albert Rowley in the Idaho Falls Temple on May 2, 1975. Dan also graduated 
from BYU with a degree in Physical Education in 1977. After finishing school we moved to 
Shelley, Idaho. 

Dan and I have been blessed with four wonderful children who have chosen to remain 
close to the gospel of Jesus Christ and gain an education. 

Kristie was born May 14, 1976 in Provo, Utah while Dan and I were attending school. 
She graduated from Shelley High School, Ricks College, and BYU and is presently attending 
Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee and will graduate in August of 2005. She will then 
work as a Professor at BYU. She is buying a home in the Springville, Utah area. Kristie also 
served in the Frankfurt German Mission. 

Ryan was born December 10, 1977 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. While attending Ricks College 
he met his wife, Sharon Bingham, also an engineering major. Sharon is working for Hewlett 
Packard, designing printers. Ryan is working for Northrup Grummen designing unmanned 
surveillance aircraft. They have one, Lydia Idelle, who keeps them running. Ryan also served in 
the Jacksonville, Florida Mission and then helped open up the Orlando Florida Mission. 

Trent was born January 22,1980 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. He graduated from Shelley High 
School, and BYU-Idaho with a bachelors degree in business management. After his mission he 
dated and married Laura Harker. He is presently employed at Beehive Insurance in Murray, 
Utah as general manager. Trent and Laura also have a daughter, Kierra Jayne, who keeps them 
running. Laura loves to be home with Kierra and finds a lot of satisfaction in scrap booking. 
Trent served in the Guayaqui Ecuador Mission. 

Lisa was born January 2, 1983 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. She was the Seminary President 
while a Senior at Skyline High School. Lisa is presently attending BYU-Idaho majoring in 
secondary education. While attending BYU-Idaho Lisa met and married Derek Ivie from Arco. 
Derek is also attending BYU-Idaho and is majoring in construction management. Their 
daughter, Michelle Leigh keeps them running. 

Sara LaRee Nelson Brinton: I married William (Aldon) Brinton on July 31, 1981 in the 
Idaho Falls Temple. We lived in Idaho Falls for thirteen years and in 1997 we moved to the 
country in the Osgood area. 

I taught Home Economics at Bonneville High School in Idaho Falls for four years. 1 now 
teach in the Title I program at Longfellow Elementary School in Idaho Falls. 

I have served in many callings in the church. I am presently a Sunday teacher in the 
Relief Society. When there is time I enjoy reading, cooking, sewing, cleaning my home and 
working in the yard. 

Aldon served a mission in New York City. He worked for Burns Brothers Concrete for 
ten years. He has worked for United Parcel Service for nineteen years. He is presently serving as 
the Ward Clerk in the Osgood Ward. We have 6 children. 

Angela Marie Brinton graduated with a History Education Degree from BYU.. She did 
her student teaching in Tonga and had a wonderful experience. She plays the piano and violin. 
She likes to read and her goal is to travel the world. 

Robert Aldon Brinton is presently serving a mission in Columbus, Ohio and he will 
return home Aug. 26, 2005. When he returns he will attend BYU-I. He plays the piano and 
violin and loves playing basketball and having a good time with his friends. 

Sharee Lyn Brinton has been accepted into the Nursing program at BYU-I. She is 
excited and scared to be on her own. She plays the piano and violin and loves to read. 



123 



Julie Ann Brinton attends at Eagle Rock Jr. High. She plays the piano and likes to 
participate in plays. She likes to make new friends and is always willing to help. 

William (Blake) Brinton goes to Eagle Rock Jr. High. He enjoys scouting and will attend 
Cedar Badge this summer. He plays the piano and plays baseball and loves to play basketball. He 
will probably be the tallest one in the family. 

Ashley Michelle Brinton goes to Westside Elementary. She will be baptized in October. 
She also plays the piano very well and she especially likes to play Primary songs. . 

Lynn Charles Nelson Jr.: Lynn was born March 23, 1963 the sixth child and only son of 
Lynn and Marjorie. He served a mission to San Jose, California. After returning from his 
mission he married Jana Lee Munns, May 26, 1984 in the Idaho Falls Temple. She is the 
youngest daughter of Harry and Vonda Munns. We were blessed with three children: 

Lynn Charles Nelson III was born February 6,1985. He likes football and enjoys playing 
the piano. He served a mission to Winnipeg, Canada. 

Melanie Lee Nelson was born August 11, 1988. She is involved in track, throwing the 
shot-put and discus. She plays the piano and has become very good at it. 

Mandy Lee Nelson was born December 14, 1993. She loves to dance and play basketball 
and has just recently earned her Faith in God award in primary. 

We have made our home in Archer, where we currently farm, work and play together as a 
family and are very involved in our church activities. 

Beverly Nelson Johnson: I am the youngest daughter of Lynn and Marjorie Nelson. I 
graduated from Ricks College with an associate degree in accounting. While I was attending 
Ricks, I married Keith Johnson in the Idaho Falls Temple. Keith served a mission in Chile. We 
have lived in Green River, Wyoming and near Boston, Massachusetts. We now live in Menan, 
Idaho where we love to be surrounded by our neighbors, friends and families. Keith was a 
residential contractor for many years. We have a Family Fun Park in Rigby. 

Our oldest son, Brian, was born in November of 1985 in Rock Springs, WY. He 
graduated from Rigby High School with high honors. Brian was married in the Idaho Falls 
Temple in August 2004 to Alii Hansen. They are expecting their first child in October of 2005. 
Brian and Alii are both working for Melelueca and living in Idaho Falls. 

Jason was born in December of 1987 in Rock Springs, WY. He has played on the school 
basketball team and has been on the varsity golf team the last two years. He loves to hunt and is 
getting quite accurate with his bow. Jason works at Broulims in Rigby. 

Aaron was born December of 1991 in Rexburg, ID. He is very loving and kindhearted. 
He has a love for band and plays the trombone. He really enjoys reading. Aaron is very much 
into scouting and is looking forward to all his campouts this summer. 

Landon was born March 1995 in Rexburg, ID. He is a very active boy and has a 
wonderful imagination. He can build anything with Legos or K-Nex. He loves sports and 
outdoor activities of all kinds. 

Marci was born August 1999 in Rexburg, ID. Yes, she is spoiled and loved just as she 
should be. She loves to play dolls and do anything that her brothers are doing at the time. She is 
playing Tee Ball this summer. She is a very sweet girl and has a lot of faith in her Heavenly 
Father. She loves listening to the scripture stories on her CDs and can quote most all of them. 



124 



Missionary Descendants of Lynn Marjorie Nelson 2006 



Lynn Nelson, Northern States 

Marjorie Nelson, Carlsbad, California 

David Von Noyes, Northern States 

David Lynn Noyes, California 

Richard E. Noyes, South Carolina 

Susan Marie Noyes, Brazil 

Ruth Cannon, Peru 

Richard Dean Cannon, California 

Richard Gill Cannon, Washington State 

Joseph Lynn Cannon, California 

Danny Albert Cannon, Argentina 

Kristie Jan Rowley, Germany 

Ryan Dan Rowley, Florida 

Trent James Rowley, Equador 

William Aldon Brinton, Eastern States & New York 

Robert Aldon Brinton, Ohio 

Keith Larry Johnson, Chile 

Lynn Charles Nelson Jr., California 

Lynn Charles Nelson III, Winnipeg , Canada 

Derek Ivie, Independence, Missouri 



125 



Family Group Record- 3539 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Henrv Foryl KIDD-6954 




' — 


Bom 3 May 1926 


Place Marysville, Freemont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 






Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


29 Jul 1934 








Died 16 Feb 1998 


Place Rjqby, Jefferson, Idaho 


Endowed 


26Auq1949 


SLAKE 






Buried 19 Feb 1998 


Place Pineview. Cemetery. Ashton, Freemont, Idaho 


SealPar 


20 Jun 1928 


LOGAN 






Married 26 Auq 1949 (D) 


Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


26Auq1949 


SLAKE 






Husband's father Henry Mike Lee KIDD-71 74 


MRIN: 3542 




i 


Husband-smother Veda HENDRICKS-7175 






wife Zula Susan NELSON-6950 






Bom 4 Mar 1924 i Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 






Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


2 Jul 1932 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Apr 1946 


SLAKE 






Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








wife's father Georqe Francis NELSON- 1296 


MRIN: 533 






wife's mother Susan Elizabeth WEEKES-4497 






Children List each child in order of birth. j LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




F 


Susan JoAnne KIDD-71 76 






Bom 9 Feb 1950 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


29 Mar 1958! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


15 Oct 1977 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse 






Married j Place | SeaISp 


i 


F 


Janice Lanette KIDD-71 77 






Bom 27 Feb 1951 


Place Ashton, Freemont, Idaho 


Baptized 


28 Feb 1959 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


5 Jan 1973 


SLAKE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






spouse Georqe Randall OLSEN-71 78 


MRIN: 3620 






Married 5 Jan 1973 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah I seaiSp 


5 Jan 1973! SLAKE 




F 


Kathleen KIDD-71 79 






Bom 19 May 1952 


Place Ashton, Freemont. Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jul 1960 






I 


Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Apr 1975 


IFALL 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 


Place 




spouse Duane E. MOON-7180 


MRIN: 3621 




Married 4 Apr 1975(D) I Place Idaho, Falls. Bonneville. Idaho Tseaisp 


4 Apr 1975 I IFALL 




F 


Barbara KIDD-71 81 




i 


Bom 25Auq1953 


pjace Ashton, Freemont, Idaho 


Baptized 


14 Nov 1961 






Chr. 6 Sep 1953 


Place Ashton, Freemont, Idaho 


Endowed 


12 Dec 1975 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






spouse Nathan J. BREWSTER-7182 


MRIN: 3622 




Married 12 Dec 1975 I Place Idaho. Falls, Bonneville. Idaho I seaJSp 


12 Dec 1975 1 IFALL 




M 


Foryl N. KIDD-71 83 






Bom 9 Feb 1955 I Place Ashton, Freemont, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Mar 1963 








Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


17 May 1974 


IFALL 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 


Place 






spouse Martha Dariene DAVIS-7184 


MRIN: 3623 




Married 15 Oct 1977 I Place Idaho. Falls. Bonneville. Idaho [seaisp 


15 Oct 1977! IFALL 




M 


George Henry KIDD-71 86 






Bom 3 Jan 1957 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Feb 1965 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


20 Mar 1976 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 


Place 








i Spouse Cheryl Jean DAVIS-7187 


MRIN: 3624 






Married 27 Dec 1978 I Place Idaho. Falls. Bonneville, Idaho Iseaisp 


27 Dec 1978 I IFALL 




Prep 


aredby Cari Nykamp 


Address H054 N 65 E 


Phor 


» 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 


E-maii address cari(5)srv.mvrf.net 


Idaho 


Date 


Prepared 5 Jun 2006 


83401 USA 



126 



Family Group Record- 3539 



Page 2 of 2 



Husband Henry Foryl KIDD-6954 


wife Zula Susan NELSON-6950 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M i Marvin Joe KIDD-71 J 


58 


p — 


Bom 26 Jul 1959 


Place Rexburg, Madison^ Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Aug 1967 




chr 6 Sep 1959 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


16 Dec 1978 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SeafPar 


BIC 1 




Buried 


Place 






spouse Lori Jeanne HANDCOCK-7 189 




MRIN: 3625 


Mamed 10 Sep 1977 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


16 060 1978^ IFALL 


F 


Donna Lou KIDD-71 90 




Bom 7 Dec 1960 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Feb 1969 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


2 Nov 1996 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Tobe Alan GASSER-7191 




MRIN: 3626 


Mamed 14 Nov 1979(D) I Place Rjrie. Jefferson, Idaho 


SeaISp 




spouse Steve OLSEN-7313 




MRIN: 3696 


Mamed 13Dec2003 (place Osaood. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 




M 


David Lee KIDD-71 92 




Bom 7 Dec 1960 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Feb 1969 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


25 Jul 1980 


IFALL 


Died 14Jun1992 


Place Twin Falls, Twin Falls, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 19Jun1992 


Place Pineview Cemetery, Ashton, Freemont, Idaho 


Spouse 


Married ] Place 


SeaISp 


i 

j 



127 




Back: Barbara, Kathleen, Foryl Jr. George, Janice, Susan 
Front: Joe, David, Zula, Foryl, Donna 




Foryl & Zula Kidd Family 
Joe, Susan, Barbara, Janice, Zula, George, Kathleen, Donna 
Foryl Jr. Above Left: Foryl Above Right: David 



128 



ZULA SUSAN & H. FORYL KIDD FAMILY 

Zula Susan Nelson was born March 4, 1 924 at Archer, Idaho to George Francis Nelson 
and Susan Elizabeth Weekes. At the age of 3 X A , my mother passed away leaving 4 children, 
Chester, Lynn, Zula and Glenna (7 days old). It was a very sad time. I do have a few cherished 
memories of my mother. 

Isabel Weeks, a first cousin to my mother, was a registered nurse. She came into our 
home and cared for our family. It was through her special care that my father and we children 
were able to survive the tragedy in our lives. Sometime later, my father married Isabel in the 
Salt Lake Temple. To that marriage three brothers were added, Dennis, Reid and John. 

In the 1930's everyone suffered hard times because of the depression years. Families, 
friends and neighbors worked together and helped one another. I graduated from Madison High 
School in 1942 and worked at many odd jobs. 

At this time our Country was at war with Germany. Many of our young men were called 
to serve our country. Many young men lost their lives. In 1946 and 1947, 1 was called to serve a 
mission in the Eastern States. While there I had the privilege of visiting the Sacred Grove and 
The Hill Cumorah. 

After returning home from my mission, I met H. Foryl Kidd from Ashton. We were 
married in the Salt Lake Temple on August 26, 1949. We lived in the Ashton area for several 
years. After mother Isabel passed away we moved to Archer, Idaho to be closer to Dad. We 
decided to build a home there. 

We were blessed with 9 children, Susan, Janice, Kathleen, Barbara, Foryl Jr., George, 
Joe, Donna and David (twins). They have been the pride and joy of our lives. We've spent 
many happy times together as a family. 

Foryl taught school for 24 years throughout the valley and I worked for 17 years at Ricks 
College in the food service. 

We had 3 sons serve missions: Foryl Jr. went to the Scotland Mission from 1974 to 
1976. George went to the Navajo Indian Reservation in Arizona and New Mexico from 1976 to 
1978. David went to the England Mission for 1980 to 1982. 

Our family has had some difficult times and many heartaches. David was killed in a car 
accident on June 14, 1992 while returning from a job in California. Father, H. Foryl passed 
away February 16. 1998. We have 40 grandchildren, 3 passed away in infancy and a grandson. 
Bill Moon passed away at age 19. We have 36 living grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren. 

Foryl and Marti have a son Jacob, who served a mission in Texas from 1999-2001, and 
their daughter Anya is preparing to leave. Joe and Lori's son Jeremiah served a mission in the 
Philippines from 1997 to 1999 and their daughter Tiffany is serving in Albuquerque, New 
Mexico and will be home in 2005. Barbara and Nathan's son Nathan is now serving in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma and will return in 2007. 

All of our family have served in many church callings. We love the Lord and are grateful 
for the gospel in our lives and all the blessings we receive as a family from day to day. It is our 
prayer that we will be faithful in keeping God's commandments and that we will truly listen to 
our prophet, President Gordon B. Hinckley and do as he has counseled so that we will be 
together as a family and be with Heavenly Father again some day. 



129 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 





Husband Wallace Foulqer MCCULLOCH 










Bom 23 Apr 1922 


Place Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


I 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1932 






Died 18 Dec 2005 


Place Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


17 Aug 1965 


FALL 




Buned 22 Dec 2005 


Place Suaar Citv Cemetery, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 








Married 4 Sep 1948 


Place Dillon, Beaverhead, Montana 


SeaISp 


17Aua1965 


IFALL 




Husbands father Georqe William MCCULLOCK 










Husband's mother Evelyn HUFF 






i 




wife Glenna Mary NELSON 






i 


— 


Bom 1 Nov 1927 


Place Archer, Madison Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


2 Nov 1935 








Died 


Place 


Endowed 


17Aua1965 


IFALL i 






Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








wife's father George Francis NELSON 










wrfes mother Susan Elizabeth WEEKES 










Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


1 


M | Blair N. MCCULLOCH 




Bom 2 Jan 1953 (Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Mar 1961 




i 


Chr Place 


Endowed 






Died ! Place 


SealPar 


17AugJ965 


IFALL 




Buried ; Place 








I 


spouse Zina Elizabeth HARRIS 




Married 6 Nov 1969 (D) I Place Rexbura. Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 








spouse Jackie Lyn WEBSTER 




Married (D) ! Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 






I 


spouse Jackie Sue SPRAGUE 


2 




Married 26 Apr 1988 (D) I Place Rexburq. Madison. Idaho 


SeaISp 




| 


F VICCULLO 










, 


Bom 26 Mar 1955 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


26 Apr 1963 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


18Jun 1980 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


17Aua1965 


IFALL 

i 




Buried 


Place 








spouse Gary Dee OWENS 




Married 22 Jan 1971 i Place Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


18Jun1980 


IFALL i 



130 




Glenna & Wallace McCulloch Family 
Back: Marlene and Blair 
Front: Glenna and Wallace 



131 



WALLACE & GLENNA MCCULLOCH FAMILY 

Wallace was born in Hibbard, Madison County, Idaho, April 23, 1922. He attended 
school at Hibbard Elementary then went to Madison High School. I was born in Archer, 
Madison County, Idaho, November 1, 1927. I attended Archer Elementary then went to Madison 
High School and graduated in 1945. Wallace served in the Philippines and Japan in World War 
II. I went to Ricks College for two years, to become a teacher. I met Wallace while in college. I 
graduated from Ricks College in 1947 and taught my first year at Rockford Elementary west of 
Blackfoot. I came back to Rexburg and taught in the Madison School District for 37 years. 
While I was teaching I finished two more years of college at BYU. Wallace and I were married 
September 4, 1948. 

Blair was born January 2, 1953 in Rexburg. Wallace worked 24 campaigns at the 
Lincoln Sugar Factory. We bought the place where we still live, when Blair was six months old. 
Marlene was born March 26, 1955 in Rexburg, Idaho. It seemed necessary that we both work to 
pay for our home and farm. Wallace farmed 320 acres of dry farm and 50 acres of irrigated land. 
We built our new home in 1962. The home we are in survived the Teton Dam Flood in 1976. 

We enjoy dancing, snowmobiling, boating and fishing. Blair and Marlene attended 
school in Hibbard, Burton and Madison. Marlene became very good at dancing when she was 
young. 

We went to the Idaho Falls Temple in 1965. Our marriage was solemnized and our 
children were sealed to us. That was a very happy day. 

Blair has two sons and one daughter. His sons are both married and have children. His 
daughter is almost 14 years old and going to school in St. Anthony. Blair owns a 10 wheeler 
truck and works for H&K most of the time and is doing well. 

Marlene married Gary Owens and they have two children, Brian and Celeste. Gary is a 
retired firefighter after 25 years. Marlene is the secretary for Adams Elementary. Brian is 
married to Lisa Anderson and they are the proud parents of Braeden who is one year old. Brian 
is a carpenter and Lisa is a stay at home mom. Celeste has finished one year of college at ISU 
and plans to go to Nauvoo to study for a semester this fall. 

Wallace and I are pretty old now. Wallace turned 83 on his birthday. He has had many 
health problems including pneumonia 5 times. Now he has breathing problems. I have been 
pretty healthy so far and hope that it continues. Wallace and I will be celebrating our 57 th 
anniversary this fall. 

Wallace passed away December 18, 2005, at his home in Hibbard, Madison, Idaho, and 
is buried in the Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho. 



132 







Family Group Record- 4295 




Page 1 of 1 


Husband William Lyman WEEKES-61 12 




Bom 2 Max 1900 


place Sunnydell, Fremont, ID 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 3 Jul 1908 




Died 12 Jan 1917 


Place Sunnydell, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 1 Feb 1917 


LOGAN 


Buried 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar BIC 






Married Place 


SeaISp 






Husbands father John Samuel WEEKES-777 


MRIN. 1721 j 


Husband's mother Ida Isabel GROVE R-6308 




wife unmarried 


I 


Bom ) Place 


LOS ordinance dates 


Temple 


i 

i 


Chr 


Place 


Baptized 


I 
j 


i 


Died 


Place 


Endowed 


I 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


Wife's father 




Wife's mother 





t I 

mmMmrnmKmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsmtm 

\ William Lyman Weekes i 
| Son of John & Ida Weekes. | 
\ Died of peritonitis in 1917. \ 




Leslie and Lyman Weekes 



133 



WILLIAM LYMAN WEEKES 

Lyman was the son of John and Ida Grover Weekes. He was born May 2, 1900, at 
Sunnydell. He was the third child and second son. He was just older than Bertha. The only trips 
we took were to the hills for huckleberries. Lyman would pick a few then lay on his back and 
look at the sky. When his were gone he would come over and get into my little bucket and get 
some of mine. I would yell to Mother and she would see that he left mine alone. I think I was 
about eight and he was ten at that time. 

We use to go huckleberrying with Grandpa and Grandma Grover. Mother was their only 
living daughter. We generally went on Windy Ridge. The road was much different then. There 
was not so much dead timber because everyone burned wood and had horses to pull it to the 
wagon. I remember the long grass and little delicate bluebells. How we loved to pick them. 

When we got to the place to camp, the tent was put up at once. Thundershowers were 
frequent with heavy rain. As soon as the tent was up, a ditch was dug around to take the water 
away from the tent if it rained. The beds were quickly made and that took a lot of quilts. There 
were no sleeping bags. Everything was put where it would be kept dry. I remember one storm 
that was real bad. It seemed the lightening was very close. After the storm it was a trial to wait 
for the grass to dry up so we could romp around. 1 remember how good the food tasted on the 
campfire. Maybe there were a few ashes, but we thought it was delicious. We had potatoes with 
bacon and eggs, pancakes, even candy some evenings. I wonder now how Mother ever managed 
to get enough for all of us. 

We went in the white-topped buggy. Mother generally drove that with the smaller 
children and the food in it. Father took the wagon without the box, just a few boards to hold the 
hay for the horses and the bedding. While we picked berries, he would load up a load of wood. 
Father also scouted around to find the best berries he could find for us. If the distance was far, 
we would ride the horses while some held onto their tails. We took a ten-gallon milk can for the 
berries. We kept it in the creek where it was nice and cool. Of course, we picked the berries over 
each night. It was a real fun time. 

One year Maude and I were left home with the boys to take care of the chores at home. 
We generally went on Monday and came home Saturday. It took some time to make the trip. The 
horses walked most of the time except when we went down the hills. When Saturday noon came, 
we began looking for the folks to return. We had cleaned the house real good, we thought. The 
afternoon was long. Finally just about dark here they came. They had found extra good berries. 
They filled all of the cans, buckets and boxes. Then they broke off the bushes. Mother even took 
off her big full petticoat and filled it with bushes. Soon the house didn't look like we had cleaned 
at all. The folks were tired but happy for the extra harvest of berries. 

The next day we went to Sunday School and Lyman invited Olin home for dinner. They 
didn't care about the mess in the kitchen. They had a good time anyway. Lyman and Olin were 
good friends. Both were full of fun and liked to goof off. Lyman had hair about the color of 
Eldoras. He also had a few freckles. It seemed to me that he was taller and more slender than 
Olin. 

I can remember a little bit about going to the fair when Lyman got his picture taken with 
his hat on. He was the only one that did. It was called a tintype and was not a very good picture. 
He would try anything once. 

I remember walking home from school when it was held in the old dance hall. It was 
right where Norman Erickson lives now. There were lots of boys going our way: Wilcox, 
Hacking, Byrne, Weekes, etc. It seemed there was a scrap every night to see who could get the 



134 



best of someone else. Lyman was always in the middle of it. I would cry because I thought 
Lyman would get hurt. Lyman and Leslie never scuffled at home. Leslie was never in on it on 
the way home either. 

Maude remembers that Lyman started in school in Rexburg. He stayed with Isabel and 
Emma Weekes. I don't remember if they were in school or working in the seed house. We used 
to raise lots of peas and they were sorted as they went over the rollers. Lyman soon came home. 
He said the girls burned everything and he couldn't eat it. He began taking the eighth grade over 
again. 

Nothing tasted good at home. 1 can remember him vomiting on the way home from 
school. One day a sharp pain hit him in the stomach. Mother called the doctor. Dr. Shupe was 
not our family doctor. It seems our doctor was away. Dr. Shupe was in Sugar City. He said it 
sounded like appendicitis and he should be brought in. He operated. In due time, Lyman came 
home but was in bed. Mother moved a bed into the front room right by the south window so he 
could see what was going on outside. Our horse stable was on the road and there was a large 
stack yard behind it. There was a large corral for the cattle and a stable for the milking. We 
always milked cows, separated the cream out and fed the milk to the calves and cows. 

This was in the fall of 1916. Lyman stayed in bed and never complained. But he had no 
appetite and kept getting weaker. I can remember mother laying the covers back so we could see 
the incision and see how he was swelling up in the abdomen. 

The folks decided they would take him to the temple in Logan. He was ordained an elder 
before his seventeenth birthday. That tells you the kind of boy he was. The Temple was closed 
for the holidays, so he never went. I doubt he could have stood the trip because he was so weak. 
He was administered to more than once but nothing seemed to help. They decided to take him to 
Idaho Falls. This was in the middle of winter. Maude said they put a cover on the sleigh box and 
put a bed and stove in it. They drove to the hospital. They opened him up and found he was full 
of infection. He had peritonitis or inflammation of the bowels. It was so wide spread they could 
do nothing about it. He soon passed away. Maude says Father and Mother came home on the 
train up to Byrne Siding. 

The folks were sick at heart. This was their second son to go in ten years. John Samuel 
died at three weeks of age. Father had planned for the boys to work with him on the farm. He had 
over 200 acres of land. This wasn't all, in less than two years, Leslie died in the army camp 
following surgery. He got the flu in that terrible epidemic. Ursel was the only son left. He was 
about ten years old. 

I remember very well the trip to the cemetery. The snow was nearly over the fence posts. 
There was a solid path worn by the horses' feet and one for the sleigh runners. If we had to pass 
anyone, we'd tip the sleigh box right off. Snowplows were not used in those days. 

One thing I remember about both Lyman and Leslie is that they would take me to any 
party or program I wanted to go to. I thought they were the best brothers ever. 

Lyman died January 12, 1917. Mother and Father were heartbroken. These were extra 
hard years for them. It didn't seem right for their boys to be taken. One of us girls wouldn't have 
been missed so much because there were more of us. I guess it would not have tried our parent's 
faith so much. They remained true to the faith. I know Mother helped Father a lot with the 
outside work. She worked so hard. Of course, we girls helped, but that was with the horses and 
machinery. I remember Mother driving a team in the field. She did help repair gates, fences, 
machinery and the chores. She was a good Mother and a wonderful helpmate. Mother was really 
broken in these trying years. 

By Bertha W. Jeppson (1977) 



135 



Family Group Record- 462 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Olin Henry JEPPSON-1298 


Bom 22Jun1898 


Place Briqham Citv, Box Elder, Utah, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 
Baptized 1 JuH90rT 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Died 1 Feb 1948_[ Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 


28 Jun 1921 


SLAKE 


Buned 5 Feb 1948 | Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 1 




Mamed 30 Aua 1923 ! P'ace Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah. USA 


SeaISp 


30 Auq 19231 SLAKE 




Husbands father Charles Olin JEPPSON-4507 




MRIN: 538 




Husbands mother Roxcv Lucina BLACKBURN-4508 


Wife 




Bom 28 Mar 1903 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple j 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


4AugJ911 






Died 29 Apr 1995 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


Endowed 


30 Auq 1923 


SLAKE 




Buned 6 Mav 1995 i Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's father John Sam 

wife's mother Ida Isabel 


uel WEEKES-25 




MRIN: 2 


| 


orlsabelle GROVER-1349 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


jm] 


Nilo Cornell JEPPSON-4509 




I 




Bom 1 Sep 1924 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Sep 1932 


i 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


14 Nov 1944 


LOGAN 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


1 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Veria Horman MOSS-4517 




MRIN: 2075 


Married 14 NOV 1944 I Place LOGAN 


SeaISp 


14 Nov 1944 I LOGAN 


F 


Marjorie Opal JEPPSON-4510 




Bom 2 Nov 1926 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


6 Jul 1935 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


12 Jul 1969 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 




spouse lrvinGOODLIFFE-4518 




MRIN: 2076 




Mamed 4 Jun 1948(D) i Place Archer, Madison. Idaho 


SeaISp 




F 


Julia JEPPSON-4511 




Bom 18 Jun 1929 Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Jul 19371 


Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


1 Jun 1951 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 






Spouse EllisATWOOD-4519 




MRIN: 2077 


Married 9 Jul 1956 i Place St . Marines. Benewah, Idaho 


SeaISp 


9 Jul 1957 I IFALL 


F 


babvJEPPSON-4512 




Bom 10 Aug 1932 

Chr. 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


Child 




Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died Stillborn 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place Archer, Madison. Idaho, USA 




Spouse 




Married I Place 


SeaISp 


i 


F 


ldaaeneJEPPSON-4513 


I 


Bom 8 Apr 1935 


Place Driqqs, Teton, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Jul 19431 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Jun 1958 


IFALL 


Died 1 Auq 2003 


Place Briqham Citv. Box Elder. Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 6 Auq 2003 i Place Briqham Citv. Box Elder. Utah 






spouse Glavde Delbert HONE-4520 




MRIN: 2078 


Married 19 Jan 1957 I Place Provo. Provo, Utah 


SeaISp 


17 Jun 19581 IFALL 




babvJEPPSON-4514 


r" 


Bom 20 Nov 1937 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


Child 




I 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Chikt 






Died Stillborn 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Archer, Madison. Idaho, USA 


I 


Spouse 


I 


Married | Place 


SeaISp 





136 









Family Group Record- 


462 






Page 2 of 2 


Husband Olin Henry JEPPSON-1298 










wife Bertha Rebecca WEEKES-1 1 58 










Children List each child in order of birth. 




LOS ordinance dates 


Temple ] 


7 


F !RoxcyJEPPSON-4515 






Bom 28Jun1940 I Place Archer, Madison, Idaho JJSA 




Baptized 


3 Jul 19481 








Chr. I Place 




Endowed 


2 Jun 1965 








Died ] Place 


SealPar 


BIC" 






Buried [ Place 




Spouse 




Mamed [ Place 


jSealSp 






8 


F 


Therba JEPPSON-4516 






Bom 22 Jun 1942 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


1 Jul 1950 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


8 Jun 1965 


IFALL 


! 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




! 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse . Arther Joseph PAUL-4521 








MRIN. 2079 ] 






Mamed 8 Jun 1965 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 




SeaISp 


8 Jun 1965 


IFALL i 



4 Mar 2006 



137 





Olin & Bertha Jeppson Family 
Top back: Nilo, Julia,Marjorie 
Middle: Olin, Idagene, Bertha 
Front: Roxcy, Therba 
Lower left: Bertha Jeppson 
Lower right back: Julia, Marjorie 
Idagene, Front: Therba, Roxcy 




138 



Bertha Weekes & Olin Jeppson Family 













s 


r ~ ~ %• 




1 


ipj& 


« *' ^I^Il^H 



Back: Marjorie, Nilo, ldagene 
Front: Julia, Roxcy, Therba 




Back: Roxcy, ldagene, Julia, Therba 
Front: Nilo, Bertha, Marjorie 



139 



BERTHA WEEKES JEPPSON 



"Like Nephi of old, I too, was born of goodly parents who had a testimony of the Gospel. 
My great grandparents left their homes in England and Scotland when they joined the Mormon 
Church. They went through much hardship in leaving their all and coming to Utah and then on to 
Idaho. My great grandfather, Thomas Grover, started out with the very first company, but 
because of his skill in building bridges, he was asked by Brigham Young to stop along the way 
and make bridges to make it easier for the rest of the pioneers. He stayed on at Casper, 
Wyoming, to run the ferry he built. My patriarchal blessing states that I was given the gift of 
faith in the heavens. I think that is a precious gift, one that I have always cherished. 

I was the fourth child in a family of eleven children. There were four boys and seven 
girls. My father is John Samuel Weekes, my mother Ida Isabel Grover. My brother Lyman, just 
older than I, died in January of 1917 after two operations. He was sixteen. My oldest brother, 
Leslie, the first born in our family, died in December of 1918. He was in the army and had 
appendicitis and then contracted that terrible flu that took so many lives. He died in the army 
camp. My older sister, Isabel, went on a mission in January of 1918 leaving me the oldest at 
home. The third son, John, was born in 1906 when I was three years old. He lived only three 
weeks. That left Ursel as the only living son. My sisters are Isabel, Maude, Opal, Eldora, Alta 
and Madonna We used to play games in the evenings like "Kick-the-Can", "Run Sheep Run", 
"Hide and Seek" and "Pomp". Often the neighbors joined in. About the only trips we took were 
when we went to the hills to pick huckleberries. Some of the older children were left at home to 
irrigate, do chores, etc. Father would put a small load of hay on the wagon without the box. Then 
came the tent with our bedding folded up inside of it, then food boxes were put on. Our berries 
were put in a ten-gallon milk can and placed in a safe place in the creek to keep them cool. We 
also took a pony to scout for berries. Mother generally drove the white topped buggy for the 
smaller children. It would take most all day to drive up, put up tents, make beds by cutting pine 
boughs for a mattress and spreading the quilts. No one had heard of sleeping bags at that time. 
The potatoes, bacon and eggs cooked over the fire always tasted delicious. Sometimes Mother 
even made and cooked hotcakes in the morning or candy at night. I enjoyed going huckleberry 
picking all her life until the last few years when she could not climb up and down the hills. 

When I was ten, I was allowed to take music lessons. How happy I was. I rode old Joe, 
our little black mustang pony, to get the lessons. How I loved to play and practice. Leslie would 
come in by the organ and hum and sing while I played. At times, everyone joined in. I would 
rather play the organ than eat, almost. I could never sing while I played, although Father kept 
telling me he wished I would. I could never understand why children didn't like to practice. I 
loved it, although I was slow and had a struggle getting the time and rhythm for a long time. 

Father had a large farm of 2 1 acres of irrigated land and 80 acres of dry farm. This was 
in the early 1 900's when everything was done with horses. Each morning before breakfast, they 
had to be fed, watered, brushed and harnessed, while someone else milked and took care of the 
cows. We also had pigs and sheep. You see there was a chore for each one to accomplish. Work 
still started in the field by 8:30 or 9:00. One row was plowed at a time. One row of beets 
cultivated at a time. I can remember when we got a "Gang Plow". It would plow two rows at a 
time. I used to ride on the horse and guide it between the rows of beets while Leslie walked and 
held the cultivator. Did we ever get tired. 



140 



The only contagious disease I can remember was the German measles. Oh how sick we 
were. Mother put papers over the windows in the dining room and placed our beds in there 
where it was warm. I wanted tomatoes. We didn't grow them or can them. If we got them, 
someone had to bring them to us. We were quarantined. No one could leave. 1 have never wanted 
any other food as much as I wanted tomatoes, but I never got them. Nothing else tasted a bit 
good. It seemed I was in bed for several days, always wanting tomatoes. I believe that my body 
was deficient in some way and that was why I craved tomatoes so much. 

When Father or the boys went up to our dry farm in Herbert to prepare the soil or harvest 
the crop, they would leave Monday morning and come back Saturday night. Sometimes Maude 
and I were taken along to prepare the food, wash the dishes and keep that one room house clean. 
We would pick serviceberries and choke cherries that grew all around the house. These were 
taken home for fruit. We also made lots of mud pies and cakes and decorated them with seeds 
and berries. It was always great fun. The wild roses there were the largest I have ever seen. The 
creek ran right by the house. 

When I was about fifteen, Maude and I had a more difficult time. Father rented the dry 
farm after the boys died and we were sent to haul our share of the grain home. We drove four 
horses hitched to the wagon with iron tires. Two horses were hitched to the wagon, the other 
team was out in front. Because of the hills it was quite an experience to know how to drive and 
handle the brake that put pressure on the back wheels. This would keep the wagon from going 
too fast, running into the horses and upsetting everything. There were so many difficult tasks that 
we learned early in life to rely on the power of prayer. Prayers were answered and we were kept 
from serious trouble. What a special blessing. 

After the boys died, I helped in the field a lot. I plowed, harrowed, cultivated, scraped to 
level the ground, mowed, raked and piled the hay. During the First World War, Father couldn't 
hire help, so I loaded and ran the Jackson fork to take the hay onto the stack. Sometimes I even 
stacked hay while Father handled the fork. One day I needed to get down from a high stack. 
Father told me to ride the fork and he'd let me down. As soon as it left the haystack and started to 
swing free, my courage left me. I had to get him to let me off and then climb down the ladder. In 
those days we piled hay by hand. When it was dry it was pitched on the wagon by hand. The one 
loading had to keep tramping around and put the piles in place, otherwise the load would slide 
off before we got to the stack. Then it had to be reloaded on the wagon. That was really a mess. 
A few loads lost like that and I learned to avoid it by making a good load the first time. It seemed 
like I worked outside more than inside during the summers until 1922 and 1923 when I attended 
summer school. I can't remember ever being kept out of school to work 

When we were kids we always milked eight or ten cows by hand. No one sold milk. We 
separated the cream from the milk, put the cream in ten-gallon cans and fed the milk to the 
calves and pigs. When the cream can got full, we hauled it to Rexburg where it was tested for 
butterfat and sold. The check was used in our shopping. Our cream was shipped out to be made 
into butter. Wheat was kept in the granary the year around to be taken to the mill where we got 
our flour. We sometimes made butter from the cream and sold the butter. A lot was learned by 
helping with chores inside and out. 

Father bought our first car when I was fifteen. It was an eight passenger car with two 
folding seats that fit down behind the front seat. They could be pulled up after the back seats 
were filled. I never did see another car with seats like that one. We didn't have driver training 
then, nor did we need a driver's license to drive. I'll never forget the first time I drove. We hadn't 
owned the car long before Father drove us to town. Then he came home some other way. He 
showed me how to shift gears and told me how to drive home. I was not excited, I was scared. 



141 



Never having driven before, it was a frightening experience. Mother was there. That gave me 
moral support, but she had never learned to drive so couldn't really help. We made it home and 
drove up to the big gate where Alta and Everett now live. The car didn't stop. It was down hill 
and the car kept on rolling slowly into the gate. The gateposts were decayed and down went the 
big wooden gate. We didn't run over the gate, the car stopped, but Father had a gate to reset 
when he got home later. That was the climax to my first driving experience. Since I was the 
oldest at home, I had to keep on driving. The Lord has blessed me and kept me from any serious 
accident. I am thankful for that. 

Because I was large for my age and there were no rules concerning age, I started school 
at age five. School was not hard for me. I made two grades in one year. In the seventh grade we 
had a poor teacher. I was promoted but the folks thought I should repeat the grade with a new 
teacher, so I did. The next year, we had a returned army man, Clarence Hillman. He thought the 
whole class should be held back and take the seventh grade over. We had no high school out 
here and no bus so we took it the third time. I had always gotten good grades and was promoted 
each year. 

My ninth grade was taken in Archer. The school trustees decided to give high school a 
try in Archer because we had such a big class graduate from the 8th grade. Most of the group 
started, but I was the only one who got my credits in the spring. The rest had dropped out and 
few ever went back for any high school. The next year Maude and I went to Ricks Academy, the 
only high school around at that time. We had to have the folks take us over on Sunday and come 
for us on Friday. Our apartment was an upstairs room with a little camp stove for heat and 
cooking. We also had the old reed organ so we could practice our music lessons. It was fun. 

I was able to get a job working in the library for two hours a day. The pay was $2 a day 
for the calendar month. No, that doesn't seem like much, but at that time, it helped a lot. I bought 
my own clothes, paid for the music lessons and had what I needed for school spending. I was 
nearly the oldest in the family. There were a lot of younger ones that had to be taken care of. I 
was thankful to be able to help out. 

My boy friend, Olin Jeppson, visited quite often with my older brother Lyman before 
Lyman died. I had no idea he was interested in me until one day when Maude and I were 
walking home from church. Olin just happened to be driving our way in a one horse buggy, 
although he lived in the other direction. I had on a narrow brimmed green velvet hat that he 
liked. He drove us home, which was a couple of miles. Maude and I often walked two and one 
half miles to church. I was only fourteen and not really interested in boys. My older brother 
Leslie had been good to take me any place I needed to go. So why think about boys with so 
many other things I wanted to do. Olin took me to meetings, which helped. Also, there were 
others along all the time so we were seldom alone. 

It was not a nice, easy courting period because Olin was anxious to be married. I was not, 
and told him so. We would break up for a while, then he would come back and we would try it 
again. I could have married when I was seventeen, but wanted to get my schooling, grow up, and 
be more prepared for marriage. Now I am older, I am very grateful I didn't marry when I was so 
young. 

When I was eighteen, Olin begged me to get married and go on a mission as husband and 
wife. This was done quite a bit with older couples. I still felt unprepared for marriage. I decided 
to get my patriarchal blessing and see if that would give me direction. It surely did. One 
paragraph said my mission in life was to be a devoted wife and mother. I was to let nothing keep 
me from getting married. The patriarch asked me if 1 knew what that meant. I said, "Yes, that is 
what I came here to find out." I hadn't said a word to him about it before the blessing. That made 



142 



me realize he was inspired. He couldn't know I was thinking about it except through inspiration. 
Now I told Olin I would finish school and be ready for marriage when he came home from his 
mission. 

1 think I would never have married if Olin hadn't been so persistent. I received my 
blessing when 1 was eighteen, and obeyed the counsel and have tried real hard to be a good wife, 
mother and grandmother. 

In 1916 girls didn't ever wear slacks or pant suits. I did have a riding dress that was long 
and made something like culottes today because I did so much riding. I did wear bib overalls 
when I worked outside and that was most of the summer. Olin was anxious to catch me in those 
overalls. I was embarrassed because none of his sisters had to help outside. One night he rode up 
on his bike, unannounced while we were eating supper. I felt terrible and wished I could have 
dropped through the floor. I couldn't. He saw me and enjoyed it. Then there was the time he 
pumped me home from church on the handlebars of the bike. Imagine, two and a half miles. It 
was a ride to remember. I can even remember that I had worn a white silk blouse with a ruffle 
around the neck. Fifty years hasn't let me forget that ride. I enjoyed it, but I'm not sure if Olin 
did. Anyway that was the only one I got. 

One time when Maude and I had taken the horses up to the hills to graze for the summer 
after the crops were in, we came home hot and tired. We had taken them up to Kelly Canyon, 
where we had been huckleberrying. It was a long horseback ride. Olin was working for Father 
that summer and was near the hydrant when we got home. He was going to turn the hose on us, 
but we ran. So did Olin. He caught me, picked me up in his arms, carried me to the trough, 
which was full of water and put me in it. I was screaming as loud as I could, but that didn't keep 
me from getting a good soaking. Was I ever mad. It didn't happen again. 

Our marriage on August 30, 1923 in the Salt Lake Temple was really quite an occasion 
for my family because 1 was the first child to be married. Our parents were certainly good to us 
or we would never have survived those first few years. Olin had only been home from his 
mission a couple of months, but he made arrangements to buy our place from my father. He had 
our house nearly built and a job teaching at Sunnydell School. We stayed with my parents for 
five weeks until the carpenters got our house finished 

When we moved in, the house was on a piece of unleveled ground in the middle of the 
field of stubble. We started from scratch. We are still living in the same house although we have 
done a lot of remodeling. It was a frame house. Now it is three times as large and covered with 
brick. We built on a couple of bedrooms when Idagene was a baby. We have been very 
comfortable in this home. 

Grandpa Weekes gave us a brindle cow. Grandpa Jeppson gave us a jersey cow and a 
horse and buggy. The jersey was not used to women so I couldn't milk it for a long time. I had 
helped with the chores at home a lot, but Grandma Jeppson had five boys and didn't need the 
girls to go to the barnyard. There was an old house on our place that we used for a stable. 

I had taught school one year before we were married and bought me a few clothes. I 
remember a brown coat I wore for twenty years after we were married. I liked it. I also bought a 
second-hand piano, dresser, sewing machine, six chairs as well as dishes, sheets, towels, etc. 
Showers were not given for brides. We had a big old cupboard that Grandpa Jeppa Jeppson had 
built. It is cut in two pieces now because after we put the back porch on we couldn't take the 
cupboard out in one piece. (This cupboard now belongs to Roxcy) They also gave us a bed and 
mattress. We had to buy a kitchen stove and that was about all. Although it is nearly fifty years 
ago, I can still remember our first front room curtains. I made little side curtains of a fine dark 
material that had balls on one edge. When measuring the material, I forgot to allow for hems. As 



143 



a result, the curtains didn't quite reach the windowsill. I enjoyed them anyway. We put 
kalsomine on the walls, that didn't cost much and was clean. It didn't wash as good as the latex 
paint we now use. We had linoleum on the kitchen floor. To make it last longer, I would get 
everyone into bed, then varnish the linoleum. 

The only heat was our wood or coal stove in the kitchen. As quick as the wood burned 
out, our fire was gone. Making the fire was the first thing to be done every morning. We always 
got in the chips and kindling the night before. If these were dry the fire was soon going strong. 
Getting in chips, wood and water were chores for the children. This way of getting heat is much 
different than flipping the switch like we do now to start the furnace. Our light was a coal oil 
lamp; carried from room to room. 

We have always had a garden. When we were first married Grandma Jeppson said, 
"Bertha, what are your children going to play with - tin cans in the backyard or flowers?" I have 
never forgotten that remark. We have always had flowers and our backyard was as free from 
weeds and litter as our front yard. I do love to watch the flowers grow and they have been so 
lush and beautiful. As quick as the yard was leveled we planted an orchard. 

When the children were growing up we had quite a patch of raspberries, currents and 
gooseberries. We sold these to help with finances. The raspberries were sold for $3 a case. We 
had the Cuthberts and Latham varieties. They were such fun to pick because they were so big 
and thick 

We dug a well when we were first married. We drew all the water for the stock and the 
house in buckets. This was not a pleasant task when the rope was covered with ice in the winter. 
We had to carry water to the house for drinking, bathing, washing clothes and cleaning. Still we 
kept our clothes and house clean. It wasn't easy. Electricity came to Archer in 1929 when Julia 
was a baby. About 1947, we drilled a well and made the pump cellar where it is now. Then we 
put in an electric pump. We did not have to draw the water, but we still had to carry it to the 
house. After Olin died, Father helped us put water and fixtures in the house. What a blessing that 
was to have all the water we needed without carrying it in a bucket. We also put in an electric 
water heater. We got an electric stove and refrigerator about 1950. Before this time, we had kept 
our milk, cream and butter in the fruit cellar. 

We got our first Maytag washer in 1930. I gave it to Marjorie when I began teaching and 
got another one. Then, when I broke my arm in 1967, I bought my automatic washer. I hardly 
know I am washing now. It is so easy and different. Just think, at first we drew the water, carried 
it in and; put it on the stove in a big boiler to heat. Then we lifted it again to put it into the tubs. 
When we finished, it all had to be carried outside and dumped. Is it any wonder we got tired? 
There was a lot more ironing because all the clothing needed to be ironed. I guess we can do 
about what we have to do. 

When we lost our two babies I had a little slow up in my work, so took Reed Organ 
lessons from Professor Billiter from Ricks College. He took fruit and vegetables from our garden 
as payment. I did learn a lot and enjoyed knowing the possibilities of the organ. I was ward 
organist then, so was able to use the skill I had learned. Later when I was in Tetonia, the year 
Olin taught there, I took piano lessons from Miss Wilmot the primary teacher. As I said before, I 
bought a piano before I was married. I had a hunger and thirst for music. I was a slow learner, 
but loved to practice. I taught all the girls to play until I started to teach. I should say I did try to 
teach Nilo, but he was not around the house very much. Children playing the piano has always 
been music to my ears. It was also fun to teach the girls to sing together. There were always 
opportunities for them to sing when people found they would and could prepare. 



144 



I made most of their clothes. I remember a few dresses in particular. When Marjorie 
graduated 1 made a pink taffeta one. Sister Briggs said that was the prettiest of all the dresses that 
year. When Roxcy and Therba were small I made each a pink taffeta with a full skirt and black 
velvet tie. Then I made Julia a pretty green crepe dress out of a dress grandma Jeppson gave me. 
Mother gave me soft yellow silk to make one for Idagene because she was her namesake. I liked 
the yellow one I made for Idagene. 

During our married life, our big push was to pay for our farm. Three thousand dollars 
isn't much now, but we really did have to struggle. We barely paid the mortgage off when Olin 
got sick He never did enjoy being free from debt. 

In 1 948 after Olin died, I was reading my Patriarchal Blessing again and one part took on 
new meaning. It stated that I was to have a useful career of teaching. I had taught in Sunday 
School and Relief Society from the time I was 14. Now, I decided I could return to school and 
teach in order to provide for our family. I registered at Ricks for the spring quarter in 1948 and 
went all summer. I rode back and forth with Elmo Cheney and later with Calvin Cook, my 
neighbors. My grief was buried under a terrific workload. The Lord blessed my efforts and I was 
able to begin teaching in September. Therba also started school then. I was not certified until 
1949. I graduated from two years at Ricks at a time when few older persons had gone back to 
school. When I talked with the president of the college, John Clark, he said, "Sister Jeppson, just 
take one step at a time." By taking some classes in winter and going to summer school, I was 
able to graduate in August 1957, six months after Idagene got her degree. 

The summer of 1957 I decided to go to summer school because I felt pretty good and 
Latreece Grover was going. We took turns driving. After we had been in school for a week, we 
had a special assembly and were told this would be the last year anyone could graduate with 
Ricks' requirements. Ricks was only a two year college and was under BYU. Latreece said, 
"Why don't you see if you can make it, Bertha?" I inquired what I needed - 23 additional hours. I 
had given special reports in the classes I was taking but had to register and enter new classes, 
late. There was a lot of make up work to do. I was allowed to take special exams in some 
homemaking classes, and special classes by correspondence. I petitioned and took extra classes 
at school. I studied night and day. Roxcy and Therba took over everything at home. Idagene was 
in summer school in Provo. By mid-August, I was ready to graduate. To me it was a miracle. 
One that took a lot of hard work, but the Lord helped me to be able to do it. Our graduation was 
held at BYU. How happy I was marching down the aisle. Idagene gave birth to the twins, Marva 
and Mike, that night. So it was exciting for many reasons. 

The Lord had made it possible for me to do it. I had decided I wouldn't try to graduate 
until Therba finished. Had I waited, I would have had to spend time on some other campus, 
causing a real hardship for all of us. The way it was, Therba (age 15) would say, "Mother, do 
you have to study today?" I would reply "Yes." She said "I'm sure getting tired of doing all the 
work around here." I reminded her of that, the year she finished college when she got tired of 
studying. I told her I was not tired of doing the housework, yard and garden. It wasn't easy for 
them either, but good practice. 

I am grateful to have spent 20 years in the schoolroom. It was a pleasant and rewarding 
experience. The time really flew by. There were so many new friends. Now I do appreciate 
having time to do what I want to do, things that had to be forgotten during my school years. I do 
appreciate being home and looking for my retirement check each month. 

I was so grateful that Julia, Idagene, Roxcy and Therba were willing to go to college and 
get their degrees in education while I taught. That made it more worthwhile for me. During the 
twenty years of teaching, I had three years of college, Julia three, Idagene four. Roxcy four and 



145 



Therba five. That meant nineteen years of college and five degrees. It was a lot of tuition to pay, 
but we always had what we needed by the girls helping. Then Julia and Roxcy filled missions. 
Surely the Lord was good to us. 

In 1981 Bertha gave Roxcy money to help her buy a home in Provo. This gave her a 
chance to spend the winters with Roxcy and enjoy her home in Sunnydell during the summers. 
She did this for several years. 

By August 1989, Bertha's health had deteriorated to the point she needed more care. 

Wilma Hatton was hired to help her during the day. Marjorie also spent a great deal of 
time helping her. This allowed her to continue living in her own home. 

By 1991 her health was such that she needed full-time care. In October, 1991, she went 
to Provo to live with Roxcy. She needed help, so three young women were hired to work on a 
rotating basis. This enabled Roxcy to keep on working at her job and with the help of Roxcy and 
these three young women she was given 24 hour care. This continued until she died on April 29, 
1995 in Roxcy's home. She is buried in the Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho. 

Bertha's Autobiography 



146 



Family Group Record- 2075 















Page 1 of 1 


Husband Nilo Cornell JEPPSON-4509 








Bom 1 Sep 1924 


piace Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


i 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


3 Sep 1932 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


14 Nov 1944 


LOGAN 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Married 14 NOV 1944 Place LOGAN 


SeaISp 


14 Nov 1944 


LOGAN 


Husbands father Olin Henry JEPPSON-1298 




MRIN: 462 






Husbands mother Bertha Rebecca WEEKES-1 1 58 






wife Verla Horman MOSS-4517 








Bom 14 May 1924 j Place lona L BonnevilleJdaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 






Chr 6 Jul 1924 (Place 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1932 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


14 Nov 1944 


LOGAN 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






wrfes father Joseph Crich MOSS-7263 




MRIN: 2080J 




wrfes mother Clara Lindholm HORMAN-7264 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


M j Lee Darwin JEPPSON-6943 






Bom 21 Jan 1947 


Place Idaho Falls Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


13 Feb 1955! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Mar 1966 1 IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICT 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Cathrine HENRIKSON-7066 




MRIN: 3532 


2 




Mamed 29 Feb 1972 Place Norfolk. Norfolk. Virainia 


SeaISp 




F Betty Jo JEPPSON-6944 




I 




Bom 14Auq1948 


Place Idaho Falls Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 May 1957 


I 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


19 May 1972 


IFALL 


Died 
Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Place 








spouse Jim EVANS-7067 




MRIN: 3533 




Married 19 Mav 1972 (D) I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


19 Mav 1972 I IFALL 


3 


M \ t 






Bom 23Jun1952 Place Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1960 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


16 Sep 1971 


SLAKE 




Died | Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried ' Place 






! 


spouse Kathleen M. MICKENS-7261 




MRIN: 3534 




Mamed 24 Mav 1974 (D) I Place Provo. Utah. Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Mav 1974TPROVO 




spouse Cheryl MOON-7262 




MRIN: 3535 


4 




Married 23 Oct 1981 I Place Salinas. Monterv. California 


SeaISp 


28 Sep 1982! OAKLA 


F Baby qirl JEPPSON- 


6946 




Bom 12 Mar 1956 


piace Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


Baptized 


Child! 


I 
I 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child ! 


Died Stillborn 


Place 


SealPar 


bic! 


I 


Buried 


Place 










Spouse 










Married | Place 


SeaISp 


i 


5 


F I 










Bom 13 Jan 1959 


piace Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Feb 1967 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried J_ Place 








spouse John Ray BURCH-7068 




MRIN 3536 







Married 27 Nov 1981 (D) i Place Farminaton. Davis. Utah 


SeaISp 


I 



Prepared by 
Phone 



jQarl Nykamp_ 
208-523-7378 



E-mail address^^ri@srv.myrf. nj et 
Date prepa red 4 MaL2006 _ 



Address 



1405AN65E 
Idaho Falls 
ldaho_ 
83401_ _USA „ 



147 



NILO C. & VERLA MOSS JEPPSON 

Nilo and Verla were married in the Logan Temple the 14 th of November 1944. Verla was 
teaching school in Arimo, Idaho and Nilo started working at the Naval Ordinance Plant in 
Pocatello. We moved to Pocatello and Nilo went to work at Eddie's Bread. They transferred 
him to Idaho Falls where Lee & Betty were born. After five years, Nilo left Eddie's to go to 
work for Clover Club Foods, a potato chip company. We moved back to Pocatello where Kim 
and Cindy were born. Verla has been a stay-at-home mom most of the time and we are so 
grateful for our children. We have 12 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. We have added 
three grandchildren by marriage (1 grandson & 2 granddaughters) and 7 great grandchildren. 

As Nilo progressed with Clover Club, we were transferred several times. We lived in 
Phoenix, Arizona for three years, Greeley, Colorado for 15 years, Denver, Colorado for three 
years and then were transferred to Utah in 1980. Clover Club gave us the opportunity to do 
some traveling. We were able to go to Hawaii, San Francisco, San Antonio, Acapulco, Spain, 
England and Germany. Conventions took us to several places in the United States. We were 
also able to go on a cruise to the Caribbean. It was a great time, but then retirement came along 
in 1986 after 26 years with the company. 

After retiring, we went on a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 
in May 1986 to November of 1987. We went all the way to Jackson, Wyoming! It was a great 
experience for us. After returning from our mission, Nilo again started serving in the Ogden and 
then the Bountiful Temples as an officiator. On November 24, 2004, we celebrated our 60 th 
wedding anniversary. 

Life has been so good to us. We've been able to survive Veda's three operations and her 
bout with cancer and chemo treatments in the last five years. As a result of the chemo, her sugar, 
diabetes and arthritis have given her a rough time. She still smiles and works through these 
health problems. In March of 2005, I (Nilo) was hit with an E-Coli infection and feel both 
blessed and lucky to have survived it. I remember going to bed Tuesday night and then waking 
up in the hospital Thursday afternoon. My body had gone into a septic shock and a mental coma. 
Thanks to the Lord's help and some new strong antibiotics I am still here. 

We are thankful to our Father in Heaven for our many blessings. We think of how much 
we owe our Savior Jesus Christ for what He has done for us. For his great atoning sacrifice, for 
the opportunity to return to our Heavenly Father some day. We know that Jesus Christ is our 
Lord and Master and is alive. We are grateful that our Father in Heaven knows each one of us, 
watches over us and answers our prayers. We are thankful for the testimonies we have that His 
church has been restored on the earth and that we are members of that church. 



Nilo & Verla Jeppson 



Back: Kim, Nilo, Lee Front: Betty Jo, Cindy, Verla 



148 






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149 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband irvun GOODLIFFE 




Bom 16 Dec 1913 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


4 Feb 1922 






Died 4 Oct 1964 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 




Endowed 


6 Jul 1966 


ARIZO 




Buried 8 Oct 1964 


Place Rexburq Cemetery, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Mamed 4 Jun 1948 (D) 


Place Archer, Madison. Idaho 


SeaISp 






Husbands father Henry Abon GOODLIFFE 








Husband's mother Anna Jane JOSEPHSON 


wife Marjorie Opal JEPPSON 





Bom 2 Nov 1926 I Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temr»i<> 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


6 Jul 1935 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


12 Aug 1969 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


wifes father Olin Henry JEPPSON 


wife's mother Bertha Rebecca WEEKES 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


| LDS ordinance dates ] Temple 


M Rulon GOODLIFFE 




Bom 28 Nov 1948 


Place St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


28 Dec 1956 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Donna Marie MAC ARTHUR 






Married 4 Jan 1982(D) Tpiace Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


| SeaISp 


I 


F ! Opal GOODLIFFE 


,.,., . 


Bom 10 Feb 1950 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Mar 1958 




Chr. I Place 




Endowed 


20 Nov 1970 


IFALL 


Died ! Place 




SealPar 




Buried [ Place 






spouse Dale FOWLER 






Married 20 Nov 1970 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


| SeaISp 


20 Nov 1970 I IFALL 


M ! Harold J. GOODLIFFE 




Bom 2Auq1951 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Sep 1959! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


8 Nov 1971 IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 






Buried 


Place 








spouse Colleen HARVEY 








Married 29 Apr 1977 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


IseaISp 


29 Apr 1977 I IFALL 


M 


Marvin Richard GOODLIFFE 




Bom 1 Sep 1952 j Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptrzed 


5 Nov 1960 




Chr j Place 


Endowed 


26 Feb 1976 


IFALL 


Died i Place 


SealPar 




Buried j Place 


Spouse Janet WEAVER 


Married 31 Auq 1973 I Place Eqin Bench, Fremont, Idaho 


I SeaISp 


26 Feb 1976! IFALL 


F i Anna Jean GOODLIFFE 




Bom 20 Sep 1953 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Nov 1961 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse 








Married i Place 


| SeaISp 


! 
I 


M 


Henry David GOODLIFFE 




Bom 27 Sep 1955 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Nov 1963 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 




SealPar 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse 


Married Place 


[ SeaISp 


I 


Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 


E-rrc 


>ii address cari@srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date 


prepared 3 Apr 2006 


83401 USA 



150 



MARJORIE OPAL JEPPSON GOODLIFFE 

Marjorie Opal Jeppson was born in Archer, Idaho to Olin Henry Jeppson and 
Bertha Rebecca Weekes. She was their second child and oldest daughter. Marjorie grew 
up on the family farm in Archer. Lacking electricity and other comforts, Marjorie 
learned many of the same skills her pioneer ancestors knew. She was taught the expertise 
needed for managing a home, but because she was very capable in working with the farm 
animals, considerable time was spent working outside and doing other farming chores. 
Gardening, raising vegetables, berries and fruits, and especially flowers were a delight to 
her. Great pleasure was derived from music and singing, and she learned to play the 
piano, the organ and the accordion. Family parties and ward socials were anticipated and 
relished. 

Marjorie attended school in Archer, Tetonia and Darby. Her last two years of 
high school as a junior and senior were in Rexburg, Idaho. After graduating, she moved 
to Rexburg and attended Ricks College. She graduated with a teaching certificate in 
education, and as a teacher was employed for two years by Madison County School 
District. 

During this time, Marjorie met the brother of a friend and co-worker. Irvun 
Goodliffe had been raised in Rexburg and was a returning veteran having served in the 
Army Air Corps in Europe during World War II. Marjorie and Irvun married, and during 
the next seven years, six children were born to this union. 

The family lived primarily in Rexburg in a house built before the war by Irvun 
and his brother, for their mother. Marjorie cared for her children and her ailing mother- 
in-law. She also grew a large vegetable garden and berries and fruits to help feed the 
growing family. She fed and milked the cow. 

Irvun worked as a carpenter, electrician, mechanic, trapper, sheep herder and all- 
around handyman. One winter, he built a full size boat in the family living room. 
Finances were always very tight. Marjorie and Irvun later divorced, but neither 
remarried. The problems and short comings that had separated them were worked on and 
several years later, while in the Rexburg hospital, Irvun passed away with Marjorie at his 
side. 

Marjorie was employed as an elementary teacher by Fremont County School 
District at Parker, Idaho. With much hard work, sacrifice and prayer, she also earned a 
bachelor degree in education from Idaho State University. All this was accomplished as 
well as performing the many responsibilities at home and in the yard and garden and 
raising her children and later, two grandchildren. Another hardship Marjorie overcame 
was when the Teton Dam failed and her home was destroyed. She served a mission in 
South Carolina for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. After teaching in the 
field of public education for twenty-nine years, Marjorie retired. 

Marjorie served faithfully in many church callings, singing in ward and stake 
choirs, serving as chorister, pianist or organist, and sports and camp director, as well as in 
a variety of leadership positions. She provided large floral arrangements from her garden 
for the weekly services and would give these bouquets and others to widows or other 
people to help brighten their lives. 

Marjorie continues to bless her neighbors, ward and family with her talents, love 
and compassion. Creating beautiful quilts and rugs from scraps of material and growing 



151 



spectacular flowers and tasty vegetables, she readily shares with family and friends. She 
enjoys going to the mountains to pick huckleberries and preserves them and other fruits 
and vegetables. Marjorie also continues the family tradition of arranging many bouquets 
each Memorial Day and placing them on the family graves. She serves monthly in the 
Idaho Falls Temple. She prepares and serves food for grieving families and helps with 
ward parties. Marjorie also provides transportation, driving those who need the help to 
appointments and gatherings. 

Marjorie has four sons and two daughters, twenty-two grandchildren and eleven 
great-grandchildren. 




Back: Julia Jeppson. Jean Hardy, Irvun &Marjorie Jeppson Goodliffe, 
Nilo Jeppson, Thora Birch, Lois Wheeler. Front: Roxcy &Therba Jeppson 



152 







Family Group Record- 2077 




Pagel of 2 


Husband Ellis ATWOOD-451 9 


I 

! 




[ Bom 2 Feb 1920 j Place Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah 


LOS ordinance dates 


Temple 


chr 7 Mar 1920 I Place Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


4 Aug 1928 




o.ed 10 Apr 1977 
Buried 13 Apr 1977 


Place Blackfoot, Bingham, Idahoj 


Endowed 
SealPar 


9Jul1957pFALLr i 
BIC 


Place Thomas Riverside Cemetery. Binqham. Idaho 


Mamed 9 Jul 1956 I Place St . Marines. Benewah. Idaho 


SeaISp 


9 Jul 1957 ' IFALL 




Husbands father Ivan James ATWOOD-7050 




MRIN: 2081 


__— 


Husband's mother Lenora Boyd -7051 






wife Julia JEPPSON-4511 




Bom 18 Jun 1929 Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1937 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


1 Jun 1951 


IFALL 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




wife's father Olin Henry JEPPSON-1 298 




MRIN: 462 J 




wifes mother Bertha Rebecca WEEKES-1 1 58 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


David Olin ATWOOD-5450 




Bom 30Mav1957 


Place Blackfoot, Binqham, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Jun 1965 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


23 Jun 1977 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


9 Jul 1957 


IFALL 


|_l 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Renee DAHL-7052 




MRIN: 2611 


Mamed 27 Jun 1980 : Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


27 Jun 1980! IFALL 


M j Jay Dee ATWOOD-4732 




Bom 12 May 1958 | Place Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Jun 1966! 


Chr. j Place 


Endowed 


14 Jul 1977 IFALL 


Died Place 


SealPar 


BICi 


Buried | Place 






spouse Julia NIEDERHOUSER-7053 




MRIN: 2149 ! 




Mamed 16 Nov 1979 ! Place Looan Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


16 Nov 1979! LOGAN ! 


M 


Don James ATWOOD-6173 




Bom 27 Mar 1960 


Place Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 May 1968 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


25 Oct 1979 


IFALL 




Died | Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried ! Place 








Spouse Kelli FACKRELL-7054 




MRIN: 3088 j 


i | 


Mamed 10 Auq 1984 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


10 Auo 1984 [ IFALL i 


M 


Stevan Lavon ATWOOD-5451 




Bom 16 Auq 1961 


Place Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Sep 1969! 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


■ BIC 




Buried 


Place 








Spouse Lee Anne HALL-7055 




MRIN: 2612 




Married 3 Dec 1982 ! Place Pinqree. Binqham, Idaho 


SeaISp 


! ! 


F 




Bom 4 Auq 1962 


Place Blackfoot, Binqham, Idaho 


Baptized 


Child. 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child] 




Died 5 Auq 1962 


Place Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 


SealPar 


BICi 




Buried 


Place Thomas Riverside Cemetery, Binqham. Idaho 








Spouse 








Married Place 


SeaISp 


| 


F DebraATWOOD-6174 




Bom 25 Aug 1963 


Place Blackfoot, Binqham, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Sep 1971 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse 






Married [ Place 


SeaISp 


i 


F 


Sallv ATWOOD-7049 




Bom 3 Jul 1965 


Place Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Aug 1973 I 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Jun 1993 J BOISE 1 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICj 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse 






L_ 


Mamed Place 


SeaISp 


I 



22 Mar 2006 



153 




Ellis & Julia Atwood Family 
Back: David, Debra, Jay, Stevan, Don 
Front: Sally, Ellis, Julia 








Ellis & Julia Atwood Family 
Back: Debra. Sally 
Front: David, Julia, Stevan 




154 




Jay Dee Atwood and Julie Atwood Family 

Back: Jay Dee Atwood, Jerry Collingwood, Taylor Atwood. Ellis Jay Atwood. Middle: Julie Atwood. Michal Ann 
Collingwood. Christy Holt Atwood, Jonathan Holt, Front: Paul Atwood, Claire and Darren Collingwood 




David and Ranae Atwood Family 

Back: Angela & Lynn Mendenhall, Charly & Lorcn Atwood Middle: David, Ranae & Timothy Atwood. Front: Joel, 
Daniel & Rebecca Atwood. Reed & Melissa Atwood not pictured, both arc serving missions. 



155 





Stevan & LeeAnn Atwood Family 
Left: Stevan & LeeAnn Right Back: Heather,Nicholas 
Middle: Stevan, Emilee Front: Lee Ann 




The Don and Kelly Atwood Family 
Spencer, Don, Logan, Kelli, Storm 



156 



JUILA & ELLIS LA VON ATWOOD 

Julia Jeppson Atwood was born June 18, 1929 to Olin & Bertha Weekes Jeppson, in 
Rexburg, Idaho. The family lived on a farm near the Snake River. Julia attended school in 
Archer and then graduated from Ricks College with a teaching degree. She taught briefly in 
Ririe and then in Rigby before moving to Northern Idaho to teach elementary school. While 
Julia was teaching at Glenn's Ferry, Ellis's sister introduced Julia to Ellis. 

Ellis took me to visit his landlord and family in St Maries, Idaho. We were married July 
9, 1956 by the St. Maries, branch president. He took me to his home in Pingree, ID. 

Ellis made his living farming and enjoyed filling church assignments, temple work, fly- 
fishing, hunting, gardening and his family. I enjoyed raising and caring for my family, filling 
church assignments, playing my accordion, piano or organ, making and tying quilts. I enjoy my 
flowers and the vegetable garden. I also enjoy crocheting, embroidering - especially pillowcases, 
making braided rugs, reading and studying scriptures, doing temple work, and especially being 
with my family. 

On our first wedding anniversary we were sealed in the Idaho Falls Temple. David was 6 
weeks old and sealed to us on July 9, 1957 now we were a family for time and all eternity. We 
were blessed with 4 boys and 3 girls. 

I will turn 76 years old June 18, 2005. I have been a widow for 28 years. I have 
substitute taught, worked on a potato combine, cut seed potatoes and whatever odd jobs I could 
find to make money since Ellis' death on June 1 1983. I was asked to be a custodian for the 
Pingree Ward. I worked for the LDS Church, cleaning church buildings, for 16 years, until June 
18, 1999. I cleaned the Pingree building alone for 6 years, then with other custodians of the 
West Stake for about 5 years. Then we joined the rest of the Blackfoot stakes to help clean 20 
buildings. All the custodians were divided so Vi worked in 10 buildings and the 14 did the 
remaining 10. We met often with our supervisor for help and instruction. I enjoyed it most of 
the time, except for those building with many stairs where we had to drag our vacuums. I retired 
at age 70. 

Now I enjoy being able to slow down and not drive to work every day, especially when 
the roads are bad. I try to accomplish something worthwhile every day and keep in touch with 
my family through phone calls, e-mail, letters and visits. Going to the temple, reading and 
studying the scriptures each day adds much enjoyment. 

David, Jay and Don served missions: David went to Cali, Columbia, June 30 1977-79, 
Jay went to Tokyo, Japan, July 28, 1977-79, Don went to Bogota, Columbia, November 1 1979- 
81 . All six of our children went to college. Some longer than others. 

David and Don took turns managing the farm when they could. The rest helped in the 
evenings as much as possible until we had to declare bankruptcy. A year later the FHA asked if 
someone would like to buy the farm back. Stevan was the only one close enough and decided to 
try it. After Ellis' death, it's has been a struggle for all of us to keep the farm and make a go of it, 
but I'm thankful they've all helped and it is still in our Atwood family. Stevan worked for a 
neighboring farmer and rented our farm out. He also sold parcels of land to pay the FHA loan. 
Now he lives at his home here in Pingree, rents his farm and works at the flour mill in Blackfoot, 
ID, delivering grain to Pocatello. It is still a struggle to keep farming now-a-days. 

David Olin (born May 30, 1957) studied accounting, graduated from Ricks and attended 
ISU for 1 year. He moved to Homedale, and Caldwell, ID, and worked at various jobs on a dairy 
farm, an orchard, and helped a retiree build a rock fence. He began at the US Post Office in 
Boise then transferred to Emmett, ID, where he owns a home on the South Slope. He has the 
longest walking route of the Emmett Post Office. He and Renee Dahl have 4 girls and 5 boys. 



157 



The oldest daughter, Melissa is currently serving in the Colorado Denver North mission and the 
oldest son, Reed, in the California, Roseville mission. The 2nd daughter, Angela and her 
husband Lynn Mendanhall are teaching English to children in China until June '05. Charlyn is at 
BYU Idaho. Which leaves Timothy, Loren, Daniel and Joel at home preparing for missions, and 
Becky looking forward to becoming 8 years old. 

Jay Dee (bom May 12, 1958) attended college in Logan, Utah and Ames, Iowa. 
He is an Economist for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, adjunct professor in 
Texas A&M University in Temple, Texas. He is bishop of the Temple Ward. He and Julie 
Neiderhouser have 2 girls and 3 sons. Their daughter, Michael Ann and her husband Jerry 
Collingwood have a son and daughter and live close by in Hewitt, Texas. Their daughter, Christy 
and her husband Jonathan Holt are in Maplewood, Maine, attending law school. Taylor and Ellis 
are at home preparing for missions next year and Paul is enjoying being 12 years old. 

Don James (born March 27, 1960) became a registered nurse and is living in Chubbuck, 
Idaho, and enjoys working in the Pocatello Hospital by the University. He and Kelli Fackerell 
have 2 sons and a daughter. Their son, Logan is attending ISU and is preparing for a mission 
this summer, Spencer and Storm are at home. 

Stevan Lavon (born Aug 16, 1961) and Lee Ann Hall have 1 son and 2 daughters. 
Nicholas is nearing the end of his mission in Bolivia Cochabamba, and Heather is in the US 
Army stationed at Tripler, Hawaii working in the hospital. Emilee is keeping Mom and Dad 
company at Pingree, Idaho. Renae (born Aug 4, 1962 - died Aug 5, 1962). 

Debra (born Aug 25, 1963) is a Practical Nurse. She likes to work directly with the 
elderly in Caldwell, Idaho. She enjoys being an aunt to all the family and is kept busy thinking 
up fun activities for all of them. She loves crafts. 

Sally (born July 3,1965) teaches elementary school in Nampa, Idaho, where she shares a 
home with Debra. She enjoys fulfilling church assignments and helping Debra with family fun 
and activities. She, too, enjoys being aunt and sharing the fun of teaching all of them. 

My family is growing older, they are busy working, and are happy scattered all over the 
world. It is hard to get everyone home to Pingree, Idaho, at the same time. It is fun and enjoyable 
to keep in touch through letters, telephone calls, cell phones, e-mails. (I even e-mail) and short 
visits. We get together when and wherever we can manage. We have surely been blessed. I am 
thankful for the help from our Savior, Jesus Christ, Heavenly Father, the Holy Ghost, friends and 
family, and being a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- Day-Saints and to have the 
blessings of the priesthood, prayer and scriptures in our home. 



158 









Family Group Record 






Page 1 of 2 


Husbc 








Bom 12 Oct 1931 i Place Payson^ Utah, Utah 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


28 Jan 1940 








Died 


Place 


Endowed 


17Jun1958 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


22 Apr 1961 MANTI 






Mamed 19 Jan 1957 


Place Provo. Provo, Utah 


SeaISp 


17Jun1958 IFALL 




other spouse Joyce LaVon Evans NIELSEN 






Mamed 25 Feb 2006 ! Place Brigham Citv. Box Elder. Utah 


SeaISp 








Husband's father Glendore HONE 






Husband-s mother Minnie Matilda HORROCKS 








wife Idagene JEPPSON 






Bom 8 Apr 1935 


Place Driggs, Teton, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 






Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1943 








Died 1 Aug. 2003 


Place Brigham Citv, Box Elder. Utah 


Endowed 


17Jun1958 


IFALL 




Buried 6 Auq 2003 


Place Brigham Citv. Box Elder. Utah 


SealPar 


BIC! 




wrfes father Olin Henry JEPPSON 


1 




wife's mother Bertha Rebecca WEEKES 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


F 


Marva HONE 




Bom 17 Aug 1957 Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


4 Sep 1965 j 


j 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Dec 1977 i OGDENT 


I 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


17 Jun 19581 IFALL 


I 


Buried i Place 


I 


Spouse Kevin Ivan WOODFRUFF 






Mamed 16 Dec 1977 ! Place Ogden. Weber. Utah 


SeaISp 


16 Dec 1977; OGDEN 


2 


M 


Michael HONE 




I 






Bom 17 Aug 1957 


Place Provo. Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


4 Sep 1965! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


30 Sep 19761 OGDEN 1 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


17 Jan 1958] IFALL 




Buried 


Place 






spouse Melodie Rae GLUM 








Married 17 Apr 1980 I Place Logan. Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


17 Apr 1980! LOGAN 


3 


F Rebecca Ann HONE 






Bom 16 Mar 1959 


Place Provo. Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1967] 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


14 Sep 1979 


MANTI 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






spouse Paul Dean COX 


4 




Married 14 Sep 1979 I Place Manti. Sanpete. Utah 


SeaISp 


14 Sep 1979 I MANTI : 


M i Mathew Glen HONE 








Bom 4Jun1961 


Place Provo. Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1969 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 May 1980 


LOGAN J 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






Spouse Jeannine Adelle HANSEN 








Married 5 Jan 1984 ! Place Logan. Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


5 Jan 19841 LOGAN 


5 


M Doyle Glayde HONE 






Bom 26 Mar 1965 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


31 Mar 1973! 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Jan 1984 j LOGAN 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICL 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Codv KARLINSEY 








Married 18 Dec 1986 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


18 Dec 1986] SLAKE 


6 


u£_ 


Chariene HONE 




Bom 23 Aug 1967 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1975] 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


20 Mar 1987 I JRIVE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 






spouse Darin Robert JENSEN 








Married 21 Mar 1987 ID) i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


21 Mar 1987 SLAKE 


7 


F 


Jennifer HONE 






Bom 27Mav1972 


Place Brigham City. Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 


31 May 1980 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


22 Aug 1992 j OGDEN 




Died 


i Place 


SealPar 


BICi 




juried 


DImm 










Spouse Vernon K. BRODERICK 




I 




Married 28 Aug 1992~[ Place Manti. Sanpete, Utah 


SeaISp 


28 Aug 1992 MANTI 



159 




Glayde & Idagene Hone Family 1975 
Back: Matthew, Becky, Glayde, Idagene, Michael, Marva 
Front: Jennifer, Doyle, Charlene 




Glayde & Idagene Hone Family 1999 
Back: Doyle, Matthew, Charlene Middle: Becky, Michael, 
Jennifer, Marva Front: Glayde, Idagene 



160 



Idagene Jeppson & Glayde Hone Family 

A beautiful and beloved daughter of our Heavenly Father chose to live her earthly 
life with Olin Henry Jeppson and Bertha Rebecca Weekes. Idagene was born in Driggs, 
Idaho on April 8. 1935. Her father was teaching in Tetonia and then moved the family to 
Archer, where he became a farmer. 

Idagene went from first through eighth grade at the Archer school. She had to 
walk a mile to school and had to pass by Ashbacker's place where they had a dog that 
scared her to death. The dog would only bark if none of the kids were around, but if one 
of the boys was home they'd send it out on the road. One day she gave the teacher a 
good excuse for leaving early and was able to get past the dog before the boys got home 
to let it loose. When she arrived home she hid outside by the porch until it was time to be 
home. The teacher must have talked with her parents and after that she didn't have a hard 
time getting past the dog. 

Idagene, Ada Lou Sutton and Sheila Erickson were like the three musketeers 
growing up. They were always together doing school work, playing and singing. Music 
was a big part of Idagene's life. Her parents directed and played for the ward choir, 
which would practice at their house. She was taught at an early age to love the hymns 
and to understand that there is a message in every hymn. 

Idagene* s father died when she was only thirteen. She never forgot the last time 
she saw him alive. She has often wondered if he knew that when he stood in the doorway 
watching his family that that would be the last time he would be there. 

Idagene went to Madison High in Rexburg, Idaho and enjoyed acting in plays and 
singing in the choirs. She was very talented in music and acting. She participated in 
many of the school plays and choirs. She also loved to play baseball, volleyball, and 
basketball. In fact I think that if soccer had been an American sport she would have 
played it too. Upon graduating from Madison High she went to Ricks College. She went 
on to Brigham Young University where she graduated in Elementary Education. 

One of Idagene's roommates, Lucinda Payne, invited Alma Swan over for dinner 
and he brought along Glayde Hone, who was a friend of his from the service. Glayde 
was working in Las Vegas at the time and came up and met Idagene a few times, before 
they started dating. They were engaged November 12, 1956 and were married January 
19, 1957 in Provo, Utah. Idagene graduated from BYU in May of 1957. August 17 th of 
that same year Idagene gave birth to a set of twins (Marva & Michael). They were living 
in Provo while Glayde was going to school, when they got word that Bertha had had a 
heart attack. They went to Challis, Idaho so that Idagene could finish teaching school in 
Bertha's place. Once Bertha could go back to teaching, they headed back to Provo so 
Glayde could finish school. March 16, 1959 they had a daughter (Becky). Glayde 
graduated June 4, 1961, which is the same day that they had another son (Matthew). 
Glayde started work at Sperry Rand in Salt Lake City, Utah at the end of winter quarter 
before he had graduated from BYU. They bought a home in Orem, Utah and lived there 
for quite awhile. Doyle came the 26 th of March 1965 and Charlene was born August 23, 
1967. Glayde went to work for Thiokol and the family moved to Brigham City, Utah for 
a short time. March 28, 1972 Glayde called and asked if Idagene wanted to move to 
Alaska. Before they moved to Alaska, Jennifer was born on May 27, 1972. They stayed 
in Alaska for three years before moving back to Brigham City, Utah. 



161 



Idagene and Glayde have traveled to many places and have taken their children to 
see many places. Traveling, fishing and gardening were a few of the things that they 
enjoyed doing. Idagene loved to sew and create beautiful quilts and dresses and other 
clothing for her children and others. She crocheted many blankets for her children and 
grandchildren as well as dolls. Idagene served in many callings and did more than one 
calling at a time. She was the ward organist in every ward that we ever lived in. She 
served as primary, mutual and Sunday school teacher as well as Primary and Relief 
Society president in many wards. She served as a visiting teacher until the end of her 
life. In fact she went visiting teaching in July of 2003 the month before she passed away. 

September 1 999, Idagene found out that she had cancer and there was nothing that 
the doctors could do. She found the help and the courage to continue on and do a few 
more things with her husband, children and grandchildren. She often said that there are 
healing powers from service in the Temple. She and Glayde have been temple workers in 
the Ogden Temple for many years, another thing that they enjoyed very much. When 
Jeanette Cox went on her mission, Idagene told her that she would see her again when 
she got off of her mission. Tyler Cox left six months later and she told him goodbye and 
that this would be the last time that she would see him. She knew that she didn't have 
much time. On August 1, 2003, after a valiant battle with cancer, this beautiful and 
beloved daughter returned to her Heavenly Father. She was buried in the Brigham City 
Cemetery on August 6, 2003. 

Marva married Kevin Woodruff in the Ogden Temple and they have five children 
(3 boys and 2 girls). They also have 8 grandchildren. They are currently living in Lehi, 
Utah. 

Michael married Melodie Glum in the Logan Temple and they have three children 
(2 girls and 1 boy). They currently live in Britton, South Dakota. 

Matt married Jeannine Hansen in the Logan Temple and they have five children 
(4 boys and 1 girl). They currently live in Pleasant View, Utah. 

Doyle married Cody Karlinsey in the Salt Lake Temple and they have four 
children (3 girls and 1 boy). They currently live in Aurora, Colorado. 

Charlene married Darin Jensen in the Salt Lake Temple and they have three 
children (1 boy and 2 girls). Charlene and her children currently live in Boise, Idaho. 

Jennifer married Vernon Broderick in the Manti Temple and they have four 
children (3 boys and 1 girl). They currently live in Gunnison, Utah. 



162 



ROXCY JEPPSON 




Lucky enough to be born at home in Archer, Idaho, 
I grew and learned there until my junior year of high school 
when Mother moved Therba and I to Challis, Idaho so she 
could teach there. 

I loved living on a farm with all the animals - 
except the chickens. Idagene and I shared a dislike for their 
flighty ways. I would pound on the wall behind their nest to 
get them to fly out of the coop before I'd go in to gather the 
eggs. To this day I love the soft baby faces of new born 
calves. I didn't know but what we enjoyed all the riches of 
the world. We had chores to do, but if we got them done, 
there was plenty of time for play. Therba and I could drag 
Sunday dishes out for 3 hours by playing word and number 
games. We loved to sit on the kitchen floor and roll balls 
between us. The wood stove kept the kitchen warm in 
winter and when we finally had the luxury of water in the 
bathroom, we could open the kitchen door into the hall, 
close the bedroom doors and have a bit of heat in the bathroom. I don't remember ever using the 
coal oil lamps except when the electricity went out, but I remember family members hauling lots 
of water especially on wash day. I also remember mopping lots of water when I spilled the 
bucket trying to balance on a chair to get a drink. 

I loved our home and the lessons learned there at my mother's feet. She helped us prepare 
for talks in Junior Sunday School, which began church wide about the time I was 5 or 6. I did not 
like having to climb up those narrow stairs of the old rock church house to the attic or having to 
go past the dark closet doors where I had been told the Holy Ghost lived. I'd wait till Therba or 
another child was ready to go up to protect me. But the songs we learned there and in Primary 
made the scary part seem not so bad. Later our Primary class (Primary was held on Wednesday 
afternoon) was assigned the furnace room. It was almost as scary as the attic. 

Thanks to Mother's teaching, I've always had a strong testimony of the Gospel and knew 
that our Heavenly Father loves us and prepared this great earth so we could learn and return to 
Him. Although my father died just before I turned 8, I've always known the value of the 
priesthood in my life because Mother's only living brother. Uncle Ursel, moved into the spare 
bedroom off the porch that fall and lived with us till about 6 years before he died. We knew we 
could call on him for blessings and help and often did. What a blessing the priesthood has been 
in my life. Home Teachers have also been a great source of strength and help. 

I graduated with a class of 24 students from Challis High School. Therba met her future 
husband there, Arthur Paul. We enjoyed double dating my junior year. Then Art left for college. 
Challis was a great experience. Very few families were active but we thoroughly enjoyed our 
association with these good people. When I went to my 30th HS Reunion, I was amazed at how 
many had been bishops, missionaries, on High Councils, etc. Now Challi has a nice new modern 
chapel, but we loved the little log church with one classroom in the furnace room. Mother was 
organist on their old pump organ and I got to fill in for her some times. We also cooked breakfast 
for the students who came from outlying areas and stayed in the dorm. They only asked us to 
make coffee once, they made it themselves after that. 

Ricks had no appeal to me, nor did BYU. I chose ISC in Pocatello. I firmly believe I 
would have drifted from the church had I not made this choice and still had to defend my 



163 



testimony every day. Three winters and three summers gave me a BS degree in Elementary 
Education in August 1961. I taught 2nd grade the first year in Ammon, Idaho. It was a new 
building in the same town my father was teaching when he passed away in 1948. Living at home 
gave me the opportunity to enjoy good cooking once again. Then I returned to Pocatello and 
taught 3 r grade for 3 years at Tyhee. We had a few of the Indian children whom I really enjoyed. 

Therba came to ISC and we enjoyed rooming together while I taught school at Tyhee 
Elementary School. 1965 found her marrying Art, and me entering the mission field. I had 
always said I was going to get married or do something exciting for my 25th birthday and that's 
just what I did. I entered the Salt Lake City mission home in preparation to serve in the Florida 
Mission. I rode my first train to Chicago, then my first commercial plane to Orlando, Florida. 
The only sister in the train car full of elders, it was a new experience to sleep in the seat with the 
sad, lonesome Elders crying themselves to sleep on each shoulder. 

There were too many teachers wanting jobs when I got home in 1967, so I went to BYU 
to re-certify in modern math. My part time student job turned full time at the Admissions office 
and lasted for 5 years. Trying to find a teaching position, I enjoyed substituting for 5 years, when 
my room mate, Jan Myers, asked if I'd like to work at Snelson's Photocolor Lab with her. I 
worked there for nearly 23 years, retiring in 1962. I processed the film in total darkness. 

We enjoyed the BYU singles ward for 14 years, then realized we were older than their 
parents. Much searching found an ideal home close to the campus and with an interest rate we 
could manage. Mother helped with the down payment with the agreement she would spend the 
winters with us. We have really enjoyed our home and the ward. 

Mother spent 4 months each winter, then 5 or 6 until it became necessary for 24 hour 
care. We were so blessed to find wonderful girls to help so I could continue working. The "Girls" 
became good friends. The 2 main ones were from Mexico and taught us so many things. They 
were very patient and we soon learned Saints are great wherever they come from. "Zion" Saints 
have much to learn from other cultures. 

My brother and sisters have included me as one of theirs and I've been richly blessed 
with an extended family - have missed few marriages, blessings, farewells and homecomings, 
baptisms, birthdays or other important days. I claim them all as my own. 

I met Jan Myers on my mission and we began rooming together in Provo along with 2 
other sisters from our mission. Anita and Donna married, and after a number of young student 
roommates, we decided we could manage without roommates to help foot the bills. We have 
roomed together ever since and have appreciated the companionship and growth gained by 
sharing. Marriage would have been nice, but it seems our Father's plans for us have not included 
husbands. But, we have enjoyed the rich blessings He has seen fit to give us. 

"Mary, Behold Thy Son" was published in 1991 by Covenant Pub. Co. What a thrill to 
walk into book stores and find my work featured. It was the first fiction allowed in the LDS 
market about the Savior and His family. Now there are many such works. I really enjoyed 
researching and writing it. 

Serving in the church has always been a blessing. We have so many friends all over the 
world due to being in the BYU wards and the students in our home ward. We were called to 
serve in the Provo Temple and started our service Valentine's Day 1 99 1 . What a strength it has 
been for us. We continue serving and enjoying it, as well as service in the Ward. I am currently 
the Relief Society President and am learning much. 

As I said, my testimony has always been a part of me. How do people manage without 
the guidance of the Gospel. I couldn't. It is my guiding influence and strength. How grateful I am 
for my pioneer heritage. 



164 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband Arthur Joseph PAUL 




Bom 20Auq1937 


Place Challis, Custer, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr 


Place 


Baptized Abt1945 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 8 Jun 1965 


IFALL 




Buried i Place 


SealPar 






Married 8 Jun 1965 ! Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


seaisp 8 Jun 1965 


IFALL 




Husband's father Paul John BUROUGHS 




Husband-smother Marqaret Jean SPEER 




Wife 




Bom 22 Jun 1942 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 1 Jul 1950 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 8 Jun 1965 IFALL 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar BIC 


i 


wife's father Olin Henry JEPPSON 


i 


wife's mother Bertha Rebecca WEEKES 





Cart Nykamp 
208-523-7378 



Prepared by 
Phone 

E-maii address cart @srv.m yrf.net 

Date prep ared 1 Apr 2006 



Address 



14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls 
Idaho 



83401 USA 



165 



THERBA JEPPSON & ART PAUL 

Therba was born in Archer, Idaho on January 22, 1942 to Bertha Weekes Jeppson and 
Olin Jeppson. She is the youngest child in a family of 5 girls and 1 boy, which includes Nilo, 
Marjorie, Julia, Idagene, Roxcy, & Therba. 

They lived on a farm near the Snake River, where Bertha's grandparents homesteaded. 
They raised grain, hay and potatoes. They always had a large garden, big orchard and beautiful 
flower gardens. On Memorial Day, the family would pick dozens of flowers, arrange them in 
bouquets, put them in the back of the pickup and drive slowly to the Archer Sutton Cemetery and 
put them on the graves. 

They had a small dairy herd, everyone had to help with the milking, feeding and care of 
the cows and calves. 

When Therba was 5 years old her father passed away in his sleep. This was such a 
hardship on the family. The family worked hard and made do with what they produced. 

Therba "s mother. Bertha got her teaching degree. She taught in Archer for many years 
and then moved to Challis, with Roxcy and Therba, where she had taken a teaching position. 
The girls were in high school and soon had steady boy friends. This is when Art Paul entered the 
picture. Therba went to college at ISU, Utah State and Ricks College. lone Clark was a midwife 
at Art's birth and has watched out for him all his life. Art attended high school in Challis and 
went to Idaho State University in Pocatello and then continued his education in Colorado. They 
were married in June of 1965. They moved to Colorado for 12 years and taught school there. In 
1977 they moved to Archer and then to Rexburg. 

They both teach at Bonneville Jr. High near Idaho Falls. Art teaches shop. He has taught 
hundreds of students how to work with wood. Therba teaches language arts. They are both 
excellent teachers, but all good things must come to an end as they look forward to retiring in the 
near future. 

Art has his own lathe and enjoys making bowls, picture frames etc. Together they enjoy 
flowers, gardening and serving in many church callings. They work in their yard and raise prize 
winning iris that are breathtakingly beautiful. They share these with their friends, family and 
neighbors. They enjoy many varieties of flowers and vegetables and have a beautiful yard. 





Therba 



Art 



166 









Family Group Record- 463 






Page 1 of 1 


Husto 








Bom 11 Jan 1903 i Place McCammon, Bannock. Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. | Place 


Baptized 


4 Auq 1911 




Died 17 Jul 1990 j Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


Endowed 


12 Dec 1923 






Buried 20 Jul 1990 Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Mamed 23 Mav 1928 i Place Loqan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


23 Mav 1928 


LOGAN 




Husband-s tather Charies Olin JEPPSON-4603 




MRIN: 539 






Husband-smother Roxv Lucina BLACKBURN-4604 






wife Maude Christina WEEKES-1 1 59 










Bom 4 Nov 1904 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




chr 4 Dec 1904 


Place Archer Ward, Fremont^ Idaho 


Baptized 


18 Jul 1913 






Died 5 Dec 1993 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


23 May 1928 


LOGAN 




Buried 9 Dec 1993 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






WHes father John Samuel WEEKES-25 




MRIN: 2 




wife's mother Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVER-1 349 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


1 


M 


Gerald W. JEPPSOfv 


-4605 






Bom 7AUQ1930 


Place Driggs, Teton, Idaho 


Baptized 


28 Auq 1938 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


26 Oct 1950 


IFALL 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




I 


Buried 


Place 








spouse Joan CLUFF-4609 




MRIN: 21 19 






Married 2 Aor 1954 I Place Idaho, Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


2 Apr 1954! IFALL 


2 


M 


Kav Lucien JEPPSON-4606 






Bom 28 Auq 1933 Place Driqqs, Teton, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 Aug 1941 






Chr. | Place 


Endowed 


10 Jun 1953 


IFALL 




Died 18 Jun 1998 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BrC 






Buried 22 Jun 1998 ] Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 




spouse Luella SMITH-4610 




MRIN: 2120 




Mamed 10Jun1953 I Place Idaho, Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


10 Jun 1953 I IFALL 


3 


M 


Peter Blair JEPPSON-4607 






Bom 1 Sep 1937 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Oct 1945 








Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


5 Jun 1957 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






spouse Lola WILMORE-461 1 




MRIN: 2121 






Mamed 5 Jun 1957 [piace Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


5 Jun 1957! IFALL 


4 


M 


Leslie Gene JEPPSON-4608 






Bom 13 Jul 1943 


Place Drigqs, Teton, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Aug 1951 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9 Aug 1962 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


. BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse Jill ROUNDY-4612 




MRIN: 2122 




Married 21 Oct 1968 i Place Loqan. Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


21 Oct 1968 I LOGAN 



167 





Gerald & Maude Jeppson Family 

Gerald and Maude, baby Jerry 
Maude and Gerald in Driggs 
The Jeppson Family 



168 




Maude & Gerald Jeppson Family 

Top Photo: Back: Gerald holding Gene, 
Maude, Jerry (Gerald), Kay. Front: Peter 
Center Photo: Back: Gene, Peter, Kay, Jerry 
( Gerald) Front: Gerald and Maude 
Lower Photo: Back: Joan, Jerry (Gerald) Peter, 
Kay, Luella Front: Gerald, Gene, Maude 






169 



GERALD & MAUDE CHRISTINA WEEKES JEPPSON FAMILY 

Maude Christina Weekes was born the 4th of November 1904, in Sunnydell, Idaho. Her 
parents were Ida Isabell Grover Weekes and John Samuel Weekes. She was the fifth child in a 
family of 1 1, being the third girl. She was born in the family home with a midwife assisting with 
the birth. Her father had told her many times of his anxiety as he rushed that night in a white top 
buggy to get Sister Walz, the midwife, as the mud was up to the wheel hubs a lot of the way. 

She was blessed one month later, December 4, 1904, in the Archer ward. She was born in 
a little four-room house on the same property where her father later built a new home. She didn't 
remember too much about the house, but she could remember her father saying he never knew 
where to find his bed if he had been gone all day, and came home after dark. Her Mother could 
move the room partitions in many different places as they were made of white cloth fastened to 
wooden braces on the floor. The kitchen was always the same, though, as the stove was 
stationary. 

Maude was baptized on July 18, 1913 in the Reid Canal, just x /z mile south of the Burns' 
store in Archer. Eight children came to bless her parent's home before her father built a large 
two-story frame house. Her father had a couple of men build it in return for a team of donkeys 
and a little bit of cash. She was eight years old at the time, and recalled pleasantly the smell of 
shavings and new lumber and the fun they had playing in the house as it was nearing its 
completion. Father Weekes soon had an electrical system of his own installed, and they had hot 
and cold water, and electric lights. She remembered how excited she was to finally get to move 
into the new home. 

She would play with Bertha and Opal in the sand pile behind the house, and would make 
mud pies, sometimes making a pretense of eating their creations, and get the visiting children to 
try a bite. 

As Maude grew up she attended school in Sunnydell, and recalled what a thrill it was to 
walk to school, cutting through the section where Sterling Magelby use to live. The land was 
undeveloped at the time and what a joy it was to gather flowers as they walked to and from 
school. The ground was covered with buttercups, snipes, pansies, sego lilies and bluebells. 
Grandma always had a great love for nature and took special joy in flowers. 

She attended Archer Schools from fourth to eighth grades, first in Uncle Herman 
Erickson's dance hall, then a year at the old rock schoolhouse across from Henry Erickson's 
present home. At last the new red brick schoolhouse in Archer was finished and she went there to 
finish the last three grades. 

In 1918 Maude graduated from the eighth grade in Archer. The next winter she didn't 
attend school, as it was impossible to get the farm work done in time. Her oldest brother, Leslie, 
was in the armed forces, and her older sister, Isabel, was on a mission, and a 1 7 year old brother, 
Lyman, had died in 1917. Bertha and she were the only help, except Ursel, who was only 10 at 
the time. Their dad had to run 230 acres of irrigated land and a small dry farm. With the war on, 
man-power was very limited, school was interrupted and often discontinued much of the time 
that winter due to a severe flu epidemic. 

She wrote "that was the year I turned from a girl to a boy." Maude learned to herd and 
milk cows, to do farm work, and many other masculine arts. But she loved it. She always thrilled 
at a newly plowed furrow, or the alfalfa shimmer before the cutter bar, and the sweet smell of 
new mown hay. One summer was spent on a Miskin scraper, leveling the west field. There 



170 



wasn't a rock in the field, and it was fascinating to watch the knoll disappear, and see a smooth 
brown carpet appear in the low places. 

In the fall of 1919 Maude and Bertha went to Rexburg to attend Ricks Academy for high 
school. Weekend trips by buggy or sleigh to and from town became part of her life. 

Spring of 1923 found her with a high school diploma. That summer she went to school, 
and in the fall she began teaching in Independence, Idaho. She taught the four lower grades. She 
taught for three years and went to school each summer. She taught two years at Sunnydell, her 
hometown school. She always enjoyed the teaching, both in school and in church capacities. Her 
patriarchal blessing told her teaching was her calling in life. It's a good thing it brought her so 
much joy. 

June 1, 1922, was a day Grandma will never forget. It was her first date with the 
handsome Gerald Jeppson. It was natural for the Jeppson's and the Weekes', going to Ricks at the 
same time, to go to and from Rexburg together on Sundays, and home on the weekends. 
Naturally, they were well acquainted by then. The night before graduation, Gerald asked Maude 
to go to Bertha's high school graduation with him. She was so surprised and shocked at the idea, 
but she was more than willing being 17 Vi years old at the time. Early in the morning she arose, 
primped up a bit and put on some fancy new clothes. She felt quite togged up and waiting for 
prince charming to arrive. They spent a wonderful day together, needless to say many a time 
during the day her heart had gone pity-pat. 

They had quite a few dates that summer, mostly church affairs in the ward. Maude loved 
to dance, she liked to three-step with Cleve Spaulding and Schottische with Carl Johnson. 

They dated steadily through December 6, 1923 at which time Gerald was called on a 
mission to Eastern Canada. Maude was glad to have a job teaching school, to keep her busy. 
Many letters were exchanged. Thirty months finally passed, June 26, 1926 arrived, and so did 
Gerald. 

On Christmas Eve, 1927, five years and seven months had passed since their first date. 
Gerald came again to the Weekes home. He was 25 and she was 23, no small wonder they had 
serious things on their minds. It was in a lovely setting that the question was popped. After a kiss 
and big squeeze, he received an affirmative answer. But if you asked Gerald the story, he would 
say, "Maude said wilt thou? And I wilted." 

May 23, 1928 was set as the wedding date. They pooled their money and bought 20 acres 
of land, a place to call home. Before going to get married, they planted a garden, so they would 
be all ready to move in and start a life together. Maude was sealed to Gerald Jeppa Jeppson in the 
Logan Utah Temple. Their honeymoon was spent visiting relatives in Utah, then home to the 
farm to start work. After spending 8 months at Archer, they moved to Hibbard and lived in two 
rooms at the Hibbard cheese factory where they worked, learning the cheese-making trade. 

In July of 1929 they moved to Driggs, and rented out their farm in Archer. They lived 
there many years. Gerald was managing a cheese factory, and Maude learned the art of writing 
reports, making the cheese, testing milk, and buying cream. She spent considerable time on the 
job, including washing vats and making boxes. They first lived in a duplex on Main Street, but in 
1932-33 they moved to a cottage behind the cheese factory without running water or a bathroom. 

While living in Driggs, they had four sons come to bless their home. Gerald W. was born 
in 1930, Kay in 1933, Peter in 1937, and Gene in 1943. The boys learned to work at an early age 
to help their father and relieve him of some work, so that time could be spent together as a 
family. She also taught her sons to do housework. They were active in the church and Maude had 
many callings, in Primary, Relief Society, MIA and Sunday School. She was very meticulous in 



171 



her callings and things had to be done right and speedily. She stayed at home being a good 
mother and influence to her children. As the boys grew older, Maude wanted to keep them closer 
to home, so she put them in dresses. It didn't help a bit, they went uptown dressed as they were, 
how embarrassing. Even still, she was most proud of her family. 

Maude made sure the families got together whenever possible. Many trips were taken 
into the canyon for parties, huckleberry picking, and get-togethers, 

In September of 1946 a home was purchased in Rexburg at 376 West 4th South, as 
Gerald was transferred to a cheese plant there. Maude was delighted to come back to their home 
town and own a home of their own. Gone were her cheese making days. However, there were 
many more advantages. For instance, they had a private bath for the first time in 18 years of 
married life. Soon a cow, pigs and chickens joined the scene. The boys learned a bit about 
farming. They had a large garden area, which was soon growing a larger variety of vegetables 
and flowers. Oh, how Maude loved her flower garden. She always took pride in the way her yard 
looked and was presented. She was so concerned with keeping it weed-free that you could 
sometimes see her weeding the ditch bank across the road, to keep the weeds from spreading to 
her yard. Even one weed in her precious flower garden was one-to-many. 

In 1948, Gerald retired from managing the cheese factory and took over the Chevron 
station a block away from their home. 

The boys enjoyed living in Rexburg, but they grew up all too soon. They all got married 
in the temple, and Maude finally had daughters to add to her life. Her family was enlarged to 
include 28 grandchildren and eventually 49 great-grandchildren. Her heart was large enough to 
give more love as the family grew. Maude was always the one to help out during the arrival of a 
new baby, traveling to Lola's and Jill's and always there for Luella and Joan. 

Maude was a wonderful cook. You never left her home or table hungry. When she 
cooked, she cooked and cooked. There was always enough to share with others. Most of all she 
had an over abundance of love to give away. She loved to play games with anyone that was 
willing to play with her. Rook was one of her favorites. 

Maude started to teach school again in 1955. She also cared for her Father in their home 
until he passed away in April 1956. He encouraged her to return to teaching, as he was proud that 
his girls were teachers. 

Gerald retired from the station in October 1971, after 23 years. In 1973 they traveled with 
Peter's family for six weeks, traveling through the United States, including Arizona, New 
Mexico, Texas, Florida, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington D. C, 
Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Canada, Vermont, the Hill Cumorah pageant, Omaha, 
Missouri, Illinois, Wyoming, and Idaho. 

In May, 1978, the family gathered at the Archer church to celebrate their 50th wedding 
anniversary. All of their family was there except two grandsons on missions. They were honored 
with a dinner, program, book of remembrance, and a picture quilt, which represented the major 
events in their lives. 

One of the big trials in her life was the Teton Dam Flood. In spite of all the work her own 
place entailed to get it back to normal, she found time and energy to help others whom she 
considered were worse off. She was very careful to be honest in all her dealings. 

Maude and Gerald lived together in the Rexburg home until July of 1990 when Gerald 
passed away. It was a hard time for Maude, as they had been together for 62 years. In a short 
interview, she was asked what part of her life she would like to live over. Her answer was 



172 



simply, "from May 1928 to July 1990", not because it needed changing, but, because she had 
loved being with Gerald that much, and they had a good life. 

When asked what things in life were a marvel to her, she recalled how much the times 
had changed. She had lived from the horse-drawn carriage to see automobiles, airplanes, and 
even space travel. She wasn't too fond of airplane travel, but was very grateful for cars. 

Her proudest moments were when her family was worthy to gather at the temple together. 

She had some advice for her grandchildren, "Keep close to the church, and bring your 
children up in the gospel, keep the commandments, listen to the Holy Ghost as a companion. 
Keep out of debt, spend less than you earn, honor your parents, but most of all, remember, prayer 
is the soul's sincerest desire." 

Maude said, "On my journey through life, when the going was rough or disappointments 
came, I've asked for strength and direction from our Father above. He has never failed me. And I 
have sincerely tried to keep the commitments that I made to him at those times, to follow His 
teachings, and to the best of my ability, keep his commandments." 

From History Written by Maude Jeppson 



173 



Family Group Record- 2119 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband Gerald W. JEPPSON-4605 




Bom 7Auq1930 


Place Driqqs, Teton, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr 


Place 


Baptized 


28Auq1938 


r~ i 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


26 Oct 1950 


IFALlTj 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


Married 2 Apr 1954 


Place Idaho. Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


2AdM954 


IFALL 


Husband's father Gerald Jeppa JEPPSON-1 299 




MRIN: 463 j 


Husband's mother Maude Christina WEEKES-1 1 59 


Wife 




Bom 18 Jul 1935 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


31 Jul 1943 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


2 Apr 1954 


i IFALL I 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


15 Feb 19921 IFALL 


Wife's father Owen Jonathan CLUFF-71 85 




MRIN: 2123 


wife's mother Idella Elizabeth SMITH-7193 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


Gerald Paul JEPPSON-7194 




Bom 31 May 1956 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1964 


IFALL 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


6 Jan 1975 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse Rebecca Jean MORRIS-7195 




MRIN: 3627 


Married 9 Oct 1982 I Place Idaho. Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


9 Oct 1982 T IFALL 


M 


Melvin Terry JEPPSON-7196 




Bom 15 Jul 1958 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5Auq 1966 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


3Auq1977 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 


spouse Sharon Lee WRIGHT-7197 




MRIN. 3628 


Married 1 Aua 198071 Place Los Angles. Los Anqles, California 


SeaISp 


1 Aua 1980 I LANGE 


M 


John Duane JEPPSON-7198 




Bom 2 May 1960 


place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 May 1968 1 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Jun 1979 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Starla Ruthene ARBUTHNOT-71 99 




MRIN: 3629 


Mamed 8 Jul 1983 I Place Idaho. Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


8 Jul! 983 1 IFALL~1 


F 


Marianne JEPPSON-7200 




Bom 19Auq1964 


place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


25 Aug 1 972 j 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


14 Jan 1984 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 






spouse David Lee WALKER Jr-720 1 




MRIN. 3630 


Married 15Jun1984 


Place Idaho, Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


15 Jun 1984 I IFALL 


M 


Joseph Charles JEP 


PSON-7202 




Bom 8Auq1972 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1980 




i 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


19 Jul 1991 


IFALL 


I 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




I 


Buried 


Place 








spouse Elizabeth MARSHALL-7203 




MRIN: 3631 




Mamed 2 Jun 1995 i Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


2 Jun 1995 f SLAKE 



174 




Gerald W. & Joan Cluff Jeppson Family 
Back: Melvin Terry, Gerald Paul, John Duane 
Front: Gerald W. Joan, Joseph, Marianne 




Back: Melvin Terry, Gerald Paul, John Duane, Starla, Lee Walker, Joseph 

Middle: Sharon, Rebecca, Marianne 

Front; Joan, Gerald W. (not pictured Elizabeth) 



175 



GERALD W. & JOAN CLUFF JEPPSON 

Gerald W. Jeppson was born in Driggs, Teton, Idaho, on 7 Aug 1930. He attended Teton 
High School (1944-1946) and graduated from Madison High School in 1948. He earned a 
Bachelor of Science degree at Ricks College, major Elementary Ed, Minors in biology and 
sociology, and ED M at Oregon State University in counseling and psychology in 1964. Post 
graduate work at the University of Utah (1958-59) in math and science, Idaho State University in 
administration and special ed, Boise State University in cooperative education. His career 
included teaching grade 6 for two years, and 8 l grade and elementary school principal at Parker 
for four years. He taught at Sugar-Salem high school for one year, was high school counselor in 
Rigby High School for 18 years. He was Rigby Junior High School administrator for 12 years. 
He served on the Sugar Salem District School Board for 12 years. 

His L.D.S. callings have included branch president, adult Aaronic Priesthood general 
secretary, various scouting callings (60 yrs.), ward and stake YMMIA, Bishop Executive 
Secretary twice, Bishop's Counselor, High Priest Group Leader, Bishop, Ricks College high 
councilman, Sunday School teacher and was Sunday School president twice. He served a 
mission in California (1950-52), and then again with his wife in Athens, Greece (1995-97). He 
also served as a missionary at BYU Idaho for several years. He serves as a temple ordinance 
worker in the Idaho Falls Temple. His wife, Joan Cluff was born 18 Jul 1935 in Rexburg. They 
were married on 2 Apr 1954 in the Idaho Falls Temple. They have five children, all born in 
Rexburg, Idaho, graduated from Sugar-Salem schools, and received Associate degrees from 
Ricks College. All four sons are Eagle Scouts. 

Gerald Paul Jeppson was born 31 May 1956. He received a BS in Business Management 
at BYU Provo, and a MAOM degree from Phoenix University. He served a mission in Chile 
Concepcion/Osorno. He has served as a Bishop's counselor twice, scoutmaster several times, and 
is currently in the YM presidency. He has worked for Burgoyne Computers a couple of years, 
and at BYU Idaho for 25 years, presently as Information Technology Project Manager. His wife 
is Rebecca Jean Morris, a registered nurse, who was born 26 May 1959, in Suffolk, Virginia, and 
was raised in Atlanta, Georgia. They were married 9 Oct 1 982 in the Idaho Falls Temple. They 
have four children: Kristi Jo (19 Feb 1984), Gerald Ryan (7 Nov 1986), Lauren Nicole (24 Oct 
1990) and Zachary Vaughn (22 Jul 1994). 

Melvin Terry Jeppson was born 15 Jul 1958. He earned an AS in 1980 at Ricks College 
(Pre-med). He received a BS from BYU Provo majoring in Microbiology and Chemistry in 1981. 
His Doctor of Medicine was awarded at University of Utah in 1986. He completed a four year 
OB-GYN residency at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak Michigan in 1990. He is 
currently in private practice as an OBGYN doctor in Burley, Idaho. He served an LDS mission in 
the Pennsylvania Pittsburgh mission. His Church service includes: Elder's Quorum President, 
Stake YM presidency, Primary pianist, Sunday School teacher, High Priest Group leader 
assistant, and High Councilor. His wife, Sharon Lee Wright, a registered nurse, was born on 2 1 
July 1959 in Fontana, California. They were married 1 Aug 1980 in the Los Angeles Temple. 
They have four children: Rebekah, (31 Aug 1981) who married John David Fitch, 8 Jun 2001, in 
the Idaho Falls Temple. At this time they have one daughter, Faith Joan Fitch, deceased (20 Jul 
2004-24 May 2005); Michael Terry Jeppson, 5 Jun 1984 (Mission in Florida Jacksonville); 
Jennifer (17 Nov 1988); and Kimberlee (21 May 1992). 



176 



John Duane Jeppson was born 2 May 1960. He also received a Bachelor's degree from 
BYU Provo and did graduate work in microbiology. He received his Doctor's Degree (M.D.) at 
University of Utah where he did a Pediatric Residency. While at the University of Utah, John 
participated in original research and had several papers published, and presented at national 
meetings. He did a post graduate fellowship at National Jewish Hospital in Denver, Colorado, in 
Allergy and Immunology. He is the senior partner in the largest allergy practice in Idaho. The 
family lives in Boise, Idaho. Their greatest challenge occurred in 1996 when John was diagnosed 
with cancer, a high grade sarcoma. He had several surgeries, radiation and chemotherapy. Eight 
wonderful years later, all is well. He served a mission in Canada British Columbia. His Church 
positions include Elders Quorum President, Gospel Doctrine Sunday School teacher, counselor 
in a bishopric, High Council, Bishop, and currently serves as the 2 nd counselor in the Stake 
Presidency. His wife, Starla R. Arbuthnot (RN), was born 14 Oct 1962, in San Bernadino, 
California. They were married 8 Jul 1983. Their children are: John David (24 Oct 1986), Jacob 
Alan (9 Jul 1990), and Elizabeth Joy (10 Mar 1993). 

Marianne Jeppson was born 19 Aug 1964. She received an associate degree in Arts and 
Science and earned her degree as a registered nurse at Ricks College. Her husband, David Lee 
Walker, was born in Tucson, Arizona on 26 Mar 1962. They were married 15 Jun 1984 in the 
Idaho Falls Temple. Marianne worked at Utah Valley Hospital while helping Lee finish his BS at 
BYU, but her lifetime career has been that of a wife and mother, teacher, chauffeur, organizer, 
cook, homemaker, and good example. She has served in many primary callings on a ward and 
stake level including chorister, organist and in the ward and stake Primary presidencies. She has 
also served in the Relief Society and Young Women's presidencies. They have four children: 
Allison (1 Aug 1986), Sean David (20 Apr 1989), Kelly (9 Jan 1994), and Katie (24 Aug 1999). 

Joseph Charles Jeppson was born 8 Aug 1972. He attended BYU Provo. He received his 
DMD degree from Oregon Health Science University at Portland, Oregon. His dental practice is 
in Provo, Utah. Joseph served a French speaking mission in Geneva, Switzerland. He has served 
as a teacher in the Sunday School and Primary, YM presidency. Activities Committee Chairman, 
and in the Elders Quorum he has served as secretary, twice as a counselor, and as president. His 
wife, Elizabeth Marshall, was born on 31 Jul 1974, in Ogden, Utah. They were married 2 Jun 
1995 in the Salt Lake Temple. They have two children, Jackson McKay (8 Jul 1998), and Ellie 
Grace (20 June 2001). 

It is my hope and prayer the descendants of my John Weekes grandparents will seek to 
learn and honor their memory and lives. We should cherish and emulate the example of their 
church and community service, the powerful work ethic they adhered to, the encouragement for 
education, missions, genealogy, thrift and fidelity. 

Our heritage came from the lives and testimony of faithful pioneers, they blessed us with 
lessons on the value of gardens, home, prayer, importance of temple covenants, and faith. May it 
be our goal to live in such a manner that our decisions may be guided by the Holy Spirit and will 
enable us to be reunited and be together for eternity. 

I know that the Lord has provided prophets to lead us, the Book of Mormon to guide and 
inspire us. His great plan of salvation gives us peace and direction. Priesthood power to bless us 
and the atoning gift of his Son to save us. The restoration is true. May we be enriched and 
motivated to be recipients of His promises. . 



177 



Family Group Record- 2120 



Page 1 of 2 





Husband Kav Lucien JEPPSON-4606 






Bom 28 Auq 1933 i Place Driqqs, Teton, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr j Place 


Baptized 


31 Auq 1941 






Died 18Jun1998 { Place ArcherJMadison, Idaho 


Endowed 


10 Jun 1953 


IFALL 




Buried 22 Jun 1998 ' Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Married 10Jun1953 Place Idaho, Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


10 Jun 1953 


IFALL 




Husbands father Gerald Jeppa JEPPSON-1 299 


MRIN: 463 




Husbands mother Maude Christina WEEKES-1 1 59 






wife LuellaSMITH-4610 


""^ 


Bom 3 Oct 1936 i Place Lyman, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


I 

! 


Chr i Place 


Baptized 


30 Jun 1945^ 




Died I Place 


Endowed 


10 Jun 1953i IFALL 


Buried | Place 


SealPar 


! 


wifes father James Ivan SMITH-7222 


MRIN: 2124 






wife-smother Sara Elizabeth BRANSON-7223 






Children List each child in order of birth. I lds ordinance dates Temple 


1 


M 


James Kay JEPPSON-7204 






Bom 3 Mar 1955 


Place Kileen, Bell, Texas 


Baptized 


2 Mar 1963 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


30 Mar 1974 


IFALL 




Died 8 Nov 1997 


Place Monterey, Monterey, California 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 14 Nov 1997 I Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison, Idaho 




spouse Mindy Jolene DANSIE-7205 


MRIN: 3632 { 






Married 14 Apr 1978 I Place Oakland, Alameda, California I seaisp 


14 Apr 1978 i OAKLA I 


2 


F 


LeAnn JEPPSON-7206 






Bom 8 Apr 1957 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 May 1965 j 




Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


j 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICT 




Buried 


Place 






spouse Kirk Clive STANGER-7207 


MRIN: 3633 I 






Mamed 21 Feb 1975 (D) I Ptace Archer Madison. Idaho I seaisp 


I I 




spouse Steve SUTTON-7208 


MRIN: 3634 






Married 29 Auq 1986 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho |SealSp 




3 


F 


Shellie JEPPSON-7209 






Bom 14 Mar 1958 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Apr 1966 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 








Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse Shawn BERTHELSEN-721 1 


MRIN: 3635 




Mamed 13 Auq 1976 (D) I Place Archer, Madison, Idaho I Seaisp 




spouse James Howard WR IGHT-72 1 


MRIN: 3636 


4 




Mamed 23 Jul 1981 ! Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho Jseaisp 


F 


GailJEPPSON-7212 




Bom 9 May 1960 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


25 May 1968 i 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Jun 1989 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 






Spouse Galen MILLS-7213 


MRIN: 3637 




Married 16Jun1978 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho jseaisp 


16 Jun 1989 1 IFALL 


5 


F ! 


4 






Bom 7 Auq 1961 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1969 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


27 May 1989 1 IFALL 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC I 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse Clifford Kesl NEILSON-721 5 


MRIN: 3638 


6 




Married 18 Nov 1983 ! Place Archer, Madison, Idaho Iseaisp 


27 May 1989! IFALL 


M 


Steven Robert JEPPSON-7216 




Bom 23 Jul 1965 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


15 Oct 1973 




I 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


15 Auq 1984 


IFALL 


i 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 


Place 


prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 




Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 






E-mail address carl(8)srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 




Dale prepared 5 Apr 2006 


83401 USA 



178 



Family Group Record- 2120 



Page 2 of 2 



Husband Kav Lucien JEPPSON-4606 


wrfe LuellaSMITH-4610 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M Steven Robert JEPPSON-721 6 


spouse Keni Lee MOSS-721 7 






MRIN: 3639 


j Mamed 10 Jun 1988 ! Place Idaho, Falls. Bonneville, Idaho I Seaisp 


10 Jun 1998 


IFALL 


F ! Jana JEPPSON-721 


8 


LBom 7 Feb 1967 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Mar 1975 




| Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


11 Mar 1988 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Jacob Andrew SIEPERT-72 19 






MRIN: 3640 


Mamed 31 Dec 1996 Place Sunnvdell. Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 






F I Kristina JEPPSON-7220 


Bom 23 May 1971 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jun 1979 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


12 Mar 1993 


IFALL 


{Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




j Buried 


Place 


Spouse Bill Allen 2 
[wamed 12 Mar 1993 


:iEGLER-7221 






MRIN: 3641 


Place Idaho, Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


12 Mar 1993 


IFALL 



179 




Kay & Luella Jeppson Family 
Back; Maria, Gail, Jimmy, LeAnn Front: Steven 
Luella, Jana, Kay holding Kristine, Shellie 




Back; LeAnn Sutton, Maria Neilsen, Steve Jeppson, Gail Mills 
Front: Kris Zeigler, Luella Jeppson, Jana Seipert, Shellie Wright 



180 



KAY L. & LUELLA SMITH JEPPSON 

Kay Lucein Jeppson was born on August 28, 1933 in Driggs, Idaho to Gerald Jeppa 
Jeppson and Maude Christina Weekes. There was no hospital so Kay was born at home in a 
small house they lived in behind the Driggs Nelson Ricks Creamery. He was the second son of 
four boys born to the Jeppsons; Gerald, Kay, Peter and Gene. 

Kay loved animals and the out-of-doors. He learned to ski off the potato cellars around 
Driggs. He read a lot, especially comic books, much to his mother's distress. He spent time 
playing and tending his brothers. When Kay was thirteen the family moved to Rexburg. They 
owned a very small acreage. They had a large garden and a cow. It was Kay's job to milk the cow 
and help with the yard and garden. 

Around 1943 Kay started spending the summer months with Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith 
Clements at their farm in Archer. He was happy learning to farm and run the farm equipment, he 
was also milking cows and irrigating the crops. 

Kay graduated from Madison High School in 1951. That summer he went to work for the 
Coke-a-Cola company driving truck delivering soda pop from Rexburg to Driggs. In 1952 he 
attended Ricks College. The following summer he hired out to Newell Piquet and also farmed his 
parent's 20 acre farm in Archer. At the same time he was dating Luella Smith. 

On June 10, 1953 Kay and Luella were married in the Idaho Falls Temple. They moved 
into a home owned by Keith Clements in Archer and Kay started farming full time for him. In 
March 1954 Kay was inducted into the armed forces, during the Korean conflict. He did his basic 
training at Fort Ord. California. In June, Kay and Luella moved to Texas. He served at Fort Hood 
for 18 months. While there Kay and Luella had their first child, James Kay. Jim was born on 
March 3, 1955. 

March 1956 Kay was discharged from the army and the family moved back to Uncle 
Keith's house. Kay farmed for Keith in the summer and worked for U & I Sugar Company in 
Idaho Falls for a few months in the winter, and then he worked at the potato warehouse until 
spring. He did this rotation until 1962 when he started full time at the Sugar Factory. By this time 
their little family had grown into eight. James Kay (March 3, 1955), LeAnn (April 8, 1957), 
Shellie (March 14, 1958), Gail (May 9, 1960), and Maria (August 7, 1961). 

Kay and Luella purchased 20 acres in Archer that belonged to his parents and built their 
home there. On July 23, 1965 Steven Robert was born. Kay continued to farm, he rented farms 
and also farmed his own land, at the same time he milked cows and continued to work for U & I. 
Jana was born on February 7, 1967 and on May 23, 1971 Kristina completed the family of eight 
children. Kay worked at U & I for 23 years where he was the General Foreman and President of 
the Labor Union when the factory closed its doors in 1979. 

After the factory closed Kay attended Eastern Idaho Technical College in Idaho Falls and 
completed the farm mechanics program. At this time Luella was also going to the Vo-Tech to get 
her Associate Degree in Nursing. After school Kay went to work for the Ririe Producers Co-op 
until his retirement in 1 996. 

Kay spent a lot of time coaching little league baseball, he especially liked teaching good 
sportsmanship to the boys. He liked playing basketball, snowmobiling, fishing and hunting with 
his cousins, John and Reid Nelson, and many other friends. 

In 1972 Kay sold the milk cows and started raising horses, Missouri Fox Trotters to be 
exact. He loved the horses and raised many colts. He loved going to the horse shows and sales. 
He sold horses into Utah, Wyoming, Montana and California. As a family they camped, fished. 



181 



traveled and enjoyed each others company. The kids would rather go camping and trail riding for 
vacation than anything else. Kay and Luella had 3 children serve full-time missions. Jim served 
in Portland, Oregon, Steve served in Charleston, West Virginia, and Jana went to San Diego 
California. Kay served in many church callings including Elders Quorum President, High Priest 
Presidency and he sang in the ward choir. Kay and Luella were workers in the Idaho Falls 
Temple for 1 8 years and were also able to serve together as Stake Missionaries. 

In 1996 Kay retired from the Co-op but was not content staying at home, so he started 
driving a shuttle bus to Salt Lake City two days a week. He really enjoyed meeting new people. 
He did this until June 18, 1998, when he died from a severe heart attack. 

Luella retired from her work as a nurse in 1999 and has been able to enjoy traveling 
with her children and friends. 

Jim married Mindy Dansie in the Oakland California Temple on April 14, 1978. He 
served in scouting and the nursery for 20 years, and coached two ball teams every season. He 
was a construction supervisor for government jobs. Jim passed away on November 8, 1997. 
Mindy is currently trying to land her dream job at BYU-I and moving to Rexburg. They have 
four boys. All received their Eagle Scout Rank and graduated with honors. Trenton James (May 
2, 1979) served a mission in Georgia and graduated from Ricks College as a Paramedic. He was 
sealed to Amy Weston, they have one daughter, Rylie, and a child on the way. Jordon Ty (March 
22, 1981) lives in Los Angeles and is in a band. Colter Seth (June 10, 1983) is currently serving a 
mission in the South Pacific on the island of Pohnepie. Britton Cade (May 2, 1986) graduated 
from high school last year and works for a photographer and at a feed store. 

LeAnn is married to Steve J. Sutton. They live in Lyman, Idaho. They currently own and 
operate a trucking company and a dispatch company. LeAnn has five children; Jeffrey C. Stanger 
(August 10, 1976), Jaime Lee Stanger Poole (February 8, 1978), John Stanger (July 13, 1983), 
Tyler J. Sutton (October 2, 1986) and Travis Sutton (January 2, 1988). She has 3 grandkids. 
They enjoy gardening, yard work and fishing in Salmon, Idaho. 

Shellie and James H. Wright were married on July 23, 1981. Together they had four 
children and Jim adopted Shellie's daughter, Heather Jo (November 3, 1977), Jennifer Kay 
(November 27, 1981), Josh James (March 22, 1983), Tina Jade (July 2, 1984), and Destrie Ann 
(January 17, 1986). Shellie works for Printcraft Press in Idaho Falls and Jim works for Melaleuca 
in Rexburg. They live east of Rigby and enjoy raising horses and gardening. They now have four 
grandchildren 

Gail married Galen Mills on June 16, 1978. They were later sealed in the Idaho Falls 
Temple. Galen is employed at Taylor Chevrolet in Rexburg as the Truck Shop Foreman. Gail 
works at Madison High School as a para-educator. They both enjoy working in the yard and 
camping. They have four children. The oldest, Caleb, is looking forward to graduating from 
BYU-I with a Bachelors Degree in landscaping, and starting his own business. He married Jana 
Muir, she is a homemaker, they have two children, Zachariah (2 yrs) and Makinley (10 months). 
Tucker is currently living in Maine and trying to make a life for himself there. Holly has an 
Associates Degree in accounting, and is employed in Ogden, Utah working with accounts 
receivable. Shannon, the youngest is working in Ririe, Idaho and is looking forward to college 
this fall. 

Maria married Kesl Neilson on November 18, 1983. They were later sealed in the Idaho 
Falls Temple on May 27, 1989. They bought Kesl's parent's farm in Egin, Idaho and have lived 
there for 20 years. Kesl farms and does construction, Maria works as the office manager and 



182 



does Medical Records billing for a local Pediatric clinic. They have seven children: Selina 
Elizabeth (January 24, 1985), Alyssa Belle (June 26, 1987), Chet Kesl (July 6, 1988), Jake Ryan 
(January 16, 1990), Russell Wade (February 7, 1992), Kendra JoElle (March 25, 1994) and 
Emma Ann (June 12, 1999). 

Steven Robert Jeppson's family was started on June 10, 1988 when Steve married Keni L. 
Moss in the Idaho Falls Temple. They lived in Rexburg for just over a year, in that time Kody 
Steven was born on June 2, 1989. They moved to Driggs, Idaho where they now live. Chad 
Robert was born on May 4, 1992 and on October 5, 1994 Keli Brooke was born. Their last child, 
Alix Sara was born December 6, 1996. They have lived in Driggs for 16 years and have made 
plenty of friends and are very involved in the community and church. Steven has worked at the 
Jackson Hole Airport for 14 years and Keni cleans houses in Jackson. They play on a co-ed 
softball team together. They are all very active in sports and play the piano, their girls even do 
gymnastics and dance. They all love to ski in the winter and play baseball in the summer. 

Jana was born on February 7, 1967, the seventh child of Kay and Luella. She graduated 
from Madison High School in Rexburg in 1985. She immediately went on to attend Career 
Beauty College, she graduated with her cosmetology license in 1986. During this year in beauty 
school she met Jake Siepert, however they were just good friends and pursued different paths in 
life. After a couple of years in the work force, she was called to serve a mission in San Diego 
California. After her mission she moved back to Rexburg and got a job working for Beehive 
Federal Credit Union, she was a consumer and real estate loan officer for 9 years. She decided to 
change careers and now works as a legal secretary. She dated Jacob Andrew Siepert, "Mr. 
Wonderful" for several years. Jana and Jacob A. Siepert were married on December 31, 1996. 
They continue to live just west of Rexburg in the home they bought from his parents. 

Kris and Bill Allen Ziegler were sealed in the Idaho Falls Temple on March 12, 1993. 
Shortly after that Bill graduated form ISU Technical College with a degree in Diesel/Diesel 
Electric. They moved to Sunnydell in the spring of 1995, living next to Kris' parents. They have 
4 beautiful daughters, Paige (June 13, 1996), Hannah Louise (May 16, 1998), Kaylee May 
(September 10, 2000), and Mady Ann (August 9, 2002). They built a new home in 2000 and still 
live next to Luella 



183 



Family Group Record 



Pagel of 2 



Husband Peter Blair JEPPSON 




Bom 1 Sep 1937 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


6 Oct 1945 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


5 Jun 1957 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Married 5 Jun 1 957 


place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


5 Jun 1957 


IFALL 


Husband's father Gerald Jeppa JEPPSON 






Husband's mother Maude Christina WEEKES 






Wife 




Bom 1 Feb 1938 


Place Hibbard, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


2 Feb 1946 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


5 Jun 1957 


^JFALL 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


wife's father James Leslie WILMORE 


wife's mother Fawn HENDRICKS 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


Gerald Blair JEPPSON 




Bom 15 Jul 1958 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Auq 1966 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


30 Auq 1977 


"OAKLA 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Marie FEUERSTEIN 






Married 5 Jul 1980 (D) I Place Oakland. Alameda, California 


SeaISp 


5 Jul 1980! OAKLA 


Spouse Barbara WINDMAN 


Married 3 Oct 2000 ! Place Oakland. Alameda. California 


SeaISp 


3 Oct 2000 I OAKLA 


M 


Alan Trent JEPPSON 




Bom 15 Mar 1960 


Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


30 Mar 1968 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


13 Jun 1979 


IFALL 


Died | Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried I Place 


spouse Christina Marie FISHER 




Married 17 Dec 1994 (D) i Place Modesto. Stanislaus, California 


SeaISp 


i 

i 




spouse Donna DOROTHEO 








Mamed 3 Jun 2006 i Place Newport Beach. Oranoe, California 


SeaISp 


3 Jun 2006! NBEAC 


F 


Leslie Ann JEPPSON 




Bom 5 Sep 1961 


piace Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1 969 j 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


3 Auq 1983 OAKLA 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC i 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Scott Jay PETTINGILL 


Married 5 Auq 1983 | Place Oakland. Alameda, California 


SeaISp 


5 Auo 1983 I OAKLA 


spouse Mark Wiriq BUCKLEY 


Married 20 Jun 1987 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


20 Jun 19871 SLAKE 


F 


Brenda Lou JEPPSON 




Bom 5 May 1963 Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


5 Jun 1971, 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


30 Dec 1992 


OAKLA 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Shurwin Udell HUFF 


Mamed 2 May 1987 i Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


SeaISp 


I 


F 


Julee JEPPSON 




[jk>m 2 Apr 1968 


place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


10 Apr 1976 I 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


7 Apr 1 989 ! PROVO 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC l 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Kyle Erik BATEMAN 








Married 28 Auq 1991 ! Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


SeaISp 


28 Auo 1991] PROVO 



_Cari Nykamp 



208-523-7378 



E-maii addr ess c a ri@srv.myrf.net 

Dateprepared 1 7 Apr 2006 



Address 14054 N 65 E 



Idaho Falls 
Idaho 



83401 USA 



184 



Family Group Record 



Page 2 of 2 



Husband Peter Blair JEPPSON 


wife Lola WILMORE 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


F | Michelle JEPPSON 




Bom 20Auq1971 


Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


29 Sep 1979 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Sep 1995 


IFALL 


[Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Anthony Evan WENDELL 


Mamed 10 Jul 1993 Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


SeaISp 


16 Sep 19951 IFALL 


M 


Jared Lynn JEPPSON 




Bom 22 Jul 1974 


Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


30 Jul 1982 j 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


19Auq1993| OAKLA 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Sarah Beth SPENCER 


Married 9 Oct 1998 Place Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah 


SeaISp 


9 Oct 1998! MTIMP 


F 


Sharee JEPPSON 




Bom 10 Nov 1976 


Place Modesto, Stanislaus, California 


Baptized 


1 Dec 1984 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


23 Dec 1996 


SLAKE 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Aaron Jon BUHLER 




Mamed 27 Dec 1996Tpiace Oakland, Alameda, California 


SeaISp 


27 Dec 1996 I OAKLA 



185 




Peter & Lola Jeppson Family 
Back: Alan, Jared, Brenda Front: Michelle, Peter, Lola, Sharee. 
Blair, Leslie, Julee 




186 



PETER & LOLA JEPPSON FAMILY 

Back: Jared, Spencer (baby), Beth. Kyle, Amelia (baby) and Julie Bateman, Mark and 

Leslie Buckley. Alan, Alison, Mathew, Andrew, Jeremy Ashworth, Jenessa Huff, Tony Wendell. 

Aaron Buhler 

Middle: Erin Buckley, Gina, Peter and Lola, Barbara and Blair Shurwin and Brenda Huff, 
Madeline Huff, Michelle and Wyatt (baby) Wendell, Sharee and Carter (baby) Buhler 

Front: Hannah. Jonah and Riley Bateman. Megan and Sara Buckley, Fawn Willmore, 
Brian Ashworth, Forrest and Alta Huff, Alexis Wendell, Emma Buhler, Samantha Wendell 



PETER BLAIR & LOLA WILLMORE JEPPSON FAMILY 

We lived in Driggs, Idaho, until I was about nine years old and then we moved to 
Rexburg, Idaho. My childhood memories in Driggs were very pleasant. As I was born September 
1, 1937, I was too young to remember the start of World War II. However, I can remember the 
joyous celebration as little Driggs came to a standstill as first the Germans and then the Japanese 
surrendered. 

I remember being at Dad's cheese factory when somebody brought in a large crane (bird) 
housed in a crate. As I knelt down beside the crate the crane latched on to my nose with its beak. 
I couldn't understand why everyone was laughing as I thought I would lose my nose. They even 
had time to take a picture before they pried the beak open to release a tearful boy. My friend 
Jimmy Miekle and I found a large box of stolen loot and returned it to the grocery store. They 
rewarded us with candy and goodies and we became town hero's or at least we thought so. One 
night before a party at our house I was bringing the scissors to my Mom. I slipped on a rug and 
rammed one of the scissor blades through my nose and into my head between my eyes. I 
remember my Mother's horror. Party forgotten, I was taken to Dr. Hoffman who after removing 
the scissors spent a lot of time trying to stop the bleeding. The Doctor did compliment me on my 
aim as I barely missed my eyes and brain. I can remember David O. McKay coming to Driggs to 
dedicate the Driggs Stake House. Even though I didn't realize it at the time it was the first time 
that I was in the presence of my future wife, Lola, as she was living in their Tetonia summer 
home and was at the dedication as a flower girl. Later that year I remember being baptized in that 
chapel. 

When we moved to Rexburg my carefree childhood was pretty much over. I came to 
understand the family belief that there should be no idle time. The endless job of milking, animal 
care, planting, watering, weeding, harvesting, canning, root cellars, ditch cleaning, thistle 
removal, fence repair, mowing, painting, pruning and housework. 

The fact that we produced way too much was a good goal as Mother could always come 
up with a list of needy people that we could deliver the surplus to. The fact that none of these 
people had gardens, animals or chores for their children to do didn't deter her in the slightest. In 
spite of being busy there was enough time for the most spacious and beautiful flower garden in 
town. Now I realize that there was real talent in dispensing various flowers through out the beds 
so there was a blaze of colors early and late. Memorial day was an annual process and parade to 
the Archer cemetery. The bridal wreath, peonies, tulips, daffodils, lilacs, and everything else in 
early bloom were cut and placed in large metal bathtubs with water. When all related families 
converged, the tubs were merged into one large florist inventory. We kids tried to sneak away 
and play with all the cousins, but usually found the leash was short. The flowers were arranged 
into what seemed endless bouquets. We kids didn't know many of the names on the headstones, 
but it was a day when annually we heard stories about each one of them. I'm not sure we kids 
thought much about it then but I sure miss it now. 

Like many, I started working summers at Keith and Opal's farm. It soon taught me that I 
didn't want to be a farmer. Animals to care for before and after dark, full days in the fields and 
many nights irrigating. I made about $1.50 a day. But being very young and inexperienced I was 
not much help I'm afraid. I'll never forget when I parked the tractor and barrel scraper on the 
small hill at the railroad crossing and went down to close the fence gate. I heard a large crash and 
saw the rig had rolled down the hill and the barrel scraper was upside down. 1 had failed to set 



187 



the brakes. I wanted to wander away and never come back, but I had to face Keith and tell him 
what had happened. The tongue of the scraper was twisted completely around. What a mess! 

I made it sound like it was all work at home, yet on weekends, and when family gathered, 
we played a lot of games, especially Rook. The only grandparent I knew was Grandpa Weekes. 
One of my jobs was to play games with him when he was bored. He loved to play Chinese 
checkers. I played it so much I have never liked it since. Grandpa had dandruff and liked his 
head scratched with a double twined comb. We got a recliner for Grandpa that was still around 
when we sold the house. I remember how much fun it was to go to the Weekes home in Archer. 
We played with cousins in the large yard, orchard, outbuildings and the large house. 

My Mother was a determined lady. I became an eagle scout with her determination. 
Along the way I learned that anything could be accomplished if one was willing to pay the price. 
Even at her end she could still out work us. Lola was always humbled trying to keep up with her. 
She and her sisters were a breed apart. Dad told us that when he was a young man that none of 
the young men would work for Grandpa Weekes because they were outworked by the Weekes 
sisters. I have never met anyone with more faith than my Mother. Her determination was as great 
in living her religion as it was in working hard. Oh, what a great heritage we are blessed with. I 
pray we can pass it on. 

I married Lola Willmore June 5, 1957, in the Idaho Falls Temple. Our first son was born 
on 15 Jul 1958. I graduated from BYU in accounting Aug 1958. In January 1959 we moved to 
Modesto, California, where we raised our eight children. In Jan 1993 we sold our home in 
Modesto. We went on two missions, to Kentucky and Tennessee. We have traveled and visited 
our children for the last eleven years. In October 2004 we bought a home in Highland, Utah, so 
we can't say we are homeless anymore. 

Blair and Barbara live in Modesto, California. Blair is a partner in a large Medical 
Insurance Company. Barbara is a Hand Therapist and works a few days a week. Their two 
oldest, Mathew and Andrew, live with us in the winter and go to UVSC. Barbara's two boys and 
Blair's youngest are still in high school. 

Alan lives in Modesto and works with Blair in insurance. Alan married Donna Dorotheo 
Rogers 3 June 2006, in the Newport Beach Temple. He has his darling little Gina half of each 
week. She plays the piano and the violin. 

Leslie and Mark live in Modesto. Mark is a Farmer's Insurance agent. Leslie works one 
day a week as a nurse practitioner for the school. They bought the home we raised our family in. 
Their twin daughters play the violin, and Sara plays the cello. 

Brenda and Shurwin live in Sandy, Utah. Shurwin is an X-ray tech at St. Marks hospital. 
Brenda is a Real-estate agent. Their children all play the violin. The girls take voice and sing 
beautifully. 

Julee and Kyle live in Provo, Utah. They have four talented children and are expecting 
their fifth. The boys play the piano and one is taking the flute and the other is learning guitar. 

Michelle and Tony live in Richland, Washington. Tony is an RN. Michelle is a Message 
Therapist and works a few days a week. Alexis went to Disneyland this year with the Steel Band 
group from her school. 

Jared and Beth live in Modesto. Jared works for a Commercial Insurance group. Beth is a 
seamstress and sells a lot of children's clothes she designs, on the internet. 

Sharee and Aaron live in St. David, Arizona. Aaron is a seminary teacher and Principal. 
Sharee is a Dental Hygienist and may start working again one day a week when the baby is a 
little older. 

Life is good! The gospel is True! We have a great heritage!! 



188 



Family Group Record- 4141 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Leslie Gene JEPPSON-10417 




Bom 13 Jul 1943 


piace Driqgs, Teton, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr 


Place 


Baptized 


4Auq1951 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


9Auq1962 


IFALL I 


Bunerf 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 


Married 21 Oct 1968 


Place Loqan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


21 Oct 1968 I LOGAN | 


Husbands father Gerald Jef 
Husband's mother Maude Ch 


)Da JEPPSON-6258 




MRIN: 2126 i 


ristinaWEEKES-6115 




i 


Wife 




Bom 7 Mar 1943 


Place Brigham Citv, Box Elder, Utah 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


31 Mar 1951 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Oct 1968 


tOGAN I 


Buried 


Piace 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


wife's father Eldridqe Rees ROUNDY-14420 






MRIN: 6290 


wife's mother Elva Lucille CHRISTENSEN-14421 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


Daniel Gene JEPPSON-14422 




Bom 30 Aug 1969 


place Rexburg. Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2SeDl977 


i 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


7 Oct 1988 


IFALL^ 


Died 


Place 


SeaPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse Vauna Monique CROMWELL-14423 




MRIN: 6291 


Married 26 Jul 1991 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


26 Jul 1991 I IFALL 


F 


Anaelia JEPPSON-14424 




Bom 18 Feb 1972 


Pface Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas 


Baptized 


1 Mar 1980 | 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


11 Dec 1992 IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Ben Lowell ASHCRAFT-14425 




MRIN: 6292 


Married 18 Dec 1992 I Pface Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


18Dec1992i IFALL 


F 


Rachel JEPPSON-14426 




Bom 4 Dec 1973 


Place Smithville, Clay, Missouri 


Baptized 


5 Dec 1981 


: 


Chr. 
Died 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Dec 1993 


IFALL j 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


i 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Michael Allen GUYMON-1 4427 




MRIN: 6293 | 


Married 18 Dec 1993 I Pface Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


18 Dec 1993 I IFALL ! 


M 


Nathan Rees JEPPSON-14428 




Bom 11 Apr 1975 


Place Smithville, Clay, Missouri 


Baptized 


30 Apr 1983, 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


27 May 1994 1 IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC I 


Buried 


Place 






spouse Rachelle RICKS-14429 




MRIN: 6294 


Married 20 Nov 2001 i Pface Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


j SeaISp 


20 Nov 2001 i SLAKE 


F 


Wendy JEPPSON-14430 




Bom 27 Mav 1977 


Place Smithville, Clay, Missouri 


Baptized 


1 Jun 1985 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


29 Apr 1997 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 






i 


Spouse PhillifjCa 
Married 2 Mav 1997 (D) 


1 WALLSTEDT-14431 




MRIN: 6295 


! pface Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


[SeafSp 


2 May 1997 I IFALL 


spouse Benjamin Nathan THOMANDER-14432 




MRIN: 6296 | 


Married 2 Nov 2002 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


2 Nov 2002 I IFALL ! 


M 


Joshua Rvan JEPPSON-14433 




Bom 24 Dec 1979 


piace Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jan 1988 


i 
~iFALL~1 


Chr. 


Pface 


Endowed 


8 May 1999 


Died 


Pface 


SaaFar 


BIC 


! 


Buried 


Pface 


spouse Amy Lorraine LASHER-14434 




MRIN: 6297 ! 


Mamed 21 Dec 2001 I Pface Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


[ SeaISp 


21 Dec 2001 I IFALL 


M 


Adam Spencer JEPPSON-14435 




Bom 28Jun1982 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


30 Jun 1990 




Chr. 


Pface 


Endowed 
SealPar 


26 May 2001 
BIC 


IFALL 


Died 


Pface 


Buried 


Place 




Spouse Jessica Lee HINTZE-14436 




MRIN: 6298 j 


Mamed 5 Jun 2004 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


| SeaISp 


5 Jun 2004 I IFALL i 



189 



GENE & JILL ROUNDY JEPPSON 

I was born July 13, 1943 to Gerald J. and Maude W. Jeppson at Driggs, Idaho. I have 
three older brothers, Gerald W. (Jerry), Kay Lucien, and Peter Blair. My father ran the cheese 
factory in Driggs. We moved to Rexburg in 1946. The family home was located on the northwest 
comer of 4th South and 4th West. We owned the southwest quarter of that city block. We raised 
a cow, pigs, and chickens. Some of the land was in pasture. We had a large vegetable garden, 
many trees, berry patches, a root cellar, and beautiful flower-beds. Over the years my parents 
sold building lots to Raymond Clements, Ralph Steiner, and "Bud" Hunziker. The livestock was 
gradually eliminated with the cow being the last to go in the '60s. 

Dad operated a Chevron service station Vi block west of our home. Mom was at home 
until I was in school. She had a provisional certificate and had taught school before her marriage. 
She went back to school teaching, first in Madison and then in the Jefferson School District. I 
had several part-time jobs as a youth. I delivered the Post Register; mowed lawns; bagged 
groceries for Dee Sellers at Baldwin's Idaho Food King; was a gofer for Irving Woodmansee at 
the Joy Rexall Drug Store where I swept and mopped the floor, washed windows, got the mail, 
stocked the soda fountain, dusted and faced shelves; and spent Tuesday afternoons one summer 
at the Rexburg Livestock Auction moving livestock from one pen to another. I also did lots of 
jobs for the family in the garden, with the animals, irrigating with ditch water once a week, at 
Dad's station, dusting, vacuuming, washing dishes, and mowing the lawn. 

My social life in the early years consisted of playing with neighbors, Louis Clements, 
Ann Clements, and Doug Yeaman. I remember many Saturday afternoons at the Romance 
Theater watching matinee serials. Later on, my activities were mainly church based. I believe I 
participated in everything that was available. These included the following: Sunday School class 
parties; Primary activities; YM/YW activities; Stake, Regional and All-Church dance festivals; 
Stake, Regional and All-Church softball and basketball tournaments; road-shows; one-act plays; 
youth choir; campouts; scout camp; and a National Scout Jamboree at Valley Forge, 
Pennsylvania. I always enjoyed school. I was able to get fairly good grades without a lot of extra 
effort. My friends at this time were mainly from the ward. They were Ted Erikson, Doug 
Neilson, Theron Anderson, Vaughn Jenkins, Sherwood Ricks, and Tom Fujimoto. In junior high, 
I became good friends with Tom Ikeda and Marvin Jones from Hibbard. In high school I 
participated in lots of activities. I enjoyed playing football and wrestling. I was never very 
athletic but made a contribution and had fun. I had a coach that used me as an example of how he 
wanted the team to hustle. He said that if he dropped the ball on the ground for the team to go 
after, I would get it every time. I was in the band and went on several trips to march in parades 
and at football games. I played the trumpet and later the baritone. I didn't practice a lot and was 
not very proficient. I was in several plays and lots of skits at assemblies. Noon hour was spent 
with a quick lunch and then on to intramurals. My senior year I was a team captain. Shauna 
Andersen, Elaine Agren and I were chosen to read the announcements over the intercom each 
morning. At the annual award assembly my senior year, I was voted the Outstanding Male 
Student by the faculty. I also received the high point award for intramurals. I dated a lot of 
different girls but mainly Cheryl Fisher. She was also my partner in church dance festivals. 

I attended Ricks College for one year and then went on a mission to the Central German 
mission for two and a half years. That was before language training was provided. After my 
mission it was back to Ricks for an associate degree. I then attended BYU for a bachelors degree 
in Business Management. I graduated in August 1968. That final summer at the "Y" I met and 



190 



courted Jill Roundy from Corinne, Utah. She agreed to marry me and we were wed on October 
21, 1968 in the Logan Temple. The Vietnam War was in full swing and I knew I would be 
drafted. I went for my training and Jill stayed in Salt Lake City to teach school. She had taught 
school for two years in Sandy, Utah before we met. 

Our first child, Daniel Gene, was born while I was home on leave before going to 
Vietnam. I was very blessed to obtain an assignment as a clerk in a rear area. I did not have to 
participate in combat actions. Jill and Daniel lived with mom and dad for the year that I was in 
Vietnam. After my release, I spent several months interviewing for positions in the banking 
industry. I took the civil service exam and got a score of 98 out of 100. I received 5 bonus points 
as a veteran and 5 more for a partial disability in my right knee. The Federal Home Loan Bank 
Board was hiring 50 new Savings and Loan examiners. My score placed me at the top of the list. 
I was assigned to Topeka, Kansas. Our second child, Angela was born while we were there. I 
was hired by Safety Federal Savings of Kansas City to open a new branch in Liberty, Missouri. 
We lived in Kearney, Missouri and our next three children, Rachel, Nathan Reese, and Wendy, 
were born there. We decided to move closer to our families in the west. I was hired by First 
Federal Savings & Loan of Idaho Falls to be their Rexburg Branch Manager. Our last two 
children, Joshua Ryan and Adam Spencer, were born there. I was later transferred to the home 
office to be the office manager and do marketing. Since 1984 I have been the Cashiers Office 
Supervisor at Ricks College/Brigham Young University Idaho. 

Church positions have been as follows: Home Teacher, Asst. Explorer Advisor, Home 
Study Seminary Teacher, SS Teacher, Stake Seventy's President, Ward mission leader, Asst. 
High Councilman, Executive Secretary (five different bishops), Asst. Scoutmaster/Deacon's 
Advisor, Varsity Scout Coach, Stake Young Men's President, Cub Master, District Cub Scout 
Roundtable Chairman, Blazer Leader (both Scout Activities and Primary), District Eagle Board 
of Review Chairman, Ward Young Men's President, Ward Clerk, Asst. Ward Clerk (Membership 
and Finance), and Bishop's pt Counselor (2 bishops.) In addition, Jill and I were trained by LDS 
Social Services to teach their Parenting class on a stake level. We taught the course several 
times. We have tried to have family home evening and family prayers. We started early on to 
have a devotional (hymn, prayer, scripture study) five days a week. I think this has had a good 
impact on our family. 

Our three daughters all received their Young Women in Excellence Award. Our four sons 
are all Eagle Scouts. All of our sons served missions. Daniel served in Korea, Seoul West, 
Nathan/Ireland, Dublin, Joshua/Australia, Melbourne West, and Adam/Kentucky Louisville. All 
of our children have been married in the temple. 

Daniel earned his Bachelors and Masters degrees at Utah State (Accounting and 
Information Systems.) He married Monique Cromwell of Idaho Falls and they have five sons. 
They live in Fruit Heights, Utah where he is self-employed as a computer 
consultant/entrepreneur. Angela earned her Bachelors degree at Utah State (Elementary 
Education.) She married Ben Ashcraft of Sugar City and they have three sons and one daughter. 
They live in Hurricane, Utah where Ben is a social worker. Rachel earned an Associates degree 
from Ricks College (Business Education.) She married Michael Guymon of Glendale, Arizona 
and they have two sons and three daughters. They live in Sugar City. Idaho where Mike is a 
social worker for the State of Idaho. Wendy received her Bachelors degree from BYU-ldaho 
(Secondary Education-Biology.) She married Phillip Wallstedt and had one son. They were later 
divorced and she married Ben Thomander of Colorado Springs. They are living in Logan, Utah 
where Ben is working on his Masters degree in Family Counseling. Joshua received his 



191 



Bachelors degree from BYU-Idaho (Pre-professional-Biology.) He married Amy Lasher of 
Fremont, California and they have one son and one daughter. He completed the first year of his 
dental school at Idaho State and they are now living in Omaha, Nebraska where he will complete 
three more years at Creighton University. Adam received his Bachelors degree at BYU-Idaho 
(Information Systems.) He married Jessica Hintze of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. They are living 
in Salt Lake City where he is working for his brother Daniel. 




L. Gene & Jill R. Jeppson & Children 
August 2004 

Front Row: Joshua Ryan, Daniel Gene, Leslie Gene, Jill R., Nathan Rees, Adam 

Spencer 

Back Row: Angela Jeppson Ashcraft, Rachel Jeppson Guymon, Wendy Jeppson 

Thomander 



192 



MISSIONARY DESCENDANTS OF GERALD AND MAUDE JEPPSON 

Sons: 

Gerald W. Jeppson California 

Leslie Gene Jeppson Central Germany 



Grand Children: 

Gerald W.: 

Gerald Paul Jeppson 
Melvin Terry Jeppson 
John Duanc Jeppson 



Chile Concepcion/Orsono 
Pennsylvania, Pittsburg 
Canada, Vancouver 



Joseph Charles Jeppson Switzerland, Geneve 



Kay Lucein: 

James Kay Jeppson 
Steven Robert Jeppson 
Jana Jeppson 

Peter Blair: 

Gerald Blair Jeppson 
Alan Trent Jeppson 
Leslie Ann Jeppson 
Julee Jeppson 
Jared Lynn Jeppson 

Leslie Gene: 

Daniel Gene Jeppson 
Nathan Rees Jeppson 
Joshua Ryan Jeppson 
Adam Spencer Jeppson 

Great-Grandchildren: 
Michael Jeppson 
Caleb Mills 
Trenton Jeppson 
Colter Seth 
Gerald Ryan Jeppson 
John David Jeppson 

Couples: 

Gerald W. And Joan 



Peter Blair and Lola 

Gene and Jill 



Portland 
West Virginia 
California, San Diego 



Ohio, Columbus 
New York, Rochester 
Dominican Republic 
Ohio, Columbus 
Argentina 



Korea, Seoul West 

Ireland 

Australia, Melborne West 

Kentucky 



Florida, Jacksonville 
Australia, Melborne 
Georgia, Atlanta 
South Pacific, Pohnepie 

Chile, Vina del Mar 

Wisconsin, Millwaukee (Spanish Speaking) 



Greece, Athens 

BYU-Idaho part-time Service Mission 
Family History Center, 4.5 years 
(2) Kentucky and Tennessee, Nashville 
Germany 



193 



Family Group Record- 1319 




Page 1 of 1 


Husband Robert UrseH WEEKES-61 1 7 


Bom 7 Sep 1907 jPtace Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


!Chr ! Place 


Baptized 4 Aug 1916 


SLAKE 

i ----- 


joied 30 Jul 198SLI Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Jdaho 

i Buried J Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 12 Mar 1930 

SealPar B1C 


I Married Place 


SeaISp 


— i 


; Husband-s father John Samuel WEEKES-777 mrin: 1721 I 


i Husbands mother Ida Isabel GROVER-6308 .._ J 


wife unmarried 


! Bom j Place 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


j Chr. j Place 


Baptized 


Died Place 


Endowed 


j Buried j Place 


SealPar 


Wife's father 


j Wife's mother 



Carl Nykamp 
208-523-7378_ 



E-maii address cad@srv.myrf.net 

D ate prepar ed 24 Jul 2005 



Address 14054 N. 65 



Idaho Falls Jdaho__834Q1 



United States Of America 



194 




Above: Elder Ursel Weekes, 
(2 n from left) serving in the 
Kentucky, Virginia, Mission. 
(March 1930 -April 1832) 
Right: Ursel Weekes standing 
by his home in Archer, Idaho 
Below: Elder Ursel Weekes 




195 



ROBERT URSEL WEEKES 

I was born on the 7 th of September, 1907, at Archer, Fremont County, Idaho. I was the 
fifth child of John Samuel Weekes and Ida Isabel Grover. I was blessed as an infant on the 6 th of 
October, 1907, at Archer Ward by my grandfather, Sidney Weekes. My baptism was on the 4 th 
of August 1916, under the hands of Wayne L. Cheney. Edward P. Oldham confirmed me on the 
6 th of August, 1916. 

My father and granddad were farmers. I grew up helping, first with easy smaller chores, 
and gradually taking over the larger ones. Milking cows is one chore I have done as long as I 
can remember. The folks had chickens and sheep as well as cows. For ten or fifteen years we 
had 300 to 400 chickens. Then, also for a number of years we had about 125 sheep. In 1938, Pa 
was selling the lambs. They were to be shipped on the railroad to Denver, Colorado, along with 
several hundred head of Blakely's sheep. Warren and Lawrence Blakely were accompanying the 
sheep and wanted me to go along too. So in November, I rode on the train from Ririe, Idaho to 
Denver, Colorado, with the sheep. With Blakely's and our sheep, we had three train cars full, 
with each car having three decks of sheep. 

Farm crops have included alfalfa, spuds and grain as the standards. But also, we raised 
sugar beets and peas. For a number of years we raised red clover for seed and one year it was 
radishes, which we threshed for the seed. We farmed with horses until Pa bought his first tractor. 
That was a four-wheel drive Power Horse. Using horses, it was hard to always get everything 
done on time. So we sometimes hired someone to come and do some of the plowing so we could 
catch up. 

I remember living in the old log house before the new home was built in 1912. In 
addition to the regular chores of chopping wood, drawing water, farming etc., a couple of 
incidents stand out in my mind. I was riding Old Joe (the family horse) in 1915 or 1916. We 
were going down through the pig pasture. Old Joe stepped in a hole, which had been made by 
the rooting pigs, and fell, and I was injured. Lyman took me to Rexburg to the doctor in a one- 
horse, blacktopped buggy. My collarbone was cracked. 

Uncle Harry Munns lived on the dry farm. I remember going up to his place with Leslie 
on a sled to get a calf. There was snow everywhere, lots of it. 

In the spring of 1917 I worked with Leslie on the dry farm. I had Dick, Jess and Bawly 
(horses) on the sulky plow, and Leslie had six head on the gangplow. We were summer 
fallowing some of the land. 

One year during the haying season, Cyril Weekes, Dad's half-brother, came to get me to 
help. I was to run the derrick horses at my grandfather's. This was before Cyril was married and 
was still living at home. I was quite young. I must have done a good job because Cyril 
remembered the incident and mentioned it just before he died in 1969. 

As a young man my chums were Sam Grover, Ethan Young, Eugene Erickson, Alvin 
Erickson and Henry Erickson. Sunday afternoons usually found us congregated at the Erickson 
home. We enjoyed going to the get-togethers and dances held both at Archer and Riverside 
Gardens (between Lorenzo and Rigby) 

I completed grades 1 through 6 at Archer. We drove down in a sleigh in the winter, 
picking up Blackburn's and others on the way down. Then it was decided that we were living in 
the Sunnydell District, so we should go to school at Sunnydell. So grades 7 th and 8 th were spent 
there. Selar Cheney was my 7 th grade teacher and Olin Jeppson was my 8 th . I attended 9 th and 
10th grades at Archer School. John L. Eames taught both those grades. I finished high school in 



196 



Rexburg at Ricks Academy, graduating June 1, 1928. Also in my graduating class were Ann 
Jeppson, Opal Weekes (Clements), Agnes Grover (Orr), Myrtle Wilcox (Kennington), and Nina 
Clements (Ricks - Keith's sister). 

Church attendance and church work has always played an important part in my life. 
I was planning on leaving for my mission in January 1930, when it was found I needed 
my goiter removed. After Dr. Hatch did that I left home in March 1930 for the East Central 
Mission. 1 received my endowments March 12, 1930, in the Salt Lake Temple. Although the 
mission headquarters were in Kentucky, I spent the entire 25 months of my mission in one 
district which included two counties of West Virginia and the western half of Maryland. The 
people we tracked among and taught were poor, uneducated typical Ozark Hill people. 

Except for my mission and the trip to Denver with the sheep in 1938, I really haven't 
been out of the Snake River Valley around Rexburg, Idaho. I still have a booklet autographed by 
Heber J. Grant, which he sent to each of the missionaries. It's called Up From the Hills , and is 
about a young boy struggling against and overcoming overwhelming difficulties. 

After returning home from my mission in April 1932, I again helped with the farming at 
home. Help was needed and I was expected to do my part. I've held several church positions. 
In 1938, Brother Rawls was the Sunnydell Sunday School Superintendent. Cyril Weekes and I 
were his counselors. In 1942, Keith Clements became the Superintendent and I was his first 
counselor. Cyril and I were also counselors to Myron Jeppson when he was Elder's Quorum 
President. I spent several years as the chairman of ward teaching. Again Cyril and I worked 
together as companions through our stake missions for the Rexburg Stake. We were called on 
February 1, 1948, and served for two years. 

Patriarch, Andrew J. Hansen gave me my patriarchal blessing on December 6, 1926, just 
prior to my going on my mission. He declared my lineage to be that of Ephraim. 

In 1951 I had my sinuses operated on, and on December 17, 1975, 1 had a prostate gland 
operation. Years earlier, in 1942, I was working on the power horse when it flipped over 
backwards. I was astraddle a chain, so I couldn't jump out of the way. The exhaust hit my leg, 
badly burning it and tearing flesh. I still have the scars of that accident. 

I've usually had a dog to help with cattle, etc. Through the years I've usually had 30 to 
40 head of cows, some to milk and some just raising calves. In 1953 I bought 40 acres, a home 
and shop from Newell Piquet, and in 1956 I bought another 20 acres from my Dad's land. 
Altogether, that gives me 1 19 acres of land, 99 of which is farming ground. 

I lived in the home place until the spring of 1948. I left there to live with Bertha and her 
family. Bertha's husband, Olin Jeppson, had passed away. I've lived there until the present 
time. 

Even though I've been blessed with good health and exceptional strength, I try to find the 
easy way to do a job. Levers and machinery are usually used to prevent injury to back, etc. 

Eventually he moved into the home he bought from Newell & Madonna Piquet in 1953, 
and lived there several years. When his health got bad, he lived with his sisters. Opal provided 
most of the care. On July 30, 1988 he passed away. He is buried in the Archer Sutton Cemetery. 

This history was written by Ursel Weekes on July 10, 1978. 
Last Paragraph added for this publication 



197 



Family Group Record- 2127 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband 


Cecil Keith CLEMENTS-6259 




... 1 


| Bom 


19 Mar 1911 Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


[chr. 
Died 


l Place 


Baptized 10 May 1919 


5 May 1994 Place Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 10 Dec 1941 


SLAKE I 


Buned 


9 Mav 1994 ! Place Archer, Madison. Idaho, USA 


SealPar BIC 


Married 


10 Dec 1941 Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


Seaisp 10 Dec 1941 


SLAKE 


Husbands father Cecil Thomas CLEMENTS- 1 3828 




MRIN 6034 


Husband 


s mother Minnie Irene ANDERSON-1 3829 


Wife 


Nora Opal WEEKES-61 18 






Bom 


17 Jan 1910 Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr 


Place i 


Baptized 6JuM918[ 




Died 


1 May 1994 J Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 

5 Mav 1994 p,ace Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 31 May 1940 ' 


SLAKE I 


Buried 


SealPar BIC 


i 


wifes father John Samuel WEEKES-777 




MRIN: 1721 


wife's mother Ida Isabel GROVER-6308 






Opal Weekes will leave Satur- 
day to visit over night with 
friends in Swan Valley where she 
taught school for two years. 

k Miss Opal Weekes, first grade 
teacher, has returned home from a 
short term mission to the eastern 
states, and will resume teaching here 
next week in the elementary school. 

May 1st. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Weekes and 
daughters, Opal and Alta Weekes 
spent Sunday as guests at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Jeppson of 
Driggs. Sunday afternoon they at- 
tended the quarterly conference of 
the Teton stake. 



Keith and Opal Weekes 
Clements 




198 




Married in Salt Lake Temple 
December 10, 1041 



Keith AHt> Opal Clements 

Golden Wcbfcing Anniversary 

10 December 19*>i 



199 




Left: Opal & Keith 
Clements 

Left back: Rex Larsen, 
Alden & Gail Brindle 
Opal, Shauna Murray, 
Keith, Carl Nykamp, 
Front: Joyce & Danna 
Larsen, Lee, Joan & 
Ryan Nykamp, John 
Murray. 

Below: Keith & Opal 
at their home in Teton 
Basin 



" ' » rw i » i i \ mm i m mmm*mmm*m*fq^ 




200 



OPAL WEEKES & KEITH CLEMENTS 

I, Opal Weekes Clements, daughter of John and Ida Grover Weeks, was born January 17, 
1910, at Sunnydell, Madison County. Idaho. 

I was the eighth child in a family of eleven children. There were three girls older than I 
and three younger. I felt it was a favored place, that of middle daughter, since I felt close to 
those older and a big sister to the younger ones. We were blessed with exceptionally good 
parents who taught us to love work and responsibility. I have only a few memories of my two 
older brothers who passed away when I was young. John Samuel passed away as a young child, 
before I was born. My parents, John and Ida, owned a large farm. We lived in a large white 
frame house. The six months of my childhood from January until July of 1918 seemed a never 
ending period. I felt almost disgraced because I couldn't take sacrament until I was baptized in 
July, when water in the canal was warm enough for baptism. July 6 was the first baptism date of 
the season. Several children and two women were baptized that day. Brother Thomas Jeppson 
did the baptizing. I remember very well being confirmed the next day, Sunday, by Brother Olaf 
P. Johanason. 

I attended school both at Sunnydell and Archer. When the weather was suitable, we 
walked. If it wasn't, Ursel drove a team or someone else took us in a buggy or sleigh. Often, we 
rode horses. I enjoyed school and most of my teachers were favorites. 

My childhood days were happy days. I was healthy and busy. I am grateful for mother's 
kind, tender loving care which was over us constantly. She always wanted to know where we 
were and what we were doing. Conditions for leisure time activities were ideal at home. We had 
good books and the church magazines and were encouraged to read them. We had a large swing 
and many happy hours were spent in it. Old Joe, our small black pony was a trusty servant. He 
was loyal to the children and much needed for herding cows and taking them to and from the 
pasture. Each day we used him to take and bring mail from the post office, which was about a 
mile away. Countless trips were made to the store on the hill east of our home or the one further 
away in Archer. I used to ride him to and from the blacksmith shop taking plow points to get 
them sharpened, or other pieces that needed repair work done. I don't know how we could have 
lived without Old Joe and the other horses we rode. 

At an early age, I worked in the garden and berries, helped to weed, thin beets and 
potatoes and rode the horse when Father cultivated the garden and berries. As I think back over 
my childhood days, I spent considerable time with Father turning the grind stone, while he 
sharpened mower knives or shovels, holding sacks while he sacked grain for market or feed, 
going with him when he went to make or fix fence so I could run errands for him. He talked 
freely and he was so kind to me. I loved to be with him. Today, I admire him for his patience 
and understanding. He often let us ride one of the horses he was driving on a piece of 
equipment. When I was young, I was riding on one of the center horses of his binder team. One 
of the outside horses rubbed against my foot, pulling my sandal off and allowing it to drop to the 
ground, before I could reach it. The binder was such a noisy piece that I couldn't attract father's 
attention. Childish judgment convinced me I could mark the spot and find it later, when we 
stopped. We looked and looked but never could find it. I felt really bad because it was one of 
the very few sandals I ever wore. Usually we had shoes for everyday that came six or eight 
inches above the ankle. 

I did some cooking, many dishes and much cleaning. I also helped with the washing 
before we had a washing machine. We scrubbed the clothes on a washboard by hand. There 



201 



were girls enough that we usually had a co-worker using a tub and board beside us, since clothes 
had to have a first and second washing, be boiled, rinsed, blued and starched before they were 
pinned on the line to dry. We made a hot fire in the cook stove, put the irons on the front lids of 
the stove to heat, brought the ironing board, iron handle and a bushel basket of clothes when they 
were ready to iron and began to iron. There were large washings and ironings for a family the 
size of ours. 

Picnics and huckleberrying trips were events we looked forward to with much delight and 
anticipation. Travel during my childhood to such events was by horse and buggy. We children 
took turns riding the pony. Monday was the day for preparation, cooking, baking and packing. 
It required several changes of clothes for each, since we stayed for several days. Mother was an 
excellent cook. She and the girls did the cooking over the camp fire. Food never tasted so good! 
Chicken dinners, potatoes, hot bread and often huckleberry shortcake, all made in dutch ovens, 
were most tempting. The large bonfires, singing by the group and programs in the evenings, 
were most enjoyable. 

Even our pine beds felt good to tired bodies after the activity of the day. They were made 
by clearing the ground and arranging boughs into mattresses. Then a canvas and heavy quilts, 
blankets and more quilts over top. Sometimes a bed for us girls extended from one side of the 
tent to the other. We were so snug and warm. 

Father scouted around to find berries. He was very apt at that. We walked to those that 
were near and rode horses to patches farther away. Huckleberries were always a temptation to 
me. I loved to eat them as I picked. 

I felt really grown up to be a sophomore, ready to go to 3 or 4 years at Ricks College. 
Ursel, Agnes and I stayed at Bother Arthur Porter's, west of the RR tracks. 
We batched in the upstairs apartment. The next year, Ursel and I stayed at Joseph Parkinson's, 
just one half block east of Ricks College with Leo and Rhea Williams. 

Father or Brother Jeppson usually took us, Ann and Alice to Rexburg in the white top 
buggy on Sunday afternoons. It was a long trip from Sunnydell to Rexburg. In the winter we 
traveled in the sleigh using lap robes and heavy clothes to keep warm. 

I graduated from high school at Ricks College in 1928 and took two years of college 
work, graduating in 1930. I taught school from 1930 to 1933 at Tetonia, 1933-1935 at Hibbard, 
Madison County, 1936 to 1938 at Swan Lake, Bannock County, 1938-1941 at Rigby, Jefferson 
County. I filled a short term mission for the LDS Church in the Eastern States Mission. 

Due to mother's health, I decided to teach first & second grades in Madison County so I 
could spend time in her behalf. For the next three years I taught at Hibbard. This was an 
enjoyable experience. In a very unexpected way I met Keith. I boarded at the home of Brother 
and Sister Joseph E. Rigby and Keith worked for the Bishop. During the winter and early spring, 
Sister Rigby was counselor in the Relief Society and often had a quilt on. One evening she 
invited Viola to help finish one saying, "Opal can take you home when you need to go." I drove 
the Rigby' s car often, but dreaded parking in the garage. There was only an inch to spare on 
either side. Sister Rigby invited Keith to accompany me and I invited him to park in the garage. 
This was our first evening out together. I married Cecil Keith Clements on December 10, 1941, 
in the Salt Lake Temple. We purchased the Ben Hillman home in Sunnydell and have lived 
there ever since. 

Keith and I have had a very happy life together. We've worked harmoniously together, 
enjoying many of the same interests in life and our leisure time has also been spent together. 



202 



Our church activity and illness of a loved one or someone in need are the only things that have 
caused us to go different ways. We've attended the temple regularly and enjoyed it immensely. 

The children loved to go to Aunt Opal & Uncle Keith's home. They loved her bread, 
liberally spread with honey, the treasure hunts, rides with her and Uncle Keith to the basin to 
tend the cows, the picnics and hot dog roasts and rolling down the front lawn with Gretchen 
barking. They knew she loved them, because they got to help her work in the house or the yard 
or out in the field. She taught them the value of work and praised them generously when they 
earned it. 

When we didn't walk on the hill, we would go down to the railroad tracks and walk on 
the tracks to the bridge. This was a great walk too. It was a challenge to see who could stay on 
the rails the longest and walk the fastest to get to the bridge, which crossed the Snake River. 
Then there was the great swing that went out over the water. Many of the nieces, nephews, 
scouts, etc., loved the swing. 

Aunt Opal was known for her flower gardens. They were large, colorful and beautiful. 
She gave starts to everyone and you could never see where they came from. They were carefully 
weeded and so beautiful. She always had flowers to take to the cemetery on Memorial Day. We 
would help put the arrangements together and then take them to the cemetery. That was truly 
one of her favorite days. 

Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith were always careful not to waste. They made certain that 
their many fruit trees were always harvested and the fruit delivered to anyone who might need it. 
They were always generous. Not only did they deliver fruit to be canned, but for those who had 
little children, were sick or really busy. Aunt Opal would go ahead and can the fruit and 
vegetable and deliver them ready to store or eat. 

Uncle Keith loved his horses. He spent a great deal of time riding down the field to 
check the water or up on the hill checking the cows. Aunt Opal would ride with him or down to 
check on him in the field. They did everything together. Uncle Keith and Aunt Opal were great 
note writers. One was always letting the other know where they were or what they were doing in 
a simple little note. Aunt Opal was always serving and helping others. Uncle Keith didn't 
complain about her absence but supported her totally, helping her haul things here and there and 
setting up primary carnivals or bazaars. Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith were great home teachers 
and visiting teachers. They were totally dedicated to the people they were assigned to, as well as 
many others who were ill or lonely in the neighborhood. Aunt Opal could tell you everything 
that was going on in the neighborhood and extended family of hers or Uncle Keith's. She wrote 
notes by the hundreds and made phone calls constantly to check on everyone to see how they 
were doing. They had no children of their own, so they took on the children and families of all 
they came in contact with. Aunt Opal had the wonderful knack of making you think she loved 
you best. 

Uncle Keith loved word puzzles. Very often, he would come in a after a long day's work 
and do the Post Register word puzzle. He had a keen mind and loved mind teasers. He too. 
never let his mind go to waste. He was almost impossible to beat at checkers. He knew every 
move and kept track of all of his opponent's moves. However, he was kind and patient. He 
loved to see all the kids do well and tried to teach all of us to play the game well. He always had 
a little trick to show the children and would get a kick out of the fascination of kids. He loved to 
entertain them inside and out. Uncle Keith and Aunt Opal were truly a team who made company 
feel welcome. They truly had plenty of company. Aunt Opal always fed you. I don't remember 
ever going there without being offered a meal or dessert. 



203 



Opal stood up for what she knew was right. She loved the gospel, and there was no room 
in her life for rationalization. If it was right, it was right! She loved to share the gospel with 
others. Opal accepted any church calling that came. She served for many years as President of 
the Primary and the Relief Society. I don't think we could even guess how many thousands of 
hours of service she has given to people in need. Somehow, she could go into a home with her 
arms loaded down with hamburger stew, homemade bread, and raisin filled cookies, and whisk 
away the washing and the extra kids with never a raised eyebrow for the dishes in the sink or the 
unswept floor. 

Aunt Opal always helped when there was a new baby. She would come and bring meals, 
take care of the other children, do laundry and cleaning, anything she could do to help. She 
never overstepped her bounds. Uncle Keith supported her in all she did. He never seemed to 
complain about the time she spent taking care of children, reading stories like Buster, teaching 
them everything she knew. Her life was busy. She never wasted a minute that could be spent 
aiding a good cause. 

Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith were always there when a new missionary went through the 
temple, at reports, blessings of new babies, at baptisms, weddings and funerals. They have been 
extremely generous with their means and have helped many, many missionaries and students 
with their finances. 

Ricks College announced this: Keith and Opal Weekes Clements of Sunnydell have been 
honored by Ricks College for outstanding contributions to assist students at Ricks. They have 
funded two endowments for student scholarships at Ricks. One scholarship was created in honor 
of Mrs. Clements' parents, John and Ida Weekes, while the other is given in the name of Mr. 
Clements" parents, Cecil and Irene Clements. 

Uncle Keith and Aunt Opal rarely did anything for themselves. They always gave to 
others. They loved to take trips to the park and stay overnight in their camper. They never 
stayed long, but would take a day and fish and enjoy each other's company. They loved to take 
children with them and entertained them along the way. It was always fun to go with them 
because they had treats, stories and games along the way. 

Opal was an active member of the DUP for many years. She kept books of genealogy, 
and gave away copies of histories and pictures and family lines to all the relatives. She kept us 
all in touch with each other. 

Both of them were avid genealogists. They spent a great deal of time researching names 
and putting together scrapbooks and genealogy books. Aunt Opal spent a great deal of time with 
us teaching us how to fill out our genealogy sheets and helping us find an interest in the work. 
She constantly taught of the importance of the temple work and keeping the commandments so 
that we could be worthy to go there. They both had very strong testimonies and weren't afraid to 
share them wherever they went. They were a strength to everyone they knew. They spent a 
great deal of time in the temple. Aunt Opal worked for some time in the nursery. As I 
remember, Uncle Keith did endowments while she accomplished this. They would almost 
always go to the Temple one day a week and do several endowments. 

Keith and Opal had Spanish families who came from Texas each year to thin beets and 
work on the farm during the summer. 

The Gutierrez family came for several years and became life-long friends. Agustin, the 
oldest son, spoke English and served as the interpreter. 

In the Spring of 1955, Agustin married Connie Salazer in Texas and brought his new 
bride to Idaho. 



204 



Keith and Opal were always kind to them and helped with their needs. Five years later 
they were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They were sealed in the 
temple and eventually served a mission in Equador at the Temple. 

They are active in the church and have raised a wonderful family in this area. Much 
credit is given to Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith for the influence they had in their lives as they 
shared the gospel. 

The full-time mission Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith served, in Barron, Wisconsin, was the 
highlight of their lives. 

What a wonderful example they have been to everyone they knew. Opal had a special 
way of making everyone feel they were the most important person in her life. 

This book would have been impossible to publish if Aunt Opal had not collected, written 
and researched for countless hours. We thank them for the great example they have been. 

Compiled by Joan Nykamp from Aunt OpaPs autobiography, Cherrie Allen's memories and 
Nikki Nelson's life sketch. 






Opal Weekes and Keith Clements 



205 



AGUSTIN & CANDIDA GUTIERREZ FAMILY 

Each summer for many years Keith & Opal hired the Gutierrez family and other Spanish 
families from Texas to help on the farm. They thinned beets as a family. After spending several 
years migrating back and forth between the Upper Snake River Valley and Texas, Connie & 
Agustin settled permanently in Newdale in 1958. Eventually they built a nice brick home just 
off main street near Highway 20. 

Agustin spoke English and over time they became very good friends. Keith and Opal 
were attentive as their children came along and supported important family events. Opal made 
baby blankets and quilts for their children. The Gutierrez family made frequent visits to the 
Clements'' home. 

Opal kept their family history records among all the family records of her nieces and 
nephews and their children. 

It was stated "Keith and Opal Clements of Sunnydell, who he first worked for in 1951, 
are nearly as close as parents." Mr. Gutierrez says, "My kids call them Grandma and Grandpa." 

Therefore, we will share a little of their family history, knowing how influential Opal and 
Keith were in their lives. How happy and proud Opal and Keith were of the Gutierrez family. 

Agustin Guiterrez was born in 1935 at Dr. Gonzalez, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. His parents 
were Sasario and Juana Gutierrez. Agustin and his family were made citizens of the United 
States when he was sixteen years old. He is the oldest often children, having three brothers and 
six sisters. He and his family would migrate from state to state to work, and Agustin would act 
as chauffer and interpreter for his parents. 

Candida Salazar Gutierrez was born in 1938 at the home of her parents in San Benito, 
Texas. Her parents were Victor and Leonor Salazar. Candida's mother passed away when she 
was nine years old. Her maternal grandparents, Teodulo and Josefa Enriquez, took her and her 
three brothers into their home and raised them as their own. 

Agustin and Candida were married on April 24, 1955 in Pharr, Texas. Agustin brought 
his bride to Idaho to live and started their married life in Newdale. Agustin worked for Keith 
Clements and later for Klingler Brothers. He worked as foreman for 19 years and he is now self- 
employed, working as a seed broker. They also own a country store and cafe. 

Agustin and Candida were converted to the gospel in 1 960 and were sealed in the temple 
on March 31, 1966. They have been active in the Church since their conversion. He and 
Candida started working in the temple as officiators in 1984. Agustin was made supervisor for 
the Spanish speaking session and one year later he was set apart by Gordon B. Hinckley as a 
sealer. Candida has served as an assistant supervisor at the Idaho Falls Temple. Connie and 
Agustin were called to serve a full time mission at the Temple in Equador. 

Ricks College honors Newdale Family: The Agustin and Candida Gutierrez family of 
Newdale have been honored as the exemplary family of the year by the Ricks College family 
science department. 

Each year, the department recognizes a family, which portrays exemplary lives in work, 
spirituality, love and service. 

Mr. & Mrs. Gutierrez have exhibited those qualities as they performed various duties in a 
Spanish speaking ward of the LDS Church. He's serving now as a priesthood and Sunday 
School teacher and she's served as a Relief Society president. They also have served as stake 
missionaries for the church. 



206 



The LDS Church is central to their lives. Eager to tell others how strongly he believes in 
the church, Agustin says, " If you're really a Mormon, you're a happy man." 

All of their married children have been married in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple and 
several have attended Ricks College. 




Agustin & Connie Gutierrez Family 
Back: Gilbert, Latezia, Jared, Belinda, Leon Front: Rosita, Connie, Agustin, Shanna 



207 



Family Group Record- 2128 

















Page 1 of 1 


Husband 


Lvnn Lerov RANDALL-6260 








Bom 


11 Feb 1914 j Place Burley, Cassia, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


2 Nov 1914 | Place Pella Ward, Cassia, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1922 


i 


I 

i 


Died 


7 Aug 1999 ! Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


9 Auq 1939 


SLAKE ! 


j 


Buried 


14 Auq 1999 ! Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


Married 


9 Auq 1939 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


9 Auq 1939! SLAKE 






Husband 


s father Homer Anson RAN DALL-1 3494 




MRIN: 5907 ! 






Husband's mother Annie WESTERGARD-1 3495 








Wife 


Eldora Pearl WEEKES-61 19 




i 






Bom 


7 Oct 1912 j Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


1 Dec 1912 Place Sunnydell, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


16 Jul 1921 


I 


I 

I 


Died 


31 Jul 1999 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


9 Auq 1939 


SLAKE | 




Buried 


7 Auq 1999 i Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC I 




I 


wife's father John Samuel WEEKES-777 




MRIN: 1721 I 


1 


I wife's mother Ida Isabel GROVER-6308 




I 


Children 


List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


F i De Ann RANDALL-1 


0422 




Bom 


25 Sep 1941 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


24 Sep 1949 j 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


8 Feb 1964 | SLAKE 


I 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC i 


I 

I 


Buried 


Place 




Spouse 


Richard P. SCHUIF-10425 




MRIN: 4142 


2 




Married 


14 Feb 1963 ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


14 Feb 19631 SLAKE 


M 


Dale 


Lynn RANDALL-1 0423 








Bom 


11 Jun1944 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1952 | 




Chr. 


6 Auq 1944 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


3 Auq 1963 IFALL 




Died 


31 Auq 1977 


Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried 


3SeDl977 


Place Briqham Citv. Utah 


I 


Spouse 


Carol Jean HOLYOAK-10426 




MRIN: 4143 


3 




Married 


5 Jun 1968 ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


5 Jun 1968 I SLAKE 


M 


Howard Leroy RANDALL-1 0424 




Bom 


11 Feb 1950 J Place Riqbv. Jefferson. Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Mar 1958 j 


i 


Chr. 


2 Apr 1950 ! Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


15 Feb 1969 SLAKE 


i 
i 


Died 


! Place 


SealPar 


Q\C 


j 


Buried 


j Place 






Spouse 


Patricia JEPPSON-10427 




MRIN: 4144 | 






Married 


24 Apr 1973 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Apr 19731 SLAKE ! 



208 13 Feb 2006 






RAN DALLS 

Lynn Eldora DeAnn Dale Howard 







DeAnn 



Dale 



Howard 



209 




210 



ELDORA PEARL WEEKES & LYNN LEROY RANDALL 

I was born, October 7, 1912, in Sunnydell, Idaho. I too, like Nephi of old was born of 
goodly parents. My father, John Samuel Weekes was born September 8, 1873, in Smithfield, 
Utah, at 245 W. 2 n S. to Sidney and Susan E. Pilgrim Weekes. He was the fifth child in a family 
of six, having two brothers and three sisters. My mother, Ida Isabel Grover Weekes was born 
April 13, 1974, to Marshall Hubbard Grover and Isabel Orr. She was the second child in a 
family of thirteen, having one sister and eleven brothers. 

Eleven special spirits came to bless their home; four sons and seven daughters. I, being 
the ninth child and fifth daughter, the only blond baby, put in my appearance at 6:30 a.m. on a 
beautiful fall morning, October 7, 1912, (and Eve been getting up early ever since) at Sunnydell, 
Fremont County, Idaho. 

At this time, my father was 39 years old and a farmer. Mother was 38 years old and a 
wonderful companion and helpmate, making everyone welcome who stopped in. She always 
had a well kept garden and a yard full of fruits and beautiful flowers of all kinds. She always 
had a basket of fruit, produce or a loaf of fresh homemade bread for anyone who stopped for a 
visit. Her motto was "you never miss what you give away". 

I was blessed on December 1, 1912. I was named after Eldora Pearl Lewis. She was a 
very pretty and talented young school teacher who taught school at Sunnydell at that time. 

I was baptized on July 17, 1921, in a big canal that ran through our bishop's field. I was so 
afraid of the deep, cold water, but it was a wonderful experience to become a member of The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. We were taught early in life that we should be in 
church every Sunday. Our parents took us, setting a good example for us to follow. 

On September 6, 1985, while we were attending a funeral of my brother-in-law, George 
Nelson at Archer, we visited with Roy Gardner, a long-time neighbor of my parents. I asked him 
if he remembered me. He replied, "I'll say I do. You are John Weekes' little blond girl who 
herded cows for so many years on a black pony". It makes me tired just to think of those long, 
hot summer days. 

I learned to value the joy of a job well done when in the seventh grade. I started working 
in a country store for a little English lady, Mrs. Mahue. I found it very interesting, challenging 
and educational. Later, while attending Madison High School, I had the opportunity of working 
at the Rexburg Mart (department store) and was able to buy all of my own clothes. 

I didn't enjoy my freshman year at Madison. It seemed so big after graduating from a one 
room school at Sunnydell with a class of five. I made a lot of new friends, was in the school 
operas and sang in a sextet. I enjoyed the following three years. I graduated from seminary in 
my junior year. 

After graduating from Madison High, I worked at the Rexburg Mart until it closed. Then I 
worked for CM. Hatch Company at Driggs, staying with Maude and Gerald. I really did 
appreciate the many things they did for me. Gerald even chose the boy friends I should go with. 

I taught the second year Beehive girls and had a Sunday School class which I enjoyed very 
much and sang in the ward choir which was a lot of fun. I got tired of the long cold winters and 
returned to Rexburg to work at J.C. Penney Company, part-time. I soon transferred to Rigby and 
worked fulltime as manager of the piece goods department for three years. 

In the fall of 1937, 1 met Lynn Randall. It was love at first sight for both of us. We dated 
for over a year and on Valentines Day 1939 he gave me my diamond. We were married August 
9, 1939, in the Salt Lake Temple by Apostle George F. Richards. We were the 37 th couple to be 
sealed that day. 



211 



Lynn was born February 11, 1914 at Burley, Idaho. After we were married, he was 
employed by the Idaho State Department of Law Enforcement. The next two years we lived in 
Driggs, Arco, Twin Falls, Blackfoot and his last assignment was in Pocatello. 

While at Arco, I taught the Blue Bird girls in primary and Lynn was the Scout Master. In 
addition to his police work, he visited the schools in Butte, Custer and Lemhi Counties, teaching 
classes in first aid, traffic and firearm safety. 

We lived in apartments and motels and ate many of our meals in cafes. We became so 
tired of cafe food, we don't like it to this day. 

After his assignment at Pocatello, we moved to Rexburg where Lynn was employed by 
C.W.& N. Farm Machine Company. 

While in Rexburg, we were blessed with our first child. DeAnn was born on September 
25, 1941. She was a beautiful baby with curly hair, fair skin and pretty blue eyes. She had a 
perfect strong body. We were so thankful to our Heavenly Father for our special blessing (I 
being 30 years of age). 

Lynn was called to be the First Counselor in the Elders Quorum Presidency in the Rexburg 
First Ward. At this time, we decided to work for ourselves. We had an opportunity to buy forty 
acres from my father, located in Archer, Idaho. The land had no buildings or house on it. 
Maude and Gerald told us we could live in the two room log house on their farm which joined 
our land. The house hadn't been lived in for several years and needed a lot of repair work and 
cleaning. Elbow grease and soap was something we had plenty of. We soon had it nice and 
clean and ready to move into. We enjoyed our stay in Archer. 

Two years later, DeAnn came down with rheumatic fever. We took her to a child 
specialist in Pocatello. He advised us to keep her quiet and not let her be on her feet. Keeping a 
two and a half year old quiet was a very difficult task. One of us held her, rocked her or played 
with her on the bed constantly. Lynn was busy farming and the care for her sometimes seemed 
more than I could do, but with the help of our Father in Heaven and Lynn's mother, we 
managed. She had no heart damage. She grew to be strong and healthy. We are so grateful to 
our Heavenly Father for this blessing. 

While living in Archer we were blessed with another special spirit, a son. Dale was born 
on a beautiful summer morning, June 11, 1944, at the Rexburg Maternity Home. He had hazel 
eyes. He didn't have much hair, but when it came in, it was nice and thick and a curly light 
brown. He was a good natured baby, always happy and easy to care for. 

A year later after the crops were harvested, Lynn found work in Pocatello. He had board 
and room with his brother Lawrence and his wife. He worked 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. as a mechanic in 
the Railroad Shop. From 4:30 P.M. to 12:30 A.M. he worked at the Pocatello Flour Mill. The 
wages were good and with a boost in our income, we were able to finish paying father for our 
farm and buy a nice team of horses. It was a lonely, hard winter. I stayed at home. I had Enid 
Clay stay nights to tend the children while I milked the cows and fed the pigs, calves etc. I 
always got up early to get the chores done before she caught the school bus in the morning. If 
Lynn didn't have to work overtime on weekends, he would come home and do things that 
needed done, then catch the Greyhound Bus in Rigby at midnight Sunday to be at work early 
Monday morning. 

A year later in 1945, we sold the farm in Archer and bought a nice 40 acre farm, five 
miles east of Idaho Falls. It had a lovely home and out buildings, with a white picket fence 
around the house and yard. 



212 



Howard was born February 1 1, 1950, on his father's birthday, at 4:30 a.m. in the Rigby 
Maternity Home. It was a cold winter night. 

Although I enjoyed working in the Church and Community, I found delight in the fine arts 
of homemaking. Music played an important part in rearing our children. I was always interested 
in the activities of the youth. I spent many years teaching in Sunday School, Primary, Cub 
Scouts and Mutual. I served as a counselor in the Primary and as a Relief Society Visiting 
Teacher, enjoying each calling as it came. 

Lynn and I were Co-Presidents of North Bonneville P.T.A for 1963 to 1964. We were 
always active in the things our children were involved in. 

One of our choice church callings was a joint assignment as Missionary Guides at the 
Idaho Falls Temple Visitor's Center. We held this position for six years until the full-time 
missionaries took over. 

The children attended church and elementary school at Ucon and graduated from 
Bonneville High School. They always took an active part. 

DeAnn is a very talented girl who enjoys drama and music. At seventeen, she was giving 
piano lessons. She was chosen to represent Bonneville High School at Girls State, was also "Girl 
of the Month" and President of the Pep Club. At Ricks College, she was chosen President of 
"O'Mega Club". She is a registered nurse and has had special training in intensive care and has 
been the Intensive Care Instructor at Cottonwood Hospital in Murray, Utah. She is presently a 
supervisor there. (1986) 

DeAnn married Richard Schuif in the Salt Lake Temple on February 14, 1963. They were 
married by President Thomas S. Monson. They have a lovely home in South Jordan, Utah, close 
to the Temple. They have three daughters, Tia Jelaire born December 27, 1964. She is married 
to George Romney and they have our first great-grandchild, Garrett. They added two girls, 
Brittany and Ashlyn. Stacy KoNae born November 9, 1966. She married Jerry Schlappe and 
they are the proud parents of Drake and Crew. Ann Chalon born March 4, 1969. She married 
Duncan Miles; they have three children, Durrant, Stantson and Gavin. 

Dale served as priesthood organist in the Ucon Ward from the time he was a deacon until 
he graduated from high school. He was president of the deacons and the teachers quorums. He 
received his Duty to God award by having 100% attendance at all his meetings for four years. 
He became an Eagle Scout at the age of 16. He was always active in sports. He was light- 
weight wrestling champion his sophomore year at Bonneville High School, President of 
Bonneville Madrigals singing group and President of the Seminary. He filled a mission in the 
southern states, from 1963 to 1965, where he was senior elder after three weeks. He also served 
as district leader, zone leader and traveling representative with the mission president. 

After his mission, he returned to Rick's College, where he was called as Sunday School 
Superintendent. He graduated from B.Y.U. with a degree in Industrial Psychology and 
Sociology and a degree in Secondary Education. 

Dale was employed by Utah State Employment Service at Brigham City, Utah. It seemed 
he could always find time to help everyone. 

He married Carol Holyoak on June 5, 1968, in the Salt Lake Temple. They were married 
by President Hunsaker, who was Dale's Mission President. They were a spiritual couple and 
were always active in their church callings. 

They have three children. Scott H. was born on May 24. 1969, in Provo, Utah. Karen 
was born on December 30, 1971, in Brigham City, Utah and Lana was born on February 25, 
1973, in Brigham City, Utah. 



213 



July of 1975, Dale was stricken with leukemia. Oh, the heart break! It was hard to see 
him suffer day after day. He was always cheerful and optimistic, but he gradually grew weaker 
and weaker. We went to Brigham City often to give him what help and encouragement we 
could. In July 1977 he called to tell us his Doctor told him of a new treatment that was available 
at the University Hospital. He said they decided to go there for the treatment and he wanted us 
to come and be with him. We rented an apartment in Salt Lake so we could be at the hospital 
near Dale, to comfort him and relieve Carol when we could. The treatment was not successful 
and after six weeks, on August 31, 1977, he passed away. After everything possible had been 
done for him, we came to realize that our Father in Heaven had called him to a more important 
mission, even than that of rearing his little children. 

About two years later, Carol married Lee Workman, a widower from Rexburg. 

In October of 1973, I was helping Lynn cover our third crop of hay with plastic and 4X8 
sheets of plywood. The stack was twelve bales high. As I picked up a sheet of plywood, a 
strong gust of wind came from the southwest and caught the plywood, causing me to be blown 
off the stack with the plywood. The fall knocked the breath out of me for a short time. Most of 
my body was bruised and I had severe chest pains. I know the Lord was watching over me. 

Five months later, March of 1974, I woke up one night with severe muscle cramps in 
both legs. I attempted to get up to walk, but as I did, I fainted and fell, breaking my left leg at 
the ankle. It took Dr. Kruger over an hour to put a cast on. I kept getting cramps in my leg and 
couldn't hold still. I had the cast on for eight weeks. My leg still bothers me when I'm on it a 
lot. The fall was caused from my potassium being too low. When I did the laundry, I slid my 
crutches down the basement steps, then followed them one step at a time and stayed there until 
the washing and drying was finished. Then I'd climb back up the steps on my hands and knees 
to my wheel chair. Lynn was at work, so I was on my own. There was nobody to help me. 

Howard, our youngest son, was priesthood organist for six years, first counselor in the 
deacon's quorum, and president of the teacher's quorum. He earned his Duty to God award, was 
an eagle scout and secretary of the priest quorum. 

When he was in the seventh grade, he won first place in the Bonneville Junior High 
Science Fair with a project on "The Human Heart." He served as president of the Madrigals at 
Bonneville and was vice president of the seminary. He was called to serve in the Southern 
California Mission for 1969 to 1971. He was a district and zone leader. 

After he returned from his mission, he served as priest quorum advisor at Ricks College 
and "Father" of a family group of college students. After graduating from Ricks College, he 
went to BYU to continue his studies in Sociology. 

He is also a good carpenter. He worked on the Osmond's Recording Studio while in 
Provo going to school. 

He married Patricia Jeppson on April 24, 1973 in the Salt Lake Temple. They are a 
spiritual couple, always active and working with the youth. 

They were managers of an apartment complex and Howard drove a school bus to pay 
expenses. He graduated in the spring of 1 975 with a Bachelors Degree in Sociology. 

After several years working for the State of Idaho and several years in the insurance 
business and farming the family farm, Howard and Patty have gone into the vending machine 
business. They joint manage it and they enjoy it very much. 

They were blessed with five children. Jonathan Lynn was born March 5, 1975 in Provo, 
Utah. All the other children were born in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Tara was born November 30, 
1978, Jacob Dale was born July 25, 1982, Angelica was born August 25, 1987 and Krystina was 
born on October 3, 1992 and completed the family. 



214 



Jonathan is very much like his father in appearance and talent. He has a keen inquiring 
mind. Tara is like her mother in appearance and gentle disposition, and is easy to please. She is 
very particular, just like her Grandmother Randall. Jacob Dale is a combination of everybody 
and has his own sweet enthusiastic personality. He has his parents and grandparents wrapped 
around his finger. He is so cute and is always doing something to laugh about. 

In June of 1976 we had our plans changed about retiring in Rexburg. The Teton Dam 
broke and the flood waters destroyed the home we had purchased there. We moved into the 
home we had purchased in Idaho Falls. Howard transferred from Orfino to the Idaho Falls office 
and rented out the farm. 

In March 1979, Lynn had a heart attack and in May he had heart surgery at the LDS 
Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has recovered well, but must watch his diet and not do 
heavy work. The surgeon who performed the surgery was Dr. Russell Nelson. He was the same 
surgeon that performed heart surgery on President Kimball. Dr. Nelson retired as a heart 
surgeon when he was called to be one of the twelve apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints. 

In March of 1986, Lynn had cataract surgery on his left eye and now has 20/20 vision. 
He recovered quickly. 

In 1981 we decided to build a new home. We drew up our own plans. We were our own 
general contractor and we purchased all our own materials. It was a lot of fun and very 
interesting. It's a lovely, four bedroom, white brick home on Laurelwood Ave. in Idaho Falls. 
We enjoy it very much. 

Autobiography by Eldora Weekes Randall - Edited for publication 

They kept very busy taking care of a rental home and managing their forty acre farm and 
keeping the farm house rented out. 

They were responsible for conducting sacrament meeting services at the Lincoln Court 
Retirement Center, for many years. 

They lived in their home until they passed away. Eldora passed away July 31, 1999 and 
Lynn passed away a week later, August 7, 1999. They are buried in the Sutton Cemetery, 
Archer, Madison, Idaho. 



215 



Family Group Record- 2127 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband 


Richard P. SCHUIF-4616 








I 
I 


Bom 


8 Feb 1938 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


27 Mar 1938 j Place 


Baptized 


28 Feb 1946 




Died 


! Place 


Endowed 


10Jun1948 


SLAKE 


Buried 


i Place 


SealPar 




Mamed 


14 Feb 1963 ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


14 Feb 1963 


SLAKE : 


Husband's father Peter SCHUIF-7036 






MRIN: 2130 I 


Husband-smother Hertha HOLLINDERBAUMER-7046 








Wife 


DeAnnRANDALL-4613 










Bom 


25 Sep 1941 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 




Place 


Baptized 


24 Sep 1949 


L_ 




Died 




Place 


Endowed 


8 Feb 1964 


SLAKE 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




wifes father Lynn Lerov RANDALL-1 301 






MRIN: 467 




wife's mother Eldora Peart WEEKES-1 1 63 








Children 


List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


F TiaJelaireSCHUIF-6939 




Bom 


27 Dec 1964 | Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


Baptized 


6 Jan 1973 


i 




Chr. 


| Place 


Endowed 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


| Place 










Spouse 


Georae, ROMNEY-6942 






MRIN 3529, 




Married 


17 Aua 1984 I Place Riverton, SaltLake. Salt Lake 


SeaISp 






F 


Stacy KoNae SCHUIF-6940 




Bom 


9 Nov 1966 Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


Baptized 


1 Dec 1974 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 


! Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


I Place 










Spouse 


Jerry SCHLAPPI-6963 






MRIN: 3530 j 




Married 


14 Jul 1997 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


14 Jul 1997 


SLAKE ! 


F Ann Chalon SCHUIF-6941 




Bom 


4 Mar 1969 


Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


Baptized 


5 Mar 1977 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC^ 






Buried 


: Place 










Spouse 
Married 


Duncan F 
21 Feb 1992 


MILES-6962 






MRIN: 3531 




Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


21 Feb 1992 


SLAKE 



Prepared by Cart Nykam p 

| Phon e 20 8-523-7378 

E-maii address cari(8)s rv. myrf.ne t 

Date prepared 22 Mar 2006, 



Address 140 54 N 65 E 



Idaho .Falls. 
Idaho 



33401 USA 



216 



RICHARD & DEANN RANDALL SCHUIF FAMILY 

My parents are Eldora Weekes and Lynn LeRoy Randall. I was born at their home in 
Rexburg, Idaho. September 25, 1941. Shortly after, we moved to Archer, Idaho. I can remember, 
the wood burning stove, the wood box, the out house, the treadle sewing machine, thunder mugs 
jugs, and walking on top of snow drifts going to the neighbor's house to get the mail, because we 
were snowed in. Because of World War II, some commodity items such as gas, butter, sugar, 
flour and rubber were rationed. You were issued stamps for such items. I can remember the 
ration stamps and mixing a little tube of yellow coloring into the margarine to make it look like 
butter. Flour came in a sack of floral material. This material was saved and used to make aprons, 
curtains, quilts, and even underpants. All families worked hard and were very frugal. 

When I was about the age of five, our family moved to a forty-acre farm in Ucon, Idaho. 
By this time I had a little brother named Dale. Children were expected to work and do what they 
could to help the family. These chores taught children responsibility and I gained a great work 
ethic as a result of growing up on a farm. All children were taught to be seen and not heard. 

We made our work fun. We would tease the geese, walk on rolling barrels, and jump rail 
fences. When we were able to jump at one level, we raised the pole higher. Going swimming, or 
tubing in the canal was always a fun activity. Dad used to say we couldn't go swimming until the 
snow was off the mountains. With the Teton Peaks in sight the snow was never off the 
mountains. When the farm work was done in the fall, we liked to go huckleberrying, or go 
through Yellowstone Park with Uncle Newell and lots of cousins in the old yellow school bus. 

My brother Howard was born on dad's 36th birthday February 11, 1951, while we were living in 
Ucon. Howard now lives in Rexburg and has a wonderful family. 

My dad, Lynn Randall, worked at the Utah & Idaho Sugar factory in Lincoln, Idaho. 
Local farmers grew sugar beets, which were processed and made into sugar. Before and after 
work dad did the farming, leaving many chores to mom and us kids. We raised chickens, pigs, 
rabbits, and cows. The animals needed to be fed morning and night. This was a full time job in 
itself. I can remember hoeing beets, weeding potatoes, changing water and hauling hay (before 
we even had hay balers). We used a derrick (driven by a pair of horses) and a Jackson Fork to 
move hay to the top of the stack. When the grain was ripe, neighboring farmers would work in 
teams to thrash the grain. This was a big event, not only for the men, who worked hard, but the 
women who cooked dinner for the workers who always had big appetites. 

In the fall all schools were dismissed for two weeks for potato harvest. Before the potato 
combine we picked potatoes in a rubber basket and dumped them into gunny sacks. Every 10th 
one you would set out so at the end of the long row you could tell how many you had picked, as 
you were paid by the sack. You recorded the number in a little tablet and kept track of the 
number of sacks you picked each day. This was before the potato combine. This machine sped 
up the process and took a lot of back aches away, as picking spuds was hard work. . Money 
earned was spent on school clothes; black & white saddle oxfords, Jantzen sweaters, & Felt 
skirts. We were taught to wear it out or fix it up before we bought any new clothes. 

All meals were made from scratch. Women prided themselves on their ability to cook. 
My mother and her sisters were all good cooks. We didn't have cake mixes or all of the 
convenient foods, or the fast food stops we have today. WTien boxed cake mixes came out, it was 
an insult to a good cook if you used a boxed mix rather than making one from scratch. 



217 



I can remember the old Ucon church and participating in building the new Ucon church. I 
attended Ucon Elementary School. The class of 1959 was the second to graduate from the new 
Bonneville High School in Lincoln. After high school graduation, I attended Ricks College and 
received my nursing degree. In 1961 1 came to Salt Lake City and started working at L.D.S. 
hospital in the thoracic unit. I enjoyed a wonderful nursing career. I worked in intensive care, 
coronary care, & 30 years in emergency. Fifteen years as a staff nurse, and fifteen years as the 
director of Cottonwood emergency service. 

In July of 1963, I had a blind date with my future husband, Richard Schuif. He served a 
mission in New Zealand and was attending school at the University of Utah. We were married in 
the Salt Lake Temple February 14, 1964, by Pres. Thomas S. Monson. Richard retired from 
Alpine school district, where he served 15 years as an administrator, & fifteen as a teacher. He 
has two master degrees. 

After two years of marriage we were able to build a new home in South Jordan, Utah 
where we presently live. 

We are the parents of three beautiful daughters: Tia Jelaire, Stacey KoNae, and Ann 
Chalon. We call each of our girls by their middle names. All of our girls are now married, and 
have blessed our lives with, eight grandchildren who are the joy of our lives. Our family is very 
close and involved with each other on a daily basis. 

Our oldest daughter, Jelaire, attended Utah State where she met and married George 
Romney. They have 3 children and live in Wellsville, Utah. Jelaire is the Manager of the 
ShopKo store in Brigham City, Utah. George drives truck for Miller's. Garett is their oldest son 
and is presently in Alaska. Brittany is our first granddaughter and is now fifteen, and an Honor 
Student, and has lots of friends. She looks exactly like her mother, with olive skin and long dark 
brown hair. Ashlyn is twelve, an Honor Student as well, and plays the violin. Both girls enjoy 
music, dance and sports, which include four wheeling, snowmobiling, and water skiing. They 
have busy schedules and are always on the go. 

KoNae is married to Jerry Schlappi . They live in Erda, Utah. KoNae has a Masters 
Degree in Special Education, and teaches school. Jerry is a private investigator for the state of 
Utah fish and game department. He is perfect for this job, as he goes hunting even on his days 
off. They are the parents of two little boys. Drake is five years old. He plays Soccer and T-Ball. 
Crew will be three in September. He has a darling little personality. Both little boys love 
animals, fishing, camping and roping grandpa's sheep. 

Chalon is married to Duncan Miles. They live in South Jordan about 3 miles from our 
home. Chalon graduated from the University of Utah, and works as an accountant for Utah 
Medical Association. Duncan is busy managing three Quiznos' franchises. Durrant at 10 years 
of age, is a natural athlete. He excels in soccer, basketball, and football, as well as playing the 
violin, & piano. Stantson is seven years old. He attends the advanced placement school. Stantson 
lives to play soccer. He eats, sleeps and thinks of cows and horses. In his free time he practices 
the piano, and draws pictures of wild animals. Gavin is four years old and shares his brothers' 
love for cows and horses. Gavin will start kindergarten this fall. All of our little boys are 
cowboys. 

Richard has a herd of 30 Black Angus cows which are in Tooele in the winter and 
trucked to Wyoming in the summer. Each year, we keep the little steers in our 2 acre pasture in 
South Jordan. We also have a registered quarter horse named Jackie. 

We have always been active in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Richard 
and I have been called to many leadership positions. Richard has served as a member of the high 



218 



council, stake presidency, and as bishop of our ward. I have served in the stake Young Women's 
presidency, the Relief Society stake board, the ward Young Women's presidency, the Primary 
president, and twice as Relief Society president. I have taught in a lot of the church 
organizations. Our lives have been greatly blessed and enriched as a result of our service. 

After retirement, we were called to a service mission. We served in the priesthood 
department at the church office building in Salt Lake City, answering phone calls regarding 
church policy. We received and answered phone calls from all over the world. Church members 
as well as non-members called with various questions. We kept a log of questions, and our 
responses, which were reviewed by the general board. 

We enjoy traveling and keeping in touch with friends and family. We enjoy and treasure 
the life histories of our ancestors and their sacrifices. We are grateful for their testimonies, 
dedication, and their contribution to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. We are 
grateful for the rich heritage they have left us. 




Richard & DeAnn Randall Schuif 



219 



Family Group Record- 4143 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband Dale Lynn RANDALL-1 0423 




Bom 11Jun1944 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 5JuM952 




Died 31 Auq 1977 


place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 


Endowed 3 Auq 1963 




Buried 


Place Bnqham City. Utah 


SealPar BIC 




Married 5Jun1968 


Place Salt Lake City. Salt Lake, Utah 


seaisp 5Jun1968 


SLAKE 


Husband's father Lynn LeTO 
Husband's mother EWora Pe 


V RANDALL-6260 


MRIN: 2128 


ariWEEKES-6119 




Wife 




Bom 10 Dec 1944 


Place Buriey, Cassia, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Tempte 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 25 Jan 1953 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 15Jun1968 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




other spouse Lee Alma WORKMAN-1 3760 


MRIN: 6003 


Married 10 Auq 1979 I Place Oqden, . Utah 


SearSp 


wrfe-s father Georqe Albert HOLYOAK-1 3792 


MRIN: 6016 


wife's mother Laurece Davis LARSEN- 1 3793 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


Scott Randall WORKMAN-1 3761 




Bom 24 May 1969 


Place Provo. Utah, Utah 


Baptized 4Jun1977 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 26 Apr 1988 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Lindsay WESCOTT-1 376 


MRIN: 6004 


Married 19 May 1995 (D) 


Place South Jordan. Utah 


seaisp 19 May 1995 1 JRIVE 


F 


Karen Randall WOR 


KMAN-13762 




Bom 20 Dec 1971 


Place Brtgham City, Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 2 Feb 1980 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 15Jun1996 


JRIVE 


Died 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse 




Married I Place 


SeaBp 


F 


Lana Randall WORKMAN-1 3763 




Bom 25 Feb 1973 


Place Bngham City. Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 28 Feb 1981 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 26 NOV 1993 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar BIC 


i 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Jesse Adam CLEVERLEY- 13767 


MRIN: 6005 


Married 18 Dec 1993 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


seaisp 18 Dec 1993 1 IFALL 



Husband Lee Alma WORKMAN-1 3760 



Wife 



Carol Jean HOLYOAK-1 0426 



Notes 

HUSBAND - Lee Alma WORKMAN-1 3760 

Carol Holyoak Randall married Lee Alma Workman 10 Aug 1979 in 
the Ogden Temple. Carol and Dale Randall's children 
were legairy adopted by Lee and took the Workman name. 



Prepared by 
Phone 



_Cari_Nykamp_ 
208 -523-7378 



kfB" 1 ** *«*& ca rt@sry,myrf.net 

Date prepared 27 Dec 2005 _ 



Address 140 54 N. 65 E. 



Jdaho Falls. Idah o 83401 



United State s Of Ame rica 



220 



DALE & CAROL HOLYOAK RANDALL FAMILY 

Dale Lynn Randall (son of Lynn & Eldora Weekes Randall) was married to Carol Jean 
Holyoak (daughter of Albert & Laurece Larsen Holyoak) on June 5, 1968, in the Salt Lake 
Temple. That summer Dale and Carol both attended Brigham Young University to continue 
their education. Dale graduated from BYU with a degree in Sociology the spring of 1968 and 
with a teaching certificate in 1969. 

Scott Randall was born May 24, 1969, in Provo, Utah. Shortly after Scott's birth, Dale 
and Carol moved to Pocatello, Idaho, where Dale taught school for one year at Highland High. 
Dale had done an internship with Utah Job Service in Provo and was anxious to find employment 
working with Job Service. 

This opportunity became available to him in August of 1970. After Carol's graduation 
from Brigham Young University the summer of 1970, the family moved to Blanding, Utah. 
They went feeling a little anxious, but learned to love the area with the Blue Mountains, the 
Bluffs and Indian ruins. Dale loved his new job and Carol taught school that first year. It was a 
very positive experience, and there are fond memories of the time spent there. Blanding was 
good to them. They moved down in a car and moved back in a U-Haul truck! 

In October of 1971, Dale applied for a transfer to Brigham City, Utah. This move made 
it possible to be closer to family. Dale was hired to work in the Brigham City Job Service Office 
by Kenneth Godfrey, who soon became his bishop and later his stake president. 

Their first daughter, Karen, was born in Brigham City on December 30, 1971. Lana was 
anxious to join the family and was born in Brigham City on February 25, 1973. They had their 
hands full with three active little ones, the oldest being four years old. 

Dale and Carol felt they had found their place to live. Dale loved working for Job 
Service. Carol was busy being a full time mom. They bought a home close to where they had 
rented in Brigham City, with familiar neighborhood and friends. In June of 1975 it was 
discovered that Dale had leukemia. He received treatment for two years at the University of 
Utah Medical Center. He passed away August 3, 1977 in Salt Lake City, Utah at the age of 33. 
He is buried in the Brigham City Cemetery. 

On August 10, 1979, Carol married Lee Workman in the Ogden Temple and moved to 
Rexburg, Idaho. Lee had lost his wife, Myrna LaRue Walker, in April 1977. He had two small 
children. Jason, born December 12, 1973, and Denise, born February 20, 1975. Lee has been 
employed as Director of Accounting Services with what is now BYU-Idaho for 29 years. 
Carol's marriage to Lee added two more children to the family. The Randall children were given 
the Workman name to make the combining of two families easier. 

Scott Randall Workman married Lindsay Wescott on May 19, 1995, in the Jordan River 
Temple. They have one son, Ryson Scott Workman, born May 17, 1999, in Salt Lake City, 
Utah. Scott served a mission to Kingston Jamaica and attended school at Ricks College and Salt 
Lake Community College. They live in Riverton, Utah and Scott works as an electrician for 
Taylor Electric. 

Karen Randall Workman attended Ricks College, graduating with an associate degree in 
early child development. She worked as a nanny in New York and then served a mission to the 
Nebraska Omaha Mission. After returning from her mission, she took classes at Salt Lake 
Community College to certify as a CNA. She now works at the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. 

Lana Randall Workman married Adam Cleverley in the Idaho Falls Temple on December 
18. 1993. They have two sons and one daughter. Kade Adam was born September 18, 1997 in 



221 



Portland, Oregon. Nicole Christine was born October 16, 1999 in Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Jace 
Alma was born August 7, 2003 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

Lana graduated from Ricks College with an associate degree in Office Education. She is 
a full time mom and helps her husband in his Chiropractic Office in Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

Jason Workman married Erica Gardner, September 8, 2000, in the Salt Lake Temple. 
Jason served a mission to Fortaleza, Brazil. He graduated from BYU in Computer Engineering 
and works as a computer programmer in Lehi, Utah. They have two daughters, Macaslin Riley 
born May 31, 2001 in American Fork, Utah, and Hailey Tate born December 25, 2003 in 
Murray, Utah. 

Denise Workman married Kevin Murri on November 20, 1996, in the Idaho Falls 
Temple. Denise graduated from Ricks College with an associate degree in nursing and works 
with IHC Home Care in Ogden, Utah. They have two daughters and one son. Melanie Dawn 
was born December 15, 1998 in Provo, Utah, Johnathan Kevin was born August 12, 1999, in 
Provo and Sarah LaRue was born February 14, 2003, in Ogden, Utah. 

Carol worked in the Financial Office at BYU-Idaho and retired in December 2003. Lee 
is still working but may retire in a year and go on a mission with Carol. They both have 
completed their sixth year as temple officiators in the Idaho Falls Temple and are looking 
forward to the building of the Rexburg Temple. They reside in Rexburg, Idaho, and plan to 
spend their retirement years there. 




*».... ^M. £ 



Dale & Carol Randall Family 
Karen, Lana, Dale, Carol, Scott 



222 



Family Group Record- 6025 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Lee Alma WORKMAN-1 3760 




Bom 24 Mar 1938 


place Murrav, Salt Lake, Utah 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


2 Nov 1946 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


23 Sep 1958 




Buned 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Mamed Jan 1973 


Place Salt Lake Citv. Utah, Utah 


SeaISp 


Jan 1973 


SLAKE 


other spouse CarolJean HOL YOAK- 1 0426 




MRIN: 6003 


Mamed 10 Aua 1979 I Place Oaden. . Utah 


SeaISp 


I 


Husband's father Joseph Alma WORKMAN-1 381 4 




MRIN 6026 


Husband's mother Delia PALMER-1 381 5 






Wife 




Bom 14Auq1940 


Place Gallup, McKinley, New Mexico 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 




Died 20 Apr 1977 


Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake. Utah 


Endowed 




Buried 


Place South Jordan. Salt Lake. Utah 


SealPar 




wife's father Frank Leroy WALKER-1 381 6 




MRIN: 6027 


wife's mother Viola DAVIS-1 381 7 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M 


Jason Alma WORKrv 


AN-13764 




Bom 12 Dec 1973 


Place Provo. Utah. Utah 


Baptized 


2 Jan 1982 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Dec 1992 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Erica GARDNER-1 381 8 




MRIN: 6028 


Mamed 8 Sep 2000 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Utah. Utah 


SeaISp 


I 


F 


Denise WORKMAN-1 3765 




Bom 20 Feb 1975 


Place Provo. Utah. Utah 


Baptized 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9 Nov 1996 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Kevin MURRI-13819 




MRIN: 6029 


Married 30 Nov 1996 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


30 Nov 1996 I FALL 



prepare d by C arl Nykamp 
"«• _2Q8=523^7378_ 



E-maii a ddress c arl@srv.myrf.net 

Date prepared 28 Dec 2005 



Address 1405 4 N. 6 5 E. 



Jdaho Fallsjdahp _83401 _ 



United ..States OlAmerica 



223 




The Workman & Randall Family 2005 
Back: Adam & Jace Cleverly, Scott Randall Workman, Karen Randall Workman 

Lee Workman, Hailey & Jason Workman, Sarah & Kevin Murri 
Middle : Lana Randall Workman Cleverly, Lindsay Workman, Carol Workman, 

Erica Workman, Denise Workman Murri 
Front: Kade & Nicole Cleverly, Ryson Workman, Macaslin Workman, Johnathan, 

& Melanie Murri 



224 



Family Group Record- 2129 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband 


Howard Lerov RANDALL-4615 






i 


i 
i 


Bom 


11 Feb 1950 


Place Riqby, Jefferson, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


2 Apr 1950 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Mar 1958 




Died 




Place 


Endowed 


15 Feb 1969 


SLAKE ! 


I 


Buried 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




I 
j 


Married 


24ADM973 


Place Salt Lake City. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Apr 1973 


SLAKE 


Husband 


s father Lynn Leroy RANDALL-1 301 






MRIN: 467 I 


Husband's mother Eldora Pearl WEEKES-1 163 








Wife 


Patricia JEPPSON-461 8 










Bom 


9 Feb 1954 Place Boise, Ada, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


7 Mar 1954 , 


Place Boise. Ada, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Mar 1962 




Died 




Place 


Endowed 


24 Apr 1973 


SLAKE 




Buried 




Place 


SealPar 








wife's father Howard Guyman JEPPSON-7300 






MRIN: 3690 




wifes mother Dora Belle WILSON-7301 






| 


Children 


List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M Jonathan Lynn RANDALL-6964 




Bom 


5 Mar 1975 


piace Provo, Utah. Utah 


Baptized 


5 Mar 1982 




Chr. 




Place 


Endowed 




Died 


jPtace 


SealPar 


BIC] 




Buried 


I Place 










Spouse 


Dee Anna WINKLE-5917 






MRIN: 2924 


L J 


Married 


i Place 


SeaISp 






F Tara RANDALL-6965 




Bom 


30 Nov 1978 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Dec 1986 






Chr. 




Place 


Endowed 








Died 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buned 




Place 




Spouse 


Cameron SMITH-5193 






MRIN: 2445 




Married 


| Place 


SeaISp 






M Jacob Dale RANDALL-6966 


r 1 


Bom 


25 Jul 1982 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville Idaho 


Baptized 


1990 




Chr. 


! Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 




Place 






Spouse 








! 


Married 


| Place • 


SeaISp 






F Angelica RANDALL-6967 


I Bom 


22 Auq 1987 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville Idaho 


Baptized 


1995 




| 


Chr 




Place 


Endowed 






Died 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 




Place ! 


Spouse 


.. ,. . 










Married 


i Place 


SeaISp 




n~ 


F 


Krysti 


na Belle RANDALL-6968 










Bom 


3 Oct 1992 | Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


Baptized 


2000 


■ i 




Chr. 




Place 


Endowed 






| 

i 

i 

i 


Died 

Buried 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Place 








Spouse 








i 
1 


Married 


| Place 


SeaISp 




1 



! Pr epared by 
i Phone 



Cart Nykamp 



208-523:7378 

E-mail ad dress cari@srv.myflne_t_ 
Date prepared 7 Mar 2006 



Address 14054 N 65 E 
Idaho Falls 

Idaho 

83401 USA 



225 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband Everett Charles BRINDLE 




Bom 26 May 1912 


Place Formosa, Jewell, Kansas, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1950 






Died 23Jun1994 


Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 


27 Feb 1957 


UFALL 




Buried 27Jun1994 [Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


SealPar 


21 Feb 1981 


IFALL 




Mamed 25 Jul 1947 ! Place Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho. USA 


SeaISp 


30 Dec 1957 


IFALL 




Husbands father Samuel O. BRINDLE 






i 




Husband's mother Mav CLARK 






I 


wife Alta 




Bom 3 Jul 1914 j Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. i Place 


Baptized 


5Auq1922 




Died 30 Dec 1993 j Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


18 Jul 1947 


IFALL 




Buried 3 Jan 1994 i Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's father John Samuel WEEKES 










wife's mother Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVER 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


F Joyce BRINDLE 




Bom 11 Sep 1948 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


29 Sep 1956 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Jun 1967 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Feb 1957 


IFALL 




Buried I Place 










Spouse Vernal Rex LARSEN 




Married 21 Jun 1967 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


21 Jun 1967 


IFALL 


M ! Standley Glen BRINDLE 




Bom 28 Mar 1951 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 29 Mar 1951 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


27 Feb 1957 


IFALL 


Buried 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 








Spouse 




Married j Place 


SeaISp 






M 


Alden W. BRINDLE 




Bom 26 Sep 1952 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Nov 1960 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


1971 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Feb 1957 


IFALlP 


Buried 


Place 








Spouse Tanya RAYBURN 








Married 20 Dec 1974 (D) i Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


20 Dec 1974 


IFALL 


spouse Gail Anne SHELDON 


Married 3 Jul 1986 (D) I Place 


SeaISp 








spouse Marie 




Mamed 6 Apr 2003 j Place 


SeaISp 







226 




Everett & Alta Brindle Family 
Left: Everett, Alta 
Right: Everett, Alden, Alta 
Joyce 

Below: Joyce, Everett ,Alta 
Alden 
Below Right: Alta 





227 



ALTA WEEKES & EVERETT CHARLES BRINDLE 

Alta, the 10th child and 6th daughter of John Samuel and Ida Isabel Grover Weekes, was 
born 3 July 1914 in the family home in Sunnydell, Idaho. She was born with serious health 
problems. Her body was almost literally in two pieces. The family carefully carried her around 
on a pillow and took care of her for about 6 weeks until she had gained strength. Then they knew 
that medical help was necessary. A country doctor in Rexburg consented to operate on the baby, 
so after much prayer and fasting and a special blessing from her parents' friend, a blind patriarch 
of their stake, Alma B. Larsen, the surgery was performed. She was either the first or second 
baby west of the Mississippi River to survive such a surgery. The blessing from Patriarch Larsen 
had promised that she would indeed survive and that she would live to be a mother. This blessing 
was fulfilled. Even the doctor considered the outcome a miracle and wrote about that time in a 
letter to her sister Maude many years later. 

Alta was born into a family that worked long and hard. She was in constant pain from the 
problems she had at birth, but she too was a very hard worker. Because she was quite fragile, she 
did not perform farm work as her sisters did. Instead, she worked around the home and yard, 
cleaning, cooking and canning produce from the family's large garden. 

She attended school in Sunnydell where, to her consternation, her teacher tried to change 
her left handed writing to right handed writing, by tying her left hand behind her back. This went 
on until her parents heard of it and informed the teacher that Alta could write with her left hand 
if she wanted to and to leave her alone. Alta often lamented about that occurrence in her life. She 
received awards for arithmetic and had an outstanding memory for numbers. She was a walking 
phone book. She graduated from Madison High School in Rexburg and then continued to live 
with her parents in the family home, helping them with the work around the home and raising 
eggs to sell for spending money. After her Mother passed away, she cooked and kept house for 
both her Father and brother, Ursel. Alta and her father often played Chinese checkers together. 
They were quite evenly matched and after her father's passing Alta never found a comparable 
player. She loved to play, but her children never did learn the game well enough to be 
competition. 

On 25 July 1947, she married Everett Charles Brindle from Craig, Colorado, in Pocatello, 
Idaho. They honeymooned by driving an old army truck back to Craig to bring Everett's 
livestock to Idaho. 

Alta's family home was their first home, but wanting a place of their own, they purchased 
a small home and a farm near Menan, Idaho, where their first child, a daughter Joyce, was born 
on 11 September 1948. In the spring of 1949 Alta's father visited them and asked them to 
consider coming back to her birthplace and said that he would sell them the home and 40 acres. 
They did move back, and her father lived with them much of the time for the next few years. As 
he got older, the children's noise bothered him and he spent most of his last days in the home of 
his daughter, Opal. 

A son, Stanley Glenn, was born to the couple on 27 March 1951, but he lived only one 
day. They were heartbroken and medical doctors advised them that, with Alta's health the way it 
was, they should not try for additional children. They were determined and finally found a doctor 
who would take care of her in another high-risk pregnancy. 



228 



On 26 September 1952, they were blessed with a son, Alden W. This was a second 
miracle in Alta's life. He was healthy and strong and brought much joy to them. 

Alta had been born with one eye that didn't develop right. It wasn't obvious to others, but 
Alta had very poor eyesight. Later, while a child, the tip of a buggy whip went into her other, 
good eye and affected the sight in that eye. In spite of these problems she did well in school and 
she read daily to her children. This instilled a love of reading in both of them. 

On 27 February 1957, Alta and Everett took their children to the Idaho Falls temple. 
There, with her brother Ursel acting as proxy for Stanley Glenn, they were sealed for time and all 
eternity as a family. 

Alta and Everett farmed the 40 acres for about 25 years. In addition they raised cattle and 
chickens and a large garden. They were very generous with their garden produce and Alta baked 
bread, which was often given to neighbors and friends. She, like her mother and sisters, loved 
flowers and had a beautiful flower garden. Alta couldn't stand for any food to be wasted. She 
remembered being told that her grandfather, Sidney Weekes had often been hungry and it made 
an impression on her. She canned or froze everything possible. 

As the time neared for the children to attend college, Alta worked at a potato processing 
plant in Lewisville. The money she earned made it possible for both her son and daughter to 
attend Ricks College and for Alden to fill a mission in Texas. Alta suffered from poor circulation 
in her legs and standing on the concrete floors further aggravated the condition. 

In the mid 1970's the farm was leased. They continued raising cattle but enjoyed more 
leisure time. They traveled to Alabama to see Alden and his family several times and to Kansas 
and Nebraska to see Everett's family. One of their favorite things to do was to play the game 
Aggravation. They had a running feud going between the two of them and they always had a 
report on who was ahead. They played for pennies and the competition was fierce. 

Alta passed away after a hard, pain-filled life on 30 December 1993, at the home of her 
daughter in Rexburg. Everett survived her by several months, passing away on 23 June 1994, in 
Idaho Falls. They are buried in the Sutton cemetery in Archer. 



229 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband Vernal Rex LARSEN 




Bom 22 Mar 1946 


Place Driggs, Teton, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


1 Mav 1954 j 


Died 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Jun 1967 i IFALL 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC j 




Mamed 21 Jun 1967 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


21 Jun 1967! IFALL 




Husbands father Clint Vernal LARSEN 




I 




Husbands mother Karla Jean HATCH 






Wife 




Bom 11 Sep 1948 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevillejdaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


29 Sep 1956 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Jun 1967 ' 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


27 Feb 1957 IFALL 




wife's father Everett Charles BRINDLE 


wifes mother Alta Grace WEEKES 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


F 


Danna Jean LARSEN 




Bom 14 Feb 1970 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Mar 1978 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


15 Sep 1992 


I IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


Buried 


Place 






spouse Darnell Paul WEEKES 






Mamed 19 Sep 1992 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


19 Sep 1992! IFALL 


M ! Travis Rex LARSEN 




Bom 18 Nov 1976 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Dec 19841 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


15SepJ995 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


rpiace 






Spouse Natalie MCKEE 




Mamed 12 Nov 1999 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


12 Nov 1999! IFALL 



230 





Rex & Joyce Brindle Larsen Family 
Back: Travis. Natalie, Danna, Paul 
Middle: Lexie Weekes. Rex, Malia.& Joyce Larsen 
Front: Courtney & Mckenzie Weekes 



Below left: Danna & Paul Weekes 
Below right: Travis & Natalie Larsen 




231 



JOYCE BRINDLE & REX LARSEN FAMILY 

The oldest child of Alta Grace Weekes and Everett Charles Brindle, I was born 1 1 
September 1948, after a wild ambulance ride from the maternity home in Rigby to the Idaho 
Falls Sacred Heart Hospital. My Mother often mentioned that time, and would never consent to 
ride in an ambulance again. My parents were older when I was born and, because of my Mother's 
poor health, they were extremely grateful for the small family that they were blessed with. 

My parents were living in a home by the Menan Butte and farming a small farm that they 
had purchased shortly after their marriage. Within a year after I was born, they sold that farm and 
purchased the home-place and 40 acres in Sunnydell, where mother grew up, from Grandpa 
Weekes. 

I have fond memories of growing up in the old home. Grandpa Weekes stayed with us 
often and we had an old wood rocking chair behind the kitchen door. Grandpa would sit and rock 
me by the hour. Later Aunt Opal refurbished that memory-filled chair. 

My parents were both hard workers. Grandpa tended me often while they were out doing 
the chores, tending the garden, or planting and harvesting. Whenever Grandpa went to town he 
would bring back a sack or two of candy. He had a real sweet tooth and I did too. I got my share 
of those lemon drops, white and pink peppermints and horehound candy. 

My earliest memories are of being read to by my Mother. Mother didn't like to read. Her 
sight in one eye was nil and the other was very poor. She wanted us to love reading so 
she made a special effort to make it important in our lives. She read us Bible stories from a large 
story book, stories from a book entitled Stories to Tell and later the Book of Mormon . My Dad 
read constantly, but it was Mother that inspired my love of reading. 

I took piano lessons from a neighbor, Bessie Wilcox. Alden and I would ride our bike to 
Bessie's house where we each were given an hour long lesson. Since we only had one bike we 
would take turns, one riding and the other walking. The one riding would ride ahead of the other 
one and then leave the bike and start walking. When the walker caught up to the parked bike they 
would climb on and ride ahead etc. From an early age I was given opportunities to play the piano 
in our ward. As soon as I graduated from Primary, Aunt Opal Clements, being the Primary 
president, put me to work in the nursery. After several years she must have been short a Primary 
teacher because I started teaching Primary when I was about 14. I have taught in the various 
Church organizations from that time until the present. 

I graduated from Madison High School and from Ricks College. I was named business 
graduate of the year at Ricks. 

V. Rex Larsen and I were married in the Idaho Falls temple on June 21, 1967. The next 
day Rex went back to work as a barber - no honeymoon for us. 

We were blessed with two children; Danna Jean, born 14 February 1970, in Rexburg and 
Travis Rex born 18 November 1976, also in Rexburg. 

Danna married Darnell Paul Weekes, a descendant of our Great Grandfather, Sidney 
Weekes through his second wife, Annie Bennett, in the Idaho Falls temple on 19 September 
1992. They live near Rexburg and have three daughters; McKenzie Marie born 31 July 1996, in 
Blackfoot, Idaho; Courtney Jeanessa born 15 July 1998, in Powell, Wyoming and Lexie Lynn 
born 1 August 2001, in Palestine, Texas. Danna is a wonderful mom and a very organized 
individual. She works for a local doctor as his office manager and Paul works at BYU-Idaho as 
an electrician. We are currently building a new home west of Rexburg, about one mile from 
Danna and Paul. They are always helping us and they keep track of our home while we are away. 



232 



Travis married Natalie McKee 12 November 1999 in the Idaho Falls temple. They have 
one daughter, Malia Echo born 17 March 2003 and they live in Saratoga Springs, Utah. Travis is 
a superintendent for a construction firm in Salt Lake City and Natalie teaches the computer lab in 
the Alpine school district. Travis is a person who is always finding someone to help. He is very 
generous with his time and his talents. He served a mission to the England London South 
Mission. 

My working experience has been in the areas of tax preparation and payroll for a CPA 
firm and working as an eligibility examiner for the state of Idaho. While I was working for the 
state I was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Through faith, prayers, and the hands of a skillful 
surgeon the tumor was removed. I have a few problems as a result of the tumor, I can't smell or 
taste and my balance and memory aren't what they used to be but I have been very blessed by my 
Heavenly Father. 

Rex retired from being fire chief of the Rexburg-Madison County fire department April 
1, 1995 and I retired from the state of Idaho on my fiftieth birthday, September 11, 1998. 

We live in the Rexburg area during the summers and we spend the winters in St George 
where we have a small park model home. In St George we keep busy in our little branch. I am 
currently serving in the Relief Society Presidency and Rex was just released from the Presidency 
of the High Priest Group. Rex leads a pack of 4-wheeling buddies who call themselves "Rex's 
rough riders". They ride all over. I volunteer in the Humanitarian center several days each week. 
At home in Rexburg we are busy being a part of our granddaughter's lives. Rex enjoys 4- 
wheeling and playing golf and I garden, read, sew and tinker on my computer. 

We have a great life. We are blessed with good health and surrounded by wonderful 
friends and family. 



233 



STANLEY GLEN BRINDLE 



Stanley Glen Brindle was born to Alta and Everett Brindle on 27 March 1951 
the oldest son and second child. 



He was 



Stanley was born with underdeveloped lungs and lived only one day. His death was very 
hard on his parents as they were older and his Mother had fragile health. They were told, by the 
doctors, that another pregnancy should not be attempted. After his birth Alta was taken to the 
home of her sister, Maude to recuperate. Funeral services were held in the Jeppson home. The 
casket was placed near the bedroom door so Alta could be in bed and still be part of the services. 
Aunt Maude & Uncle Gerald's home was filled to capacity with family & friends. Patriarch 
Alma B. Larsen, a very special man in his mother's life gave the remarks. Stanley was buried in 
the Sutton cemetery in Archer, Idaho. 




Joyce Brindle standing by her brother 
Stanley's casket at the funeral held in 
Aunt Maud's and Uncle Gerald's home 



234 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 



| Husband Alden W. BRINDLE 


i 


Bom 26 Sep 1952 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 6 NOV 1960 j 


Died 


Place 


Endowed 1971 { IFALL j 


Buried 


Place 


seaiPar 27 Feb 1957 f IFALL 


Mamed 20 Dec 1974 (D) 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


seaisp 20 Dec 1974 IFALL 


other Spouse Gail Anne SHELDON 






Married 3 Jul 1986 (D) ! Place 


SeaISp 




Other Spouse Marie 






Married 6 Apr 2003 Place 


SeaISp 




Husbands father Everett Charles BRINDLE 






Husbands mother Alta Grace WEEKES 




wife RAYBURN 




Bom 27 Mar 1956 Place 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr Place 


Baptized 






Died Place 


Endowed 20 Dec 1 974 


IFALL 


Buried Place 


SeaiPar 






other spouse Darrell C HILL 




Married 31 Dec 1986 ! Place J SeaISp 




wife's father James RAYBURN 




Wife's mother 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


I 
LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M ! Ryan Nathaniel BRINDLE 




Bom 3 Jan 1976 ! Place Oranqe, Port Arthur, Texas 


Baptized 






Chr. j Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SeaiPar 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse 






Married \ Place 


SeaISp 




M i Daniel Rayburn BRINDLE 




Bom 19 Auq 1980 j Place Idaho Falls Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


u_ I 




Chr. i Place 


Endowed 






Died Place 


SeaiPar 






Buried j Place 


; 




Spouse 






Mamed Place 


SeaISp 





235 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 1 



| Husband Alden W. BR 


NDLE 




Bom 26 Sep 1952 


place Idaho Falls, Bonnevillejdaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 6 NOV 1960 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 1971 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 27 Feb 1957 


IFALL 




Married 3 Jul 1986 (D) j Place 


SeaISp 






other spouse Tanya RAYBURN 




Mamed 20 Dec 1974 (D) I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaiSp 20 Dec 1974 


IFALL 


Other Spouse Marie 




Married 6 Apr 2003 I Place J SeaISp 






Husband's father Everett Charles BR I NDLE 








Husbands mother Alta Grace WEEKES 






wife Gail Anne SHELDON 




Bom 7 Oct 1956 Place Oswego, Oswego, New York 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. | Place 


Baptized 


Died | Place 


Endowed 


Buried j Place 


SealPar 


wife's father Richard George SHELDON 




wrfes mother Anne Marie BROWN 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


F 


Casandra BRINDLE 




Bom 24 Feb 1988 


Place 


Baptized 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 




Buried 


Place 








Spouse 




Mamed [Place 


SeaISp 






Alden Brindle purposing to Marie 



236 



ALDEN BRINDLE FAMILY 

I was born 9/26/52, son of Alta and Everett Brindle. One of my earliest memories is of 
my grandpa watching me while my folks were in the field working. For some long forgotten 
reason, 1 rode out on my tricycle towards my parents, but didn't make it because of a breakdown. 
Other early memories include giant cottonwood trees, old buildings on which to climb, a pile of 
old horse drawn machinery, geese, cows, cats & dogs, hay piles & derricks, irrigation ditches, 
wood stove, moth balls, hoeing garden, apple trees, raspberries, snow drifts, bicycles, swings, 
cobble stones, peach pies, potato cellars, chickens, sleeping outside in summer, wheel barrows 
and tractors, Saturday house cleaning, Saturday baths, Saturday card games, Sunday rush to 
church, making root beer on the roof of a shed. Each word lights up forgotten memories. I 
worked moving irrigation pipes, in the woods, cutting and hauling wood for fence posts, and on 
Ross Burn's ranch. Dad let me raise a 10 acre patch of potatoes by myself (sort of) one year. My 
sister Joyce was four years older than me. We were very close when I was small, but later I 
became a big pest. I love talking with her now on the phone and admire her and her family. 

My mother experienced a lot of pain in her life due to nerve problems. She worked hard 
and tried to be very giving to people. I know she loved me. I am sure that I contributed more than 
my fair share of the anxiety she often felt. Dad was quiet with a subtle sense of humor. It has 
been about ten years since they died. I hold them in my heart with a lot of love and appreciation 
for the gift of life as well as the sacrifices that they made for me. I am grateful to Joyce and her 
husband Rex for all they did for our parents in their last years. 

God was important to me as a child. I got in the habit of praying many times a day at one point in 
my young life. This stopped after a cousin teased me about my lapses of attention. I served a 
mission in Texas. It opened doors in me as I met many people with a wide spectrum of views on 
life. I then graduated from Ricks College and went on to BYU for a year, during which time 
Tanya Rayburn and I were married (12/20/74). Tanya was born 3/27/1956 in Orange, Texas. Out 
of money, we moved to Orange where I worked as a welder in a shipyard while continuing 
school in engineering, graduating in 1977. 

Ryan, my oldest son was born 1/4/76. He is currently living in Austin and is very close to 
a lovely lady named Erin, who is going to school for her masters degree in social work. Ryan 
drives a truck. Ryan is a really easy going person. He listens to other's opinions before 
contributing his own. He likes to think as he is driving. He is a large man with a large heart. 

We moved to Idaho Falls after college and I worked for Westinghouse at INEL. My 
second son Daniel was born 8/19/1980. Daniel is living in Phoenix and working for the 
University of Phoenix. He graduated last year from Idaho State University in computer 
programming. Daniel has a sensitive heart and is very loyal to his friends. Daniel is not one to 
follow the crowd. He is a creative person who likes to write and to work on computer programs. 

1 worked for GE in 1981, first in San Jose and then for four years in Switzerland. It was a 
time of a lot of changes inside of me. There was a fire in me to understand and grow. I read a lot, 
prayed a lot and meditated a lot. I found beauty and truths that excited my soul. Tanya and I were 
not moving in the same direction. Upon returning to New York, we were divorced, my older son 
living with me, I was empty and hurting. I met Gail (Born 10/7/56). She seemed to understand 
my deep desire for truth. One whirlwind courtship later I had a second wife; we were married 
7/3/86 and moved to Alabama in 1987 to work for TVA. 

During the Weekes family reunion in 1986, Gail and I were discussing having a baby. I 
was reluctant with all of the hurt that had occurred in the first marriage and things were not great 



237 



between the two of us. I went up to a beautiful spot to pray about having a child and saw a little 
girl falling on me in a soft and beautiful way. When Gail became pregnant I told her that we 
didn't need to think of a boy's name. 

Cassandra was born 2/24/1988. She has just graduated from high school and is planning 
on going to Maryville College this fall, majoring in writing and communications. As I am 
writing this she is writing a story on her computer. She loves to read and to write. 

I completed my masters degree in counseling and psychology in 1995 and quit TVA. We 
traveled for a bit and settled down where I now live in central Alabama on 80 acres in the middle 
of the woods with a river flowing through the property. Gail and I divorced in 1997. With help 
from friends and family I built a beautiful solar powered, straw-bale home. I went to work for 
Southern Company that year and still work there. I also go to a maximum security prison and 
lead a group discussion once per week. The experiences of teaching in prison has been a blessing 
to me. I feel a great brotherhood and love for the men in the class. 

In the summer of 2000 I went to a two week Buddhist meditation in Texas. I went back 
there to another 1 day session 6 months later and met the woman who is now my wife, Marie 
(Born 7/3/1954). She lived in Guadalajara, Mexico and coordinated a program teaching yoga in 
the University of Guadalajara. We started to communicate over the Internet and were married 
4/6/2003. My son asked me a few days ago what persons have most influenced my life. Top on 
the list is my Marie. It is a blessing to relate to someone that is interested in truth, beauty and 
realization. Marie still has to work some in Mexico in order to transition the yoga program into 
the hands of other people. Marie is planning on resigning from the University this August. I am 
hoping to be able to retire next year to allow moving into a new phase of life with Marie. 

Marie has a daughter; her name is Talia Sofia (Born 5/7/1983). She is studying music at 
the University of Guadalajara. 

I am trying to learn to speak Spanish and Marie is learning to play the piano and 
experimenting new ways of baking without wheat flour and sugar, she cooks great! We are 
starting a new garden, and enjoy taking care of the woods. We also have three cats: Tiger, Zing, 
and Flame. And we have wonderful friends nearby that live in an area called Common Ground. 

We send many blessings and our love to you. We would love to hear from you 
(alden@urisp.net). We will welcome you to our home if you are ever in the area. 




Ryan 



Daniel 



Alden 



Marie 



Talia 



Cassandra 



238 



Family Group Record- 1 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Newell Augustus PIQUET-104 




Bom 13 Jan 1920 


Place Bates, Teton, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Chr 4 Jul 1920 


Place Bates, Teton, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


28 Jun 19311 


i 


Died 17 Jul 2003 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


12 Mar 1941 I SLAKE 


Buned 21 Jul 2003 ' Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


29Jun1949 IFALL 


Mamed 12 Mar 1941 ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


12 Mar 1941 SLAKE 


other spouse Shirley HALL-4 1 


MRIN: 36 


Married 11 Jul 1996 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho Iseaisp 


I I 

I 


Husbands father Auqustus Constant PIQUET(PIGUET)-131 


MRIN: 15 I 


Husbands mother Man/ MARTI N-1 32 




wife Madonna WEEKES-2 




Bom 5 Feb 1919 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




chr 6 Apr 1919 J Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Feb 1927! 


Died 4 Sep 1995 | Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


12 Mar 1941 SLAKE 


Buried 8 Sep 1995 ! Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BICI 


wife's father John Samuel WEEKES-25 


MRIN: 2 | 


wife's mother Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVER-1 349 




Children List each child in order of birth. | lds ordinance dates Temple 


J^ 


Sharon PIQUET-3 




Bom 9 Apr 1942 ; Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 May 1950 1 1 


Chr 7Jun1942| 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


28 Dec 1964 IFALL 


Died 12 Oct 1999 


place Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah 


SealPar 


BICI 


Buried 16 Oct 1999 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 


spouse Artell Leon HARRIS-1 1 56 


MRIN: 3 


i Married 20 Oct 1962 I Place Ucon. Bonneville. Idaho. USA ]seais P 


28 Dec 1964! IFALL 


F jJoanPIQUET-1 




Bom 13 Mar 1944 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 May 1952! 




Chr. 9 Apr 1944 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


24Auq1965l IFALL 




Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC I 




Buried Place 






spouse Carl Bruce NYKAMP-1381 


MRIN: 563 




Married 26 Aua 1965 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho Iseaisp 


26Auo1965l IFALL 


F Idonna Marie PIQUET-1297 




Bom 29 Jul 1945 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


28 Nov 1953 I 




Chr. 2 Sep 1945 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


19 Nov 1966 [ IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried 


Place 




spouse Robert Douglas MURRAY-40 17 


MRIN: 445 




Married 26 Dec 1969 (D) i Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho, USA I Seaisp 


26 Dec 1969! IFALL 


F i Cherrie Kathleen PIQUET-4 




Bom 29 Jul 1946 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


28 Sep 1954 






Chr 29 Sep 1946 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


18 Dec 1976 


SLAKE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse Gordon Jav ALLEN- 1 1 38 


MRIN: 4 




Married 20 Dec 1976 ! Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake. Utah. USA |seais P 


20 Dec 1976! SLAKE 


F 


Nola Jean PIQUET-5 




Bom 29 Oct 1947 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Feb 1956! 


chr. 1 Feb 1951 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


9 May 1970 ] SLAKE 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 


Buried 


Place 


spouse David Bruce BRYAN-26 


MRIN: 5 


Married 27 Apr 1973 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah. USA I seaisp 


27 Apr 1973! SLAKE 


Spouse David Bruce BRYAN-4577 


MRIN: 6 




Married 27 Apr 1973 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah I Seaisp 


27 Apr 1973 SLAKE 


! M 


Roger Newell PIQUET-6 


I 


Bom 24 Dec 1948 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


23 Feb 1957^ 


i 


chr 6 Mar 1949 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


29 Dec 1967! IFALL 




Died 27 May 1978 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BICI 




Buried 30Mav1978 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison. Idaho 


Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 


E-mail address carl(Q)srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date prepared 4 Apr 2006 


8340! USA 



239 



6 
7 






Family Group Record- 1 






Page 2 of 2 


Husband Newell Augustus PIQUET-1 04 






wife Madonna WEEKES-2 

■ ■ 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


I 
LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M ! Roger Newell PIQUET-6 








spouse Analee SPENCER-1 1 51 




MRIN: 7 


Married 22 Jun 1973 ! Place St. Georae. Washington, Utah. USA 


SeaISp 


22 Jun 1973 1 SGEOR 


F I Marilyn Carma PIQUET-7 










Bom 9 Apr 1951 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 May 1959 






Chr. 3 Jun 1951 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


9 Dec 1972 


SLAKE 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 








Spouse Clarke Bernell NIELSEN-3275 




MRIN: 8 




Mamed 15 Dec 1972 I Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


15 Dec 1972 I SLAKE 


8 


F Carol lenePIQUET-8 






Bom 1 Auq 1952 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


27 Aug 1960 






cur. 7 Sep 1952 


place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


25 Mav 1973 


OGDEN 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse DEAN HIPWELL-30 




MRIN: 9 




Married 25 Mav 1973 Place Oqden, Weber, Utah 


SeaISp 


25 Mav 1973 OGDEN 


9 


F 


Darlene Susan PIQUET-9 






Bom 24 Jul 1955 


Place Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 Aug 1963 j 




chr 4 Sep 1955 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


18 Sep 1975 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 


Place 




spouse Lance Bradshaw STOKER-3278 




MRIN: 11 




I Married 18 Sep 1975 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


SeaISp 


18 Sep 1975 I IFALL 


10 


M 


Vernon John PIQUET-1 






Bom 21 Sep 1956 


Place Riqby, Jefferson, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 Oct 1964 I 




Chr. 4 Nov 1956 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


18 Sep 1975 SLAKE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


bicT 


i 


Buried 


Place 






Spouse Cynthia HARENBERG-3944 




MRIN: 12 






Married 19 Mav 1978 Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


19 Mav 1978 I SLAKE 


11 


M ! Spencer Lane PIQUET-1 1 






Bom 16 Jan 1961 


Place Riqby, Jefferson, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Feb 1969 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Apr 1980 


SLAKE 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 










spouse Sherianne FRAZIER-3946 




MRIN: 13 


Married 29 Apr 1983 (D) ! Place MESA. Maricopa, Arizona. USA 


SeaISp 


29 Apr 1983 i MESA 



240 




Newell and Madonna Piquet 









!k m? 












1 -m feSH 


*% 














1 ~^J/t 


C^ 




T'tS* m 






"4 ■ 


1 ' 




) 


flB » * 1 


■ r 1 




- * 


Mi '"""^S 


if 




4 




r 









Standing: L-R: Cherrie, Joan, Madonna, Sharon, Idonna 
Front: Nola, Marilyn, Newell, Carol, Roger Piquet 



241 




242 




Back: Bob & Idonna Murray, Dave & Nola Bryan, Artell & Sharon Harris, Spencer & 
Sheri Ann Piquet, Joan & Carl Nykamp, Cindy & Vernon Piquet, Carol & Dean Hipwell. 
Front: Clarke & Marilyn Nielsen, Lance & Darlene Stoker, Newell &Madonna Piquet, 
Analee Piquet, Cherrie & Gordon Allen 




Back Left: Joan, Idonna, Cherrie, Nola, Sharon, Analee Knudsen, Marilyn, 
Carol, Darlene, Cindy & Vernon Piquet. Front: Newell & Shirley Piquet 



243 



NEWELL & MADONNA WEEKES PIQUET 

Madonna's Childhood - Madonna Piquet was born in the home of her parents on 
February 5, 1919 at Sunnydell, Madison County, Idaho. She was the youngest of eleven 
children born to John Samuel and Ida Isabel Grover. She was baptized in the swimming pool at 
Ricks College on February 5, 1927 and confirmed the next day. Her parents had built a new 
two-story frame home five years earlier, with indoor plumbing, electricity and a telephone. It 
had a large yard with dozens of cottonwood, plum, apple and pear trees. Calves and lambs 
trimmed the grass in the orchard, through which you would pass on your way to the garden, full 
of strawberry, raspberry, gooseberry and currant bushes. Her mother worked hard for a yard full 
of beautiful flowers and a comfortable home full of nice things. 

She wrote, "On the lawn, hung between two big trees, was a rope swing. It hung about 
thirty of more feet in the air. This was my favorite thing - to work up high into the tree 
branches. I would recommend a swing like that for every child." 

As a child she fed lambs and calves and learned how to milk cows when she was nine. 
She used to herd cows, driving them to the pasture, a chore she enjoyed unless she worried about 
thunder and lightning so far away from the house. She spent time weeding potatoes and 
thinning and hoeing beets. It was also her job to brush or comb and scratch her mother's and 
father's hair once or twice a week. When she was about twelve, she would soak her parent's 
feet, clip their toenails and then trim the dead skin from them. 

Madonna started school when she was five, in the fall of 1924. She grew quickly 
accustomed to being the teacher's pet. Ben Ovard, her seventh grade teacher, was her favorite. 

"He was young, good looking, athletic and wore cologne that smelled so good. About 
four of us girls had a crush on him - each thinking we were his favorite. It was a real blow in 
the spring to find out he was getting married to a very pretty lady!" 

"The most fun we had during the year was in early August when we went 
huckleberrying. We packed the wagon, with iron tires, with food, bedding, buckets, hay for the 
horses and everything we needed to stay for about five days in the hills. Relatives and friends 
went and we camped close together. At night we played games, put skits on, etc. One night 
some of the fellows (boy friends) were playing tricks on the girls. They chased one boy up a 
tree and started a fire under it. 

She attended her first year of high school in Rexburg and the rest in Driggs, Idaho. 
During that time she stayed with her sister and her husband, Maude and Gerald. They were very 
good to her and she became a part of their family, but sometimes she got homesick for her folks, 
traveling the 60 miles home just once or twice a month. She graduated from high school early 
and graduated from Ricks College in the fall of 1937, ready to teach school. 

"One of my required classes was Physics. There were two girls and twenty-three fellows 
in our class. Since we girls knew nothing about Physics the fellows just carried us through the 
class. In one of our first Physics classes I felt a pin stick in me very hard. I was shocked and 
almost jumped to my feet. The fellow across the aisle had been playing with it and accidentally 
flipped it at me. This started a good friendship with him, Rowden (Bill) Stolworthy. He was 
popular and had a girl in every class. He made my two years at Ricks enjoyable. He was my 
first real boy friend and I learned how proud it made me feel to be with someone who was clean 
and honorable. I didn't care to go with anyone else, but I did go with a few others. My parents 
liked Bill almost as much as I did. One spring day my parents let us take their 1934 Chevrolet to 
Jackson, Wyoming. Ruth Roberts, Wilbur Atwood, Bill and I had an exciting day. We had a 
boat ride on Jennie's Lake, ran out of gas and slid down snow banks up on the pass." 



244 



After they graduated from Ricks, Bill went to BYU to college. They wrote letters for a 
while, then she started dating and quit writing to him. She wrote lots of applications to find a 
teaching job, but she was only 18 and most of the trustees wanted somebody older. Finally she 
was hired by Sterling Murdock, Dick Buxton and Augustus Piquet, trustees at Bates in Teton 
County. She started teaching the first, second and fourth grades in 1937. She boarded in the 
Piquet home. Newell graduated from high school the same year. 

He wrote, "The summer after graduation 1 went to work on the Snake River Ranch in 
Jackson Hole. My brother Gene worked there and got me the job. 1 worked on the dumprake 
bunching the hay all summer. During the winter of 1937 and spring of 1938 I helped around 
home and didn't find work.'"' 

During her second year teaching. Madonna's father needed to hire a man and asked for 
her recommendation of someone. She asked Newell and he began working for $30 a month in 
Archer for John Weekes. 

"I always had a close relationship with Madonna's parents because of my ability to get 
things done. It wasn't until about 1939 after I had worked at her father's farm for two years, that 
I even got interested in Madonna." 

Through his school years, Newell had been very small. He weighed about one hundred 
and twenty pounds and was quite short when he graduated, but over the next couple of years he 
grew to be over six foot and put on some weight. He had known Madonna since 1935 when she 
had come to Driggs to live with her sister Maude. She stayed with her to help her with her 
young family and went to high school. 

"We did some sleigh riding and skiing. Once a week we went sleigh riding and then to 
the Bishop's house for homemade ice cream and cookies. When it was cold we'd ride sleighs, 
toboggans and skis down the hill. The skis I had were never much good. They broke easily. 
We made them out of pone wood and soaked them so we could arch them in front and then 
strapped them on. We also made skis out of barrel slats and strapped them on. When they were 
waxed and oiled they gave a pretty good ride. When the moon was bright we would often ski 
until bedtime. I remember one night Madonna was there too. It was her first time on skis and 
she went straight down the hill about 50 miles per hour, but she managed not to fall." 

"She was almost full grown at a young age and I was just a little boy. She had gotten her 
teaching certificate at eighteen years of age and was out looking for a school. She tried several 
places, but they thought she was too young. My father was the chairman of our little Bates 
school when she came looking for work. They decided she was mature enough and gave her the 
job. Madonna and Miss Neely were together that year and boarded at our place. I used to haul 
them to town and different places in my 1 93 1 Model A Ford. They would pay the gas and give 
me a show ticket. Madonna had been taller than me and was more like a big sister. I took them 
to the show many times, but it was not dating." 

"While attending Sunday School class it was decided that we should have a girl's choice 
party down in the timber where a place was provided for marshmallow and wiener roasts, along 
with games. I knew that one of the girls I had little respect for would likely ask me. Sure 
enough, she did, and I sure hated to tell her I had another date, which was not the truth. I had a 
real struggle to know what to do. I said to Madonna, W I am in a real pickle, could you just help 
me out and go to the party with me?' I guess I became quite interested in her after a fun time 
together at the party." 

"I don't know, but I think women try to play hard to get. She kept me guessing for some 
time, but finally she decided I would be all right for her. She never enjoyed dancing very much. 



245 



so we did a lot of other things, especially attending shows. We were very much in love and 
wanted to be together every chance we got." 

"We were married on March 12, 1941 in the Salt Lake Temple. She had very high 
morals, so we were very happy when we got our temple recommends and could say we were 
morally clean." 

Their honeymoon was spent visiting with Mrs. Piquet's relatives in Grantsville. When 
they got back to Archer the family was at her parents' house waiting for them. They had a 
shower and refreshments and a reception at the church in Bates. They had a wedding cake and, 
as the custom, sat on a blanket in the center of the cultural hall and opened their gifts. After that 
they danced the rest of the evening. 

Newell's Childhood - Newell Augustus Piquet was born on January 13, 1920 to Mary 
Martin and Augustus Constance Piquet in their home in Bates, Teton, Idaho. The sixth of eight 
children, he was blessed on July 4, 1920, baptized on June 28, 1931, confirmed a week later, and 
sealed to his parents on June 29, 1949 in the Idaho Falls Temple. 

At first he lived in a log home on a 100-acre farm at the foot of a hill with berry patches, 
a yard of beautiful flowers and a large garden. The family worked together to make money; 
milking cows and raising chickens for butter and eggs to sell and raising raspberries, 
strawberries, carrots, radishes and other garden produce. Because of drought and crop failures, 
the family had to move a few times, losing everything; starting over. 

He wrote, "Winters were hard in Bates and there was a lot of snow. It covered the fences 
over and the drifts were quite high. One winter morning we woke up late and it seemed like it 
was dark out. We opened the door and there was a wall of snow. We tunneled up to the roof 
and then couldn't see the barn. We poked sticks down in the snow to find the barn and then 
tunneled down to it to take care of the animals, hoping they hadn't suffocated." 

"When I was eight years old or so I would build wagons in the summer. There was an old 
binder in the weeds nearby. I took the wheels off and made an axle out of pine poles. They 
were pretty good carts. I fixed one so that I could guide it and also put a board across that was 
fastened on with two gate hinges. I could push back the board and it would hit the wheels to 
stop me. One day Darrell Woods pulled me behind his black pony at a dead run. At the first 
crossroad he turned the corner and the first thing I knew I was eating dust and seeing stars. He 
sat there and just laughed. I was sure mad and never really trusted him again. 

"I wanted to make a cart that I could stand on and make go down the road. I took the 
gears off the binder and fastened one gear to the wheels and one to a crank handle like the 
railroad guys used. All I had to work with was wood and when I put enough pressure on it to 
make it work, I just broke the wood. I never did get a good ride. My dad never did discourage 
me or stop me even when I took boards off buildings!" 

And like any young man, he got into his share of mischief. 

"When I was twelve years old I got my first car. It was an under-slung Model T Ford 
Bug, so it rode low to the ground to corner better and was a little hopped up to increase the 
power. At the time, gasoline was twenty five cents a gallon, oil fifteen cents a quart, tires eight 
to ten dollars each and a large can of patching was a dollar and a half to two dollars. Calloused 
hands and tired backs were for free. A good pair of wolverine shoes were four dollars. The car 
was out in the weeds in Grover's yard west of Driggs. The weeds were as high as the tires. I 
went in and asked if it was for sale. They knew my mother grew and sold raspberries so they 
said they would give it to me for two or three dishpans full of raspberries." 

"Two or three of my friends helped me start it and we drove it around all day. It was the 
Fourth of July, 1932. The tires weren't very good and one of them developed a crack. A 



246 



balloon of air from the tube came through the tire so I took off my wide leather belt, we pushed 
the balloon back in and strapped my belt around it two or three times and drove it the rest of the 
day. There was one seat across the front boards behind for the kids to sit on. If 1 screwed the 
choke open, I could drive up to the top of Jackson Pass in high gear." 

"1 began working quite steadily in the summers at about 16 years; plowing, summer 
fallowing, planting grain and milking a bunch of cows before and after the day's work. My first 
steady job was working for Elba Wood, who lived just a half a mile down from our house. He 
lived in the mouth of Mahogany Canyon and had a lot of good grazing area for livestock. Our 
daily schedule was: up at 4:30 to milk about 25 cows, between us all, out in an open corral, then 
hitch up two four-horse teams and eat breakfast. We were out to work by eight o'clock. He 
farmed 320 acres. When we would quit combining at night we would load up two wagons full 
of sacked oats and head for home. They all had to be dumped into a bin by hand. I used to think 
there must be some better kind of work, but in those days we never dared complain or quit a job 
because we felt so lucky to find anything to do. It seemed like there was always someone 
looking for work. This job paid a dollar a day and room and board. I felt blessed to get it." 

Newell attended high school in Driggs. He enjoyed going to the dances, attending 
wrestling matches and basketball games and woodworking class. He won a ribbon with a 
checker table he made in class. 

"In school I did quite well in typing. As I was finishing high school the County Agent 
came to school and asked our teacher to recommend a secretary for him. I was the top typist in 
my junior year and second highest in my senior year. I could type about ninety works per 
minute. I worked for him for about a month, but I wanted to be out of doors so much and felt so 
tied down, that I told him I wanted to quit and he reluctantly let me go." 

Times were so hard that they could scarcely afford a room to batch in Driggs. One year 
he and his brother Gene walked from their brother Martin's home at the Teton River to school 
all winter. It was very common to get down to twenty or thirty below zero there. 

"The roads were poor and many times we wondered if we would ever make it. I 
graduated from school there in 1937 and that was to be my last schooling. I would have loved to 
go to college, but times were too hard. Missions were never even talked about in our home 
because of the meager living we had at that time. 

Life Together - Three weeks after they were married, Newell went to work at the Ford 
Garage in Driggs and Madonna finished out the school year teaching second grade. Then an 
opportunity to move close to her folks and rent a garage there arose, and Newell went into 
business for himself. He rented 40 acres to farm and worked for Madonna's father in return for 
the use of machinery. They later bought the ground for $4,000. During the summer his brothers 
Gene and Monte came and helped; sleeping in the granary. 

A few years later Newel needed a shop to work in, so they went to the bank to borrow six 
or seven hundred dollars to build it. Warren Widdison was the banker. When Newell went in he 
said, "Aren't you the one who gave a tithing check last year in over draft?" Newell thought that 
was the end of that but the banker said, "Anyone who would give his last dollar for tithing can 
have a loan at my bank anytime!" Newell was able to use that for block for their new home. 

In 1945 the war was on and they were drafting everyone about my age. I was called to go 
and went down to Fort Douglas for processing. I had a health checkup and two or three doctors 
pulled me aside and said that there was something not quite right about my back. They talked 
about it for awhile and then said I was okay to go. We tried to find a way that I could stay home 
with Madonna and the kids but couldn't do it. I was at the Idamont Hotel in Rexburg and the bus 
was there to pick us up when I heard my name called out. I went over to see what they wanted 



247 



and they said that I wouldn't need to go. The farmers had signed a petition saying they needed 
me to fix their machinery. 

"On one trip after poles to make corral posts, we went over Lime Kiln Canyon. I had the 
power horse tractor chained down on the truck. George, Lynn and Chester Nelson went with me 
to help. We loaded the truck with long poles and put on all we dared, then we chained them to 
the truck. We left the tractor there to help with the next load and headed home. As we crossed 
Moody Creek and started up the hill the front tires of the truck came up off the ground and the 
long end of the poles in back were on the ground. I went and got the tractor and chained it to the 
bumper to hold the truck down and pulled the truck to the top. Lynn and Chester sat on the front 
fenders for weight but the front wheels only touched the road occasionally. George rode inside 
with me and when we got home he looked at me and said, 'That's the most hair-raising ride I 
ever took/ I thought it was kind of fun. I hadn't felt that we were in any real danger." 

"1 was working long hours in the garage there in Archer and I started having real bad 
headaches. Sometimes when I went out to work I'd go into a cold sweat. It would just run off 
my face and I'd have to lean against a post for a while. Sometimes I'd just lie on the bed. My 
time wasn't my own, either. There was always someone who needed something done. We 
decided to quit the mechanic work and buy a farm." 

Madonna wrote, "In the summer of 1952 we decided that we were not happy with our 
situation. We had a real good potato crop and sold them for $3.25 per hundred that year. Newell 
had been having headaches that we felt were due to the fumes in the garage. We also felt that it 
would be a better situation to raise our family on a farm, so we began looking for one. 

"We found a farm for sale near Ucon, Idaho. We took Father and Brother Larsen down 
to see it. It was a bit high priced but they both felt that it was a good farm. Brother Larsen felt 
the kernels of wheat and said, 'This is good productive land'." 

They bought the one hundred and sixty acres for $68,000 and sold their home and farm in 
Archer to Ursel for $25,000. After they moved to Ucon the headaches stopped. 

Newell wrote, "Our first season on the farm was a disaster. When we harvested we got 
about half as much from the whole crop as we paid for the seed and I was behind about $5,000. 
I was not able to make the first payment, but Taylor Lott let me work our my payment by fixing 
his machinery that year. I overhauled several tractors, etc. for him. That is the only year that I 
couldn't make my payment." 

By 1996 that farm had been supplemented by several others, totaling 527 acres. 

Newell wrote, "Over the years we have had a few accidents around the farm, but no 
serious injuries. One day I was working under the car when Roger was just four years old. He 
came out to the garage and happened to turn the knob on the end of the jack handle that was 
holding the car up. The car dropped and came down with the frame on the side of my face. The 
wheel rim kept it from dropping far enough to crush my head. Somehow he was able to turn the 
knob back and lift the car off of me. My face hurt for a few days, but not to serious." 

"Another time, as we were backing out of the driveway to go to Yellowstone Park, I 
decided to move my big jack from the back of the truck and into the garage. Somehow it slipped 
and all 100 pounds of it landed on my big toe, crushing it and splitting the toe nail away from my 
toe all the way around. I soaked it and Mom poured turpentine over it and wrapped it. We cut 
the toe out of one of my shoes and headed for Yellowstone. It was real sore, but healed fine." 

Madonna wrote, "One day when Nola was about eight months old, I laid her on my bed 
to nap and went out to pick strawberries. I was prompted to go and check on her a couple of 
times. When I did go in, I could hear her, but could not find her. We found her in the cold air 



248 



vent behind the bed. She had wiggled enough to be down in the vent pretty tight. It was a 
frightening experience, but I was grateful for the prompting." 

Newell wrote, "We bought a Ferguson tractor with the lug wheels to do work in the 
fields. One day Roger was out pulling the leveler with it. I looked out the dining room window 
and saw him barely moving along with the front wheels hardly touching the ground; the leveler 
was full of dirty. With the lug wheels the tractor will flip over just as fast as the wheel is turning. 
1 ran as fast as 1 could go and caught him before it went over. If it had flipped, he never could 
have gotten off in time and would have been crushed. " 

"One day I was working on the combine on the cement outside the garage door. I had 
the big tire off. Roger was helping me and had put several blocks to hold the combine. I asked 
him if the blocks were in good and he said, 'You bet." As I was working, something said to me, 
'Get out from under here now!' I slid out as quickly as I could. One of the blocks had been 
soaked with oil and was slipping on the cement. The block flipped and the combine dropped to 
the cement, catching my belt as I slid and pulling me down as it went, but not hurting me. The 
wheel hub left an inch-deep chip in the cement." 

"Another accident happened to Idonna. She had stopped in the field, with the tractor 
pulling the bailer, using the clutch, but forgot to take it out of gear. So when she jumped off the 
tractor it started to move. She fell when she jumped and the tire on the tractor ran over her 
doubled-up leg across the calf and thigh, kind of spinning on her leg as it went over it. I ran and 
got our old DeSoto limousine car and carried her to it. I stopped at the house to call the doctor 
and tell him we were coming so he could be ready. She was fussing that she didn't want any 
doctor. She met me as I came out of the house. No doctor was going to work on her. She would 
not go to any doctor and was just fine." 

"One last accident to tell about happened to Nola one fall as we were harvesting potatoes. 
The digger would send the dirt, potatoes, vines etc. up the chain where the dirt would be shaken 
off. Several "clod pickers" would ride on the sides to get the clods that didn't break up. Another 
chain and roller would catch the vines and get rid of them. Nola got her fingers caught between 
the chain and roller (with a scant inch of clearance in the middle) and they were pulled right on 
through up to her armpit before I could get it stopped. Examination at the hospital revealed only 
bruises. 

Newell wrote, " It has been a good experience to raise our family on the farm. They all 
learned to work and have been a joy to us. They have all married in the temple and five have 
filled missions. All have gone to college, from one to four years." 

"In 1952 I was called to be in the bishopric in Archer, Idaho, with Bernar Erickson as 
bishop and Loren Grover as first counselor. I served with them for about a year before we 
moved. Elder Mark E. Peterson ordained me a high priest. He was ordained by Heber J. Grant, 
who was ordained by George Q. Cannon, who was ordained by Brigham Young, who was 
ordained by Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery, who was ordained by Peter, James and John, 
who were ordained by Jesus Christ." 

"I've never been without a church calling since I was married; Elder's Quorum 
Presidency, Ward Genealogical Chairman, in Sunday School, counselor in a bishopric. Young 
Men's President, Stake Sunday School Presidency, Finance Chairman, Teacher in Sunday 
School and Priest's Quorum. My temple calling has been the climax of all good callings. I felt it 
was also the busiest time of my life. At first I hesitated and tried to stall before I went to be set 
apart. I worked for at least 15 years before the film was put in. I have been blessed to memorize 
and take part in almost all of the things that have taken place there. Probably my most spiritual 
experiences have happened in the temple. I have felt the spirit so strong and have been prompted 



249 



in my work. I also understand and have a testimony that we need the help of the Lord in all these 
things. I have learned to leave my worldly problems behind and enjoy the spirit there. 1 hope to 
some day arrange my affairs so that I can spend two days a week there." 

Madonna waited until after Spencer left on his mission to join in working at the temple. 
She worked in various places for a year and a half before being assigned to be assistant 
supervisor, then the same span again before being called as the supervisor. She wrote of the 
experience: " I liked being at the front desk and helping everyone who came in but at first the 
prayer meetings frightened me. I did get used to taking charge of them and then it was 
something I enjoyed. The best part about the temple was the opportunity I had to get to know the 
temple presidencies, especially the matrons. They treat you with such love and respect and 
always with words of praise. One Friday night I had sent everyone up to work and the temple 
was crowded, then a bus load came from Pocatello. I went to the clothes dispensary and got 
hangars and went along and gave each sister a hanger to use in the booth and then put their 
purses in the closet. Sister Jones thought it was a wonderful idea that would solve the problem 
of limiting the number of guests for a wedding. She said that now the number of guests invited 
for a wedding need not be limited. She put the suggestion in the Temple Book." 

"The other best part of working at the temple was the friendship you developed with the 
sisters you worked with. Our Friday night group was probably one of the closest of all the 
Friday groups; we had parties about three times a years. We came to love President and Sister 
Harris so much. On a trip back to the temple after they were released, President Harris gave me 
a hug and told me how much he loved and appreciated us. He said, 'Newell is my kind of man.' 
President Jones was asked what he would do with all these people when they came in here, so 
many, this late at night. He said, Til just go home and let Newell take care of them." 

Newell wrote, "Everyone tells me I'm a living miracle after the train wreck. I didn't even 
know what happened until after I was taken care of and in bed. 1 should have died or been 
paralyzed by all reasonable diagnosis. I was taking a load of grain to Osgood and the roads were 
just a glare of ice. I saw the train (but heard no horn and saw no lights) and skidded for about 
500 feet. I thought I could miss the train, but it slowed down and I clipped the back of it.'"' 

"It took the cab right off the truck and drug it quite a ways. I was trapped inside for a 
while; they did a good job removing me from the wreck because my neck was broken like I had 
been hung and they could have done real damage if they hadn't done things just right. I had a 
dislocated hip and broken pelvis. Several ribs and my collarbone were also broken. My neck 
was crushed. I didn't have to have surgery to set any bones or anything. They all stayed right in 
place and healed that way." 

"I was in the hospital for about three weeks. Mom got so upset with the way they took 
care of me in rehab that after one day and one night we left. She wrote, 'We had been told that 
we would have to be very careful but that I could undo the collar and shave him while he lay on 
the bed. One day a nurse came in and was determined that he was to get up and learn to shave. I 
was just as determined that he would not. She was quite disgusted that I would not allow him to 
do it. After about a week we went up to the fifth floor and had therapy in his room. He got good 
care there, but we felt that it was necessary to stay and keep on eye on nurses, technicians and 
therapists. Newell wanted me to be there with him all the time. He would ask when I would be 
back in the morning and thought that 8:00 was pretty late in the day!" 

"I spent four months flat on my back; then used crutches and a walker for a while. 1 was 
supposed to wear my neck brace for six months, but after four I got so tired of it that I took it off. 
1 have recovered until I am about as good as new. I still have stiffness in my neck and my leg 
and hip bother me a little if I do too much, but that is about it." 



250 



"Mom has worked hard through the years and never complained about her part of the 
work, but always encouraged the family to keep busy and learn to do everything. She wrote, 
These years were busy years -cleaning, washing, cooking for a family of thirteen. Washing was 
done through the years with a double tub Dexter and we hung them on the line to dry. I always 
loved to see a beautiful clean wash blowing in the breeze. It has always been important to me to 
have clothes clean and whites white. There was always a large ironing to do.'" 

Of 1951 she wrote, " We had seven kids in ten years. It was quite an undertaking to get 
them ready for church. On Saturday night we gave them all a bath and then curled their hair in 
pin curls, usually curling it around my finger and putting pins in it so they could sleep on it." 

"We had kids in MIA and school activities. We usually took the kids of several 
neighbors to MIA, softball. Primary and after school practices with us. We also had a big garden 
with the watering and weeding. Summertime brought canning and freezing - bushels and 
bushels of fruit - quarts and quarts of beans and corn. In the fall there were carrots and potatoes 
to store." 

Madonna wrote, "Newell was always a good farmer, seeing that things were done when 
they needed to be done and done right. He kept good records and took good care of his 
machinery. After we bought the Phillips place, Newell was made director of the McGill Ditch. 
He has spent many years carefully working out the many problems with water. No one else 
could keep the peace like he has. He has the respect of all. " 

"During these years Father would come and stay with us for a month or more at a time. 
His health was beginning to fail and he sometimes would have meals in bed. He was good to 
help teach the kids. He built a little stool so they could reach to do the dishes when we lived in 
Archer. He liked to see dishes done quickly before the food dried on. He was always conscious 
of teaching them to be thrifty. He wound strings from flour sacks into balls of twine and 
straightened bent nails. He sat near the ironing board and taught the skills of ironing, white 
shirts and all. He helped teach the kids to sweep and mop the floors so that they were clean 
when the job was done. He could sharpen a pencil to perfection with his pocketknife. Father 
was always after the kids to take responsibility to learn how to do things right and then be 
responsible to see when it needed to be done and do it. It was done in a way that did not cause 
feelings, just learning. What a legacy. " 

Newell wrote, "I love to read church books, the Reader's Digest and newspapers, I guess 
to see if my name is in the obituaries. I guess I've always enjoyed figuring out how to build 
things like machinery. Another thing I really enjoy is fishing up the canyon. I love the 
mountains. I have quite enjoyed going on huckleberry trips up Kelly Canyon. Some of our most 
fun times with the family go back to April Conference time when we would go up by Heise and 
picnic while we listened to Conference on the car radio." 

"I am most happy that we finally took time to go on many good trips. One thing I really 
enjoy is getting on the road and traveling, just to see what there is to see. I love to visit museums 
and historic areas; especially pioneer museums to see how things were." 

Madonna wrote, "We love to travel with Lucille and Orval Avery. We have been 
through the Whitehouse, Mint, Civil War Museum, Grand Of Opry, Nauvoo. Adam-Ondi- 
Ahman and the temple in Georgia to name a few. I have been to 15 temples and Newell has 
been to 15." 

"We went on a trip to Hawaii with Clarke, Marilyn and their family, and Keith and Opal 
also went with us. Lance had accumulated enough flying hours that it paid most of our airplane 
tickets. It was Opaf s first airplane trip and she was scared to death at first. They had never done 
anything like that before. We went to the temple there; we went to the Polynesian Cultural 



251 



Center. We stayed in Kauai and had a hotel on the beach. We shopped in the outdoor markets 
and brought home muumuus. We bought shells and hula dolls and necklaces of shells or seeds." 

He wrote, " We could tell Mom was short on energy for the last several years. She had 
several medical complications, the most serious of which began in 1981 with the discovery of 
breast cancer. Over the next several years she endured chemotherapy, gall stone removal (during 
which the operating doctor mistakenly cut the tube to her liver, draining bile into her insides and 
causing peritonitis), having heart and thyroid problems requiring medication and problems with 
fluid collecting in her lungs." 

She wrote," Through all of this Newell has been so good to take care of me. We spent 
nearly a week in the hospital after I had a mastectomy. A lady in the room with me was so 
crippled and weak that she could not feed herself so Newell fed her meals to her. She mentioned 
several times what a good man he was. I certainly had to agree. 

The morning she died I was just finishing up some work. I went home and Idonna said 
Mom had just passed away. She just shut her eyes and was gone. She wrote, "I have had a good 
seventy six years now. I wouldn't have done anything differently. We have lived during the 
most choice time in history - just the right time - because as we have raised our family there 
were not so many temptations and it was a time when we learned good lessons. All of our 
children have been married in the temple (four weddings in six months was quite an experience) 
and five of them went on missions." 

"We are proud of our children and their children and pray every day that they will stay 
close to the church and live worthy of the blessings that are available to them. We know that 
there is no other way to really be happy. Our greatest desire is to be with them through the 
eternities." 

He wrote, "Mom has been a real stabilizing part of my life. She always was too cautious 
I thought but I guess that's what I needed. The teachers at school always said, "You must have a 
real combination to have children so well behaved and willing to cooperate and help." 

"My testimony is strong. I know that the Lord has blessed us many times and will 
continue to do so. My greatest wish is that my family will all be worthy to be together in the 
Celestial Kingdom one day." 

Newell spent the last seven years of his life with Shirley Hall Jensen Call from Rigby. 
She was born March 13, 1933. They were married July 11, 1996 in the Idaho Falls Temple. 
Soon after their marriage, Shirley was called as a temple worker and accompanied Newell to the 
temple every Friday afternoon, until Newell got so weak he couldn't go anymore. 

Shirley gave birth to eight children and helped raise eleven children, so between them 
there were 22 children to keep in touch with. Shirley and her youngest son, Mike, came to live 
with Newell after their marriage. 

Newell and Shirley supported every family event they could, including weddings, 
baptisms, graduations, baby blessings and sports events. 

Newell enjoyed farming and continued to farm. He planted a crop in the spring of 2003, 
but never lived to see the harvest. He passed away at 83 years of age, on July 17, 2003, and was 
laid to rest in the Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison County, Idaho. 

Written by Carla Murray a granddaughter 
Edited by Joan Nykamp for this publication 



252 



Family Group Record- 21 13 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Artell Leon HARRIS-61 1 1 




Bom 11 Sep 1939 


Place Suqar City, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple ; 


chc 14 Oct 1939 


Place Sugar City, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 1 May 1948 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 28 Dec 1964 I FALL 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 11 NOV 1954! 




Married 20 Oct 1962 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho. USA 


seaisp 28 Dec 1964; IFALL 




otherspouse Shanna SCHOFIELD-10323 


MRIN: 1269 


Mamed 7 Sep 2002 Tpkce Timpanoqas. Utah. Utah 


SeaISp 


Husband's father Leon James HARRIS-61 01 


MRIN: 2110 ! 


Husbanrfsmother Elma ROBISON-6086 


! 


wife Sharon PIQUET-746 




Bom 9 Apr 1942 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




Chr 7Jun1942 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 6 May 1950 




Died 12 Oct 1999 


place Pleasant Grove, Utah 


Endowed 28 Dec 1964 i IFALL 




Buried 16 Oct 1999 


p»ace Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar BIC 



Wife'sjather 
Wife's mother 



New ell Augustus PIQUET-5 046 



MRIN: 224 



Madonna WEEKES-745 



Children List each child in order of birth. 



LDS ordinance dates 



Temple 



F iTerri Dee HARRIS-9023 



Bom 
iChr. 



Died 



Buried 



19 Mar 1963 
5 May 1963 



P lace Rexbur g, Madison, Idaho, USA 



Ptace Id aho Falls, Bonnev ill e, Idaho, USA 



Place 



Bapuzed 27 Mar 1971: j 

Endowed 6 Sep 1984 l IFALL j 
SealPar 28 Dec 1964 i IFALL j 



Place 





spouse Todd Frank JOHNSTON-8929 




MRIN: 21 16; 




Married 9 Jul 1981 I Ptace Ucon. Bonneville. Idaho. USA 


SeaISp 


6 Sep 1984 ' IFALL 1 


F 


Jonna Marie HARRIS-9024 




Bom 29Jun1965 


Place Hemet, Riverside, California, USA 


Baptized 


30Jun1973i 




Chr. 9 Sep 1965 


pi** Hemet, Riverside, California, USA 


Endowed 


25 Sep 1993i LANGE i 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BlCi 




Buried 


Place 




I 

! 




Spouse 




Married | Place 


SeaISp 


i i 


M 


Richard Artell HARRIS-9492 




Bom 14Jun1967 


Place Hemet, Riverside, California, USA 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1975 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 
SealPar 


29 Jul 1986! IFALL S 




Died 


Ptace 


BIC: 




Buried 


Place 









Spouse 


Jennifer CLINGER-8931 




MRIN: 3131 i 




Married 


14 Oct 1989 


Ptace Los Anaeles. Los Anaeles. California, USA 


SeaISp 


14 Oct 1989 LANGE -1 ! 


M 


Steven James HARF 


tlS-9491 




Bom 


26 Dec 1971 


Place Hemet, Riverside, California, USA 


Baptized 


5 Jan 1980: 


i 


Chr. 


30 Jan 1972 


Ptace Hemet, Riverside. California, USA 


Endowed 


4 Jan 1991 i LANGE j 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 


Buried 


Place 




I 


Spouse 
Married 


Laura June HAWKES-8930 




MRIN: 3722 ; 


28 Dec 1995 


Place LOGAN. Cache. Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


28 Dec 1995 ! LOGAN 



F ! Cynthia Michelle HARRIS-8016 



Bom 



11 Oct 1975 



Ptace Idaho Falls, Bonnev ille, Idaho, USA 



Chr. 



19 Oct 1975 



Died 
Buried 



Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 

Ptace 



Baptized 
Endowed 
SealPar 



5 Nov1983 I 
ilAugJ996i BO UNT 
BIC! 



Place 



Spouse 
Married 



Richie Dell SMITH-9576 



MRIN: 3129 



23 Auo 1996 I Ptace Bountiful. Davis. Utah. USA 



seaisp 23 Aug 1996 



6 i M I Kevin Charles HARRIS-9020 



Bom 

jDted 
Buried 



1 

I D 



1 Nov 1977 

4 Dec 1977 



Place Idaho F alls, Bonnev ille, Idaho, USA 



Place Ucon. Bonneville, Idaho, USA 



Place 
Place 



Bapuzed 30 NOV 1 985 ' 

Endowed 2 Nov 1 996 f MTIMP 

SealPar BIC 



Spowe Kimbertv RUNOLFSON-9583 

Married 7 Jul 2001 Tpiace American Fork. Utah. Utah 



SeaISp 



MRIN: 3746 

7 Jul 2001 1 Mf IMP 



F j Kimbertv HARR1S-6096 



Bom 

Chr. 

Died 

I Buried 



8 Jul 1985 
4 Aug 1985 



ptace Idaho Falls . Bonneville. Idaho. USA 
Place Milo, Bonneville, Idaho, U SA 

Place 

Place 



Baptized 
Endowed 
SealPar 



10 Jul 1993 



BIC 



Spouse 
Married 



Hector Alejandro CONTRERAS- 10324 

17 Dec 2004 [Place Provo Courthouse. Provo, Utah 



MRIN: 4103 



SeaISp 



253 





Jonna, Artell and Shana Harris 



Terri and Todd Johnston Family 






Rick and Jennifer Harris Family 



Kim and Hector Contreras 



Artell and Sharon Harris 




Kevin and Kim Harris Family 




Steve and Laura Harris Family 




254 



Cindy and Rich Smith Family 



SHARON PIQUET & ARTELL HARRIS FAMILY 

Sharon was born on April 9, 1942 to Madonna (Weekes) and Newell Augustus Piquet. 
She was born at the George Nelson residence in Archer, Idaho. His wife. Aunt Isabel assisted 
with the birth. Sharon was the first of eleven children and was a beautiful baby with black hair 
and brown eyes. She turned the heads of many, even as a baby and young girl. She had all the 
blessings, responsibilities and privileges of the oldest child. As others came along, she became a 
great help to her mother and dad. Over the next eighteen years Mom had seven more girls and 
three boys. They were: in age order, Joan, Idonna Marie, Cherrie Kathleen, Nola Jean, Roger 
Newell, Marilyn Carma, Carol Ilene, Darlene Susan, Vernon John and Spencer Lane. 

They lived in Archer until October of 1952. Sharon attended school there and had many 
good memories of friends and family. In 1952 the family moved to Ucon, onto a 160 acre farm. 
Living on the farm had its challenges for our Dad and Mom. The first five children were all girls 
so they had to take the place of boys on the farm. Sharon grew up strong physically and capable 
of whatever Dad asked of her. She learned not only to do all the farm work but she could cook 
and sew and clean as well. Dad taught her to drive the tractors and farm equipment at a young 
age and she became very adept at knowing what needed to be done and how to do it. She bucked 
the hay, ran the derrick horse, bucked the spuds, plowed the fields, shoveled the grain, etc. Dad 
depended a great deal on her. 

She was just as good at sewing clothes as she was at sports or farm work. She took Home 
Economics classes and made everything she wore. Sharon had a good eye for color and putting 
fabrics and designs together and she always looked well dressed. Sharon enjoyed reading more 
than anything else as a young girl. She spent every minute she could with a good book, even 
when she should have been sleeping. She would read through to the wee hours of the morning. 
Years later she would have an LDS Book Store in her home in Hemet, California. 

She was popular at school with girls and boys alike. She was in the Pep Club, Debate 
Club, Thespians and involved in many other activities. She worked as a school secretary in the 
office and the Principal could never praise her enough for her good work. She student directed 
"The Diary of Anne Frank", "Smilin' Through" and "Night Must Fall". The director of the plays, 
Miss Mona Caudle wrote a note to Sharon, which said: "You wonderful, dependable girl! I have 
little but praise when I think of you. You have the capacity for getting things done." 

"1 took shorthand classes in high school and did quite well there. It was through my 
shorthand teacher that I met Artell. Artell asked her to get him a date and told her what he 
wanted. She came to me and asked if I would like a blind date with a college student from 
Rexburg. She said I fit his description and thought that maybe for the Harvest Ball I would like 
to go with him. The date was arranged and I nervously waited. I was impressed with him from 
the first date and thoroughly enjoyed his company. When he asked me to go with him again I 
was happy to say yes. He was a real gentleman and we had a good time together. Shortly after I 
graduated from high school he took me over by the temple and asked me to marry him. He gave 
me a beautiful ring and then we went to the dance for the evening." 

Sharon attended LDS Business College in Salt Lake City and graduated from there. After 
dating for four years, Sharon and Artell were married on October 20, 1962. They lived in a small 
white house west of Idaho Falls while Artell worked as a framer. They became proud parents of 
a beautiful little girl whom they named Terri Dee. She looked just like her mother and was the 
first of seven children who came to their family. 



255 



Artell received a job offer in Anaheim, California, which lasted about 6 months. Then he 
got another job offer in Hemet, California. They packed up and moved there in the spring of 
1964. Soon they had built a nice home and enjoyed the good economy for about 10 years. 
During that time Jonna Marie, Richard Artell and Steven James were also born. 

Artell was a general contractor, so they moved as the market changed. They stayed in 
California for 12 years then. 

They moved back to Idaho in 1 975 and built a home near Sharon's parents and spent 1 2 
years there. 

Then it was back to California for 5 more years in Camarillo. 

In 1993 they moved to Pleasant Grove, Utah and lived there until Sharon passed away 
with cancer on October 12, 1999. 

Three years later Artell was introduced, by Sharon's brother Vernon, to Shana Udy, she 
had also lost her husband. Artell and Shana were married shortly after. They are a perfect match. 
They currently live in Mapleton, Utah, in a beautiful new home. Artell did all the finish work. 
He works for a company that makes blinds and shutters. Shana works for the Tahitian Noni 
Corporation as head secretary. 

Sharon and Artell's oldest daughter Terri and her husband Todd Johnston live in Ammon, 
Idaho. They have 6 children: Tiffany (22), Tyson (21), Talicia (17), Taryn (16), Tashlynn (14) 
and Teagen (8). Tiffany is married to Blaine Jemmett and they have a baby girl named Brooklyn 
(10 mo.) and also live in Ammon. Tyson was recently married to Virginia (Jessie) Metcalfe and 
they are currently living in Salt Lake City, UT. Todd is in construction and Terri teaches 
gymnastics in her home. 

Jonna, their second daughter, was born with Spina Bifida and has her share of health 
problems, but is doing well. She does beautiful counted cross-stitch and loves to volunteer at the 
elementary school nearby. 

Rick and Jennifer Harris live in Ramona, California. Rick is a high school art teacher and 
golf coach and has his Masters in Education. As a side job, he is a Chainsaw Artist. He carves 
large wooden sculptures such as bears, Indians, eagles or anything else requested. Jenn spends a 
lot of time at the elementary school volunteering, is a room mom and is on the PTA board. They 
have 3 children: Colton (9), Calvin (7) and Caitlin (4). Rick is the Young Men's President and 
Jenn was just released from the Primary Presidency. 

Steve and Laura Harris live in Ogden, Utah. They have 4 children: Emily (7), Jessica (4), 
Brett (2) and Megan (7 mo.). Steve works at Traco Manufacturing as a Sales Representative and 
Laura is a stay at home mom. Steve is Scout Master and Laura is Humanitarian Aid Specialist. 

Cindy married Rich Smith and with the help of Artell, built a home in Spanish Fork, 
Utah, where they are very happy. They have 3 children: Dallas (6) Micailey (4) and Mackenzie 
(2). Rich works as a Sales Representative for Mity-Lite and Cindy is able to stay at home with 
their children. Rich is the Young Men's President and Cindy is the Enrichment Night Leader. 

Kevin and Kim Harris also live in Orem, Utah. Kevin works for World Financial Group 
as a Financial Planner and Kim is a stay at home mom to their young daughter, Hanna (18 mo.). 
Kevin is Elders Quorum Home Teaching Coordinator and Kim is on the Enrichment Board. 

Kimberly was recently married to Hector Contreras and is now a step mom to his 
daughter Alexandria (3). They live in Provo, Utah and are both working at Tahitian Noni in 
Orem. 

Written by Nola Bryan 2005 



256 



Family Group Record- 1 















Page 1 of 1 


Husb* Bruci KAMP-1 








Bom 22 Apr 1941 | Place Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


j 

I 

i 


chr. 27 Jul 1941 Place Trinity Reformed Church, Grand Rapids, Kent, Michi 


Baptized 


8 Aug 1964] 


Died ! Place 


Endowed 


24 Auq 1965 I I FALL 


Buried I Place 


SealPar 


1 


Married 26 Auq 1965 Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


SeaISp 


26 Auq 1965 I I FALL 


Div Place 






Husband's tamer Robert Richard NYKAMP-8 




MRIN: 8 






Husband's mother Florence Luella DE BOER-9 






wife Joan PIQUET-2 








Bom 13 Mar 1944 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


I 
! 

i 


ci.r. 9 Apr 1944 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 May 1952 j 


Died 


Place 


Endowed 


24 Auq 1965! IFALL 


Buried { Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 


wife's father Newell Auqustus PIQUET-5046 




MRIN: 224 


1 




wife's mother Madonna WEEKES-745 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M ! Bruce Vermeer NYKAMP-3 








Bom 3 Jun 1967 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1975 




i 


Chr 2 Jul 1967 Place Sixth Ward. Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


15 Auq 1986 


IFALL 




Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC1 


i 


Buried j Place 








spouse Jodv Matilda ANDREWS-812 




MRIN: 237 


2 




Mamed 18 Jan 1991 ! Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


25 Jan 1992! IFALL 


F |CarleenNYKAMP-4 








Bom 27 Nov 1968 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Jan 1977i 






Chr 27 Nov 1968 


Place Idaho Fails L. D. S. Hospital Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


24 Nov 1989 | IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BiC! 






Buried 


Place 








spouse Todd Stephen CHRISTENSEN-1 896 




MRIN: 568 




Mamed 20 Mar 1992 ! Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


20 Mar 1992 i IFALL 


3 


M 


Bradlev Graver NYKAMP-5 




Bom 16 Jan 1970 


Place Jackson, Teton, Wyoming 


Baptized 


28 Jan 1978 j 






chr. 23 Feb 1970 


Place Teton Villaqe Road, Teton, Wyominq 


Endowed 


28 Feb 1989 IFALL 




Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 






Buried ! Place 




spouse Stephanie Rachel SMITH-1 982 




MRIN: 561 


4 




Married 14 Sep 1993 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


14 Sep 1993 i SLAKE 


M 


Ryan Marshall NYKAMP-6 




Bom 17 Mar 1975 j Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


26 Mar 1983 






Chr. 30 Mar 1975 j Place Milo Church. Milo Bonneville. Idaho 


Endowed 


3 May 1994 


IFALL 


! 
i 


Died | Place 


SealPar 


. BIC 




Buried ! Place 






spouse Kimberlv Ann BRENNER-3263 




MRIN: 1007 


5 




Married 22 Auq 1998 ! Place Bellevue, Kinq. Washinqton 


SeaISp 


22 Auq 1998! SEATT 


M 


Marion Lee NYKAMP-7 






Bom 30 Oct 1977 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jan 1990] 




Chr. 14 Nov 1977 


Place Milo Church, Milo, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 








Spouse 




Mamed j Place 


SeaISp 


I 



Prepared by 
Phone 



Carl N ykamp 
208-523-7378 



E-maii address carl@ srv.myrf.net 

Date pre pared 17 Mar 2006 



Address 14054_N,55E. 



Jdaho Falls, ldaho_83401 



Unjted States Of America 



257 





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w 


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1\ 


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1 


9m 


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1 ;'. 
1 


I 

' 1 ■ 


' 





Carl and Joan Nykamp Family 
Back: Brad, Bruce, Dallin, Cassidy, Lee, Ryan, Todd Christensen. Middle: Stephanie holding 
Emily, Jody, Joan, Carl, Kimberly holding Kate, Carleen Christensen holding Taya 
Front: Hyrum, Michael, Robert, Cade, Kalli, Ellie, Jacob, Josh, Ty and Troy Christensen 
Malaya Christensen (inserted) 



258 




JOAN PIQUET & CARL NYKAMP FAMILY 

I, Joan Piquet Nykamp was born March 13, 1944, the second daughter of Newell and 
Madonna Piquet, in Archer, Idaho, at the home of Aunt Isabel and Uncle George Nelson. There 
were 1 1 children born into our family. Sharon, Joan, Idonna, Cherri, Nola, Roger, Marilyn, 
Carol, Darlene, Vernon and Spencer. 

The family lived on a small farm in Archer, and Dad had shop where he did mechanic 
work. In 1952 we moved to Ucon, Idaho. I lived on the 160-acre farm until I went to college. 
The boys were all much younger, so the girls did the farm work. We cut, watered, picked and 
hauled potatoes, fed the livestock, worked in the hay, cleaned the garage, etc., along with 
learning to sew, cook, can and do household chores. We did whatever needed to be done inside 
or outside. 

In 1951, during second grade, I came down with Rheumatic Fever and ended up in the 
hospital. Two years later I had Rheumatic Fever again. The doctors said how lucky I was that I 
didn't suffer any heart damage, little did they know at the time that Rheumatic Fever would 
result in three major open heart surgeries and numerous other surgeries, which included having 
my heart stopped about 30 times. It all resulted in the installation of a pace maker in 2002. Life 
has been much easier since then. 

I enjoyed musicals and drama during high school. The highlight of my high school years, 
was when I played Jo in "Little Women". I was editor of the yearbook and Vice President of 
Girls Federation. As high school ended I was awarded a trophy for Homemaker of the year and 
a plaque for being the best Citizen at Bonneville High School. 

Carl attended Colorado University in Boulder, Colorado, and I attended Ricks College in 
Rexburg, Idaho and Utah State in Logan Utah. We both worked in Jackson Hole for the 
summers. We met at a Dude Ranch in 1963. The following summer we returned to Jackson and 
I was able to get the missionaries to teach Carl the gospel. He was baptized August 8, 1964. He 
had a firm testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel and he has never looked back. We dated 
for two and a half years and as soon as Carl had been a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints for a year and graduated from Colorado University we got married. On August 
26, 1965, we were married in the Idaho Falls Temple. 

I taught school for two years, until the birth of our first child, which ended my formal 
teaching career. I kept a current Teacher's certificate for over thirty years and then finally gave 
up the idea of teaching. 

In 1967 we bought a new home in Ucon, Idaho. I thought we were settled in for a long 
time. Bruce was born June 3, 1967 and Carleen was born November 27, 1968. I was very sad 
when I had to pack up and leave for Jackson, Wyoming in 1969. Carl had gotten a job as an 
accountant at the Jackson Hole Ski Resort, so we moved back to Jackson and soon Bradley was 
born on January 16, 1970. 

Carl had always wanted a farm to raise our family on. We soon found a 1 20 acre farm in 
Milo, about 15 miles North East of Idaho Falls. It is located about 5 miles North East of Mom 
and Dad's farm. We moved back to Idaho just after I had my first major heart surgery in 
September 1970. Then, Ryan was born on March 17, 1975 and Lee was born on October 30, 
1977. The children spent many happy, stable years growing up on the farm. We raised hay, 
grain, cows, calves, hogs, chickens and horses. We had a modern hog operation for a few years, 
but soon decided the pressure washer business was the thing to pursue. Thirty-five years have 
passed and we are still living on the farm, however we are renting it out, except for the 30 acres 
of trees that Carl has planted and takes care of. 



259 



In 1984 we started a Landa Pressure Washer business. Carl and I have worked together 
in the business every since. We were able to travel with the Landa Dealers. We've enjoyed 
traveling to Spain, Africa, Ireland, The Netherlands, England, Mexico, Caribbean, Hawaii and 
across most of the United States. Carl and I also enjoyed traveling together. We have been 
blessed to work out of our home and shop for over 20 years. Carl is semi-retired and I am trying 
to figure out how to retire. 

Our four oldest children served missions. Bruce served in the Roanoke, Virginia 
Mission, Carleen in Davo Philippines Mission, Brad in the Indiana, Indianapolis Mission and 
Ryan in the Guatemala City Central Mission. Lee is our youngest, he has Down Syndrome. He 
bags groceries at Broulim's and attends Adventure Center. He is a huge help to me around the 
house. 

Bruce married Jody Andrews and their children are: Dallin, Cassidy, Cade and Kalli. 
Bruce works in the pressure washer business with us. Jody completed her schooling to be a 
dental hygienist on March 6, 2005. 

Carleen married Todd Christensen. He has been a dentist in Rigby for the past ten years, 
and they have 6 children: Josh, Troy, Ty, Jacob, Taya and Malaya. They moved to Anchorage, 
Alaska on June 6, 2005. We miss their frequent visits. 

Brad practices law in Salt Lake City, Utah. He graduated from the University of Idaho. 
He is married to Stephanie Smith from Salt Lake City. They have 4 children, Hyrum, Robert and 
Michael and Emily. Stephanie also graduated from the University of Idaho and may get to use 
her teaching certificate when the children grow up. 

Ryan practices law in Seattle, Washington where his wife Kimberly Brenner grew up. 
They both graduated from Utah State University. Ryan got his law degree at Creighton 
University in Omaha, Nebraska. They have recently purchased a home in Redmond, 
Washington where they plan to settle down with their two girls, Ellie & Kate. 

Carl and I have spent many happy years working together in the water cleaning business 
and in the church. Our activities in the church have been a major part of our lives. Carl served 
as Bishop, Bishop's Counselor, High Councilor, and Stake Executive Secretary for 15 years. He 
is presently serving as Patriarch of the Ucon Stake. I've taught and served in all the auxiliaries. 
I was Relief Society President for six years. Carl has spent many thousands of hours doing 
genealogy research and temple work. We served as temple workers on the Stake Initiatory 
Team. There is never a dull moment. 

We live in a beautiful setting in the country, surrounded by thousands of trees that Carl 
has planted. We love flowers and trees. We have a beautiful rose garden , gorgeous iris and 
many other beautiful flowers. 

I enjoy being at home and making quilts, especially for the grandchildren. I have spent 
many many hours collecting and compiling family histories for the publication, of the 
Piquet/Martin and the Weekes/Grover books. It is my hope that all our children and 
grandchildren will appreciate their heritage, that their testimonies will be strengthened as they 
learn of the sacrifices their ancestors made to be members of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. It is my testimony that the gospel is true and that Heavenly Father loves each 
one of us. 

We are very proud of our family and thankful for each one of our children, their spouses 
and our grandchildren. They are all actively serving in the Church and raising our 16 
grandchildren to love the Lord. We feel very blessed to enjoy relatively good health, 
comfortable surroundings and a happy life. 

Written by Joan Nykamp 



260 



Family Group Record- 445 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Robert Doualas MURRAY-4017 


i 
! 

! 


Bom 23 Dec 1944 


place Denver^ Denver, Colorado, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


L Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


11 Oct 1963 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


24 Feb 1967 




Buried [ Place 


SealPar 




Married 26 Dec 1969 (D) I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho. USA 


SeaISp 


26 Dec 1969 i I FALL 


Husbands father George MURRAY- 1 1 30 




MRIN: 442 , 


Husbands mother Bettv Jean RIEKER-1 129 




I 


wife Idonna Marie PIQUET-1 297 


I 


Bom 29 Jul 1945 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Chr. 2 Sep 1945 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


28Nov1953i_ 


Died I Place 


Endowed 


19 Nov 1966 ! IFALL | 




Burred {_Place 


SealPar 


BIC I 




wife's father Newell Augustus PIQUET-1 04 




MRIN: 1 




wife's mother Madonna WEEKES-2 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates i Temple 


' M I Nathan Douglas MURRAY-1143 




Bom 5 Mar 1974jfiace Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


27 Mar 19821 




Chr. 31 Mar 1974 Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 


Endowed 


8 Sep 1993 IFALL j 




Died J Place 


SealPar 


BICI 




Buried Place 








spouse Lillie Marie LAMBSON-6695 




MRIN: 448 I 




Married 26 Oct 20021 Place MTIMP 


SeaISp 


26 Oct 2002T MTIMP I 


M I John Patrick MURRAY-1142 




Bom 3 Dec 1975 | Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1983 






Chr. 4 Jan 1976 j Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 


Endowed 


5 Dec 1998 


IFALL 




Died 25Jun1997 Place Shellev, Binqham. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 12Jul1997 j Place Sutton Cemeterv, Archer, Madison Idaho 








Spouse 


Married | Place 


SeaISp 


i ! 


LE_ 


Shauna Marie MURRAY-1136 




Born 8 NOV 1976 


Place La Junta, Otero, Colorado, USA 


Baptized 


8 Nov 1984 




Chr. 5 Dec 1976 


Place La Janta, Otero, Colorado 


Endowed 


26 Jun 2004 


RENO 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICI 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Kayle Thomas O'BRIAN-6713 




MRIN: 446 


Married 27 Mav 2003 I Place Jackson Hole. Teton, Wvominq 


SeaISp 


6 Auq 2004! SLAKE ! 


F ! Laura llene MURRAY-1137 




Bom 10 Jun 1978 I Place La Junta, Otero. Colorado, USA 


Baptized 


10 Jun 1986i 




chr 2 Jul 1978 | Place La Janta, Otero, Colorado 


Endowed 


29 Sep 1999! IFALL j 




Died Place 


SealPar 


BICI 




Buried I Place 




spouse Stephen Jay BUCHANAN-6669 




MRIN 447 


. 


Married 5 Auq 2004 I Place SLAKE 


SeaISp 


5 Auq 2004 SLAKE 1 


F 


Renae Ruth MURRAY-1135 


^ 


Bom 11 Jan 1980 [Pfece Enqlewood, Araphoe, Colorado, USA 


Baptized 


11 Jan 1988 


i 




chr. 3 Feb 1980 Place Enqlewood, Araphoe, Colorado, USA 


Endowed 








Died Place 


SealPar 


BICI 




Buried i Place 




Spouse 








Married | Place 


SeaISp 


I 


jd 


Carta Anne MURRAY-1 140 


r 


Bom 12 Aug 1981 Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


12 Aug 1989 I 


chr. 6 Sep 1981 Place Idaho Falls. Bonnevulle. Idaho 


Endowed 


31 Dec 2005T SLAKE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICI 


Buried 


Place 






Spouse 






Married ] Place 


SeaISp 


: l 



261 









Family Group Record- 


445 






Page 2 of 2 


Husband Robert Douglas MURRAY-401 7 








! 




wife Idonna Marie PIQUET-1297 








! 




Children List each child in order of birth. 




LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


7 


F jLisa Madonna MURRAY-1141 








i 






Bom 26Auq1983 


piace Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


26 AugJ_991 


I 


i 


Chr. 6 Nov 1983 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 




Endowed 








Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse 








i 


8 




Married Place 




SeaISp 






M ! Michael Robert MURRAY-1 1 39 












Born 4 Dec 1986 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


4 Dec 1994 


I 




Chr. 4 Jan 1987 


Place Shelley, Bingham. Idaho 


Endowed 


31 Dec 2005 I SLAKE I 




Died 


Place 


SealPat 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 








I 


1 
i 


Spouse 






Married | Place 




SeaISp 




I 



262 4 Mar 2006 




Bob & 1 donna Murray 

Family 
Top back: John. Renae, 
Lisa, Carla. Laura 
Front: Bob, Idonna, 
Mike, Shauna. Nathan 




Murray Children 
Below Back: Carla, 
Renae, Shauna, Lisa, 
Front: Mike, Laura, 
Nathan. Middle photo 
Idonna Piquet Murray 




263 



ROBERT AND IDONNA PIQUET MURRAY FAMILY 

Bob and I met while serving in the Great Lakes Mission. We renewed our acquaintance at 
BYU. I was working as the Dissertation Secretary and he was going to school. We were married 
in the Idaho Falls Temple on Dec. 26, 1969. 

Our first year and a half was spent at BYU while Bob was finishing his degree. From 
there we went to Loma Linda University in California where Bob earned a degree in Medical 
Record Administration. 

His first job was in Idaho Falls. While living there, Nathan and John were born. We then 
moved to LaJunta, Colorado where Bob worked as Medical Record Administrator. We lived in a 
small branch. Bob served as the Branch President and I served as the Primary President and also 
taught one of the Relief Society Lessons. 

By the time we left LaJunta in 1979, Shauna and Laura had joined our family. Having the 
little ones around added a new dimension to our lives. It was so great. 

Bob's father owned a wrecking yard in Littleton, Co., and Bob wanted to move there to 
see if he could go into business with his dad. We bought a house and after a year and a half, 
decided that it probably would never happen. 

We decided to move back to Idaho to be around my family, so even though there were no 
jobs available in Bob's field, we moved back in 1980. Bob went to EVITS for a year, and got a 
job at the INEL. He worked there for ten years, until his dad died in Denver, leaving a big clean- 
up project to be done. 

Two years later, he was still working at it, dividing his time between Denver and home. 
During the summer, he always had a couple of kids go and help with the project. They enjoyed 
going and he enjoyed having some extra help. 

By 1984 we had decided to purchase an 84 acre farm in the Woodville area, west of 
Shelley. We felt that a farm would be a great place to raise a family, so they could learn to work. 

There were opportunities for all of us to learn responsibility as well as plenty of work to 
go around. There was pipe moving, planting and harvesting crops, and a much neglected farm to 
be cleaned up. We raised 45 calves on five nurse cows every year. We remodeled the old farm 
house and eventually built a new home. The kids learned many construction skills as they helped 
build our home. 

Nathan, our oldest, graduated in 1992, attended Ricks College a year before his mission 
in Scotland. Nathan always had a talent for business. He started with cattle when he was ten, 
later selling potatoes and fresh produce. In 1999 he founded "Nutty Guy's", selling nuts, dried 
fruit and candy. Nathan married Lillie Lambson on Oct. 26. 2002. On Feb. 3, 2005 they gave 
birth to Ty Jarum. 

John, our second son had a real struggle with mental illness. He was very talented in so 
many ways, and had a very caring disposition. In 1997 when the Snake River flooded, he 
drowned. 

Shauna graduated from Shelley High School in 1995. Her schooling, both high school 
and college was interlaced with lots of basketball. She graduated from the University of Hawaii 
in December 2002. Her plans to become a physical therapist were abated when she met Kayle 
O'Brien in Jackson Hole Wyoming. They were married in May of 2003. They bought a home in 
Sparks, Nevada and are expecting a baby boy in May. 

Laura graduated from Ricks College and BYU. She interrupted her college to serve a 
mission in Uruguay. During her first semester at the University of Utah in pursuit of a Masters 



264 



in Occupational Therapy she met Steve Buchanan, who was working on his Physical Therapy 
degree. They were married on August 5, 2004. Laura works at the Moran Eye Center and Steve 
at Primary Children's Hospital. 

Renae earned her Cosmetology license while finishing high school in Littleton, Colorado 
in 1998. After working in Colorado for a couple of years, she moved to Jackson Hole, Wyoming 
in 2000. She loves the beauty and endless opportunities for recreation. Her hard work enabled 
her to buy a home there, and in October 2004, she opened her own beauty salon, "The Hair 
Place". 

Carla is a 1999 Shelley High School graduate. Carla graduated from BYU-I in 2004, 
completing a degree in Recreational Education Therapy. Through the years, Carla had the 
opportunity to spend most of a year in Moscow, Russia in the International Language Program. 
Carla worked in Alaska a couple of summers. She just passed the Utah Real Estate exam and 
has accepted a job in Huntsville, Utah. 

Lisa has been a real sports enthusiast, it seems like no matter what sport she plays, she 
just naturally does well. She is a hard worker and has a great talent working with her hands. She 
graduated from Westview High School in Idaho Falls. She currently works at Sure Glow Car 
Wash. Every other weekend, she travels up to Jackson Hole to use her cleaning talents to help 
pay her bills. 

Mike graduated from Heritage High School in Littleton, Colorado in December 2004. 
Within a couple of weeks, he had started school at BYU Hawaii. Through the years he has 
played many different sports in high school, as well as used his talents in piano, voice and violin. 
Work on the annual staff added a little change of pace to his schooling and work. 

Em in the empty-nest phase of my life. To keep the bills paid, I care for two women as 
an Adult Foster Care Provider. It has been good for me, because I love being at home, so I can 
garden, do yard work and all the other things that I enjoy. For eight years now, I have been on 
my own since Bob filed for divorce in 1997. Life goes on and I feel that as I serve in the church 
and support the kids in their busy lives that I am truly blessed. It is a thrill for me to be a 
grandmother and have these special little spirits coming into our family. 

Written by Idonna Murray 2005 



265 



Family Group Record- 4 



Page 1 of 2 





Husband 


Gordon Jay ALLEN-1 138 










Bom 


14 Apr 1955 | Place Provo, Utah, Utah, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


5 Jun 1955 j Place Provo, Utah, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


11 May 1963 




I 

I 


Died 


Place 


Endowed 


7 Jun 1974 


SGEOR 




Buried 


I Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Married 


20 Dec 1976 Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


20 Dec 1976 


SLAKE 




Husband's father John Butler ALLEN- 11 27 






MRIN: 440 






Husband's mother Gloria GARDNER-1 131 










Wife 


Cherrie Kathleen PIQUET-4 












Bom 


29 Jul 1946 


place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


29 Sep 1946 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


28 Sep 1954 




! 


Died 




Place 


Endowed 


18 Dec 1976 


SLAKE 




Buried 


j Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's father Newell Auqustus PIQUET-1 04 






MRIN: 1 


1 




wife-smother Madonna WEEKES-2 








Chi 


dren 


List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M 


Robert Jay ALLEN-4490 










Bom 


18 Aug 1971 Place Fort HooglBell, Texas, USA 


Baptized 


21 Jun 1981 




j 


Chr. 


21 Jun 1981 


Place Labelle, Riqby Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 


i 


Died 




Place 


SealPar 


27 Nov 1981 


IFALL 


i 


Buried 


j Place 










Spouse 










2 




Married 


! Place 


SeaISp 






F 


Anna Kathleen ALLEN-1 152 










Bom 


9 Nov 1973 


Place Las Veqas, Clark, Nevada, USA 


Baptized 


5 Dec 1981 




I 


Chr. 


21 Jun 1981 


Place Labelle, Riqbv Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 




j 


Died 




Place 


SealPar 


27 Nov 1981 


IFALL 




Buried 


Place 








i 


Spouse 


Roqer Charles EARL-6844 






MRIN 455 


3 




Married 


16 Jan 1999 l Place Salt Lake Citv, Utah, Utah 


SeaISp 




1 


M 


Donald Gordon ALLEN-441 1 




Bom 


31 May 1975 I Place Las Veqas, Clark, Nevada, USA 


Baptized 


4 Jun 1983 






Chr. 


21 Jun 1981 Place Labelle. Riqbv Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 






I 


Died 


i Place 


SealPar 


27 Nov 1981 


IFALL 


l 


Buried 


j Place 








; I 


Spouse 










4 




Married 


I Place 


SeaISp 






M 


Keith Clinton ALLEN-1 303 










Bom 


28 Nov 1982 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


1 Dec 1990 




i 


Chr. 


3 Jan 1983 j Place Labelle, Riqbv Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 


1 Dec 2001 


IFALL 






Died 


| Place 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 


j Place 










Spouse 


TaNelle Rae KING-6846 






MRIN: 542 




Married 


18 Jun 2005 i Place Turlock, Stanislaus. California 


SeaISp 


15 Jul 2006 


IFALL i 


5 


F 


CheraLeeALLEN-4019 




Bom 


29 Dec 1983 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


4 Jan 1992 


i 


i 


Chr 


5 Feb 1984 


Place Labelle, Riqby Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 




I 


I 


Died 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


! 


I 


Buried 


Place 










Spouse 


6 




Married 


| Place 


SeaISp 




| 


F 


Codv Lynn ALLEN-1 146 






I 




Bom 


26 Jun 1987 Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


8 Jul 1995 1 




Chr. 


2 Auq 1987 Place Labelle, Riqby Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 


17 Dec 2005 


IFALL n 


I 


Died 


i Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


j Place 










Spouse 


Derek Jon OSWALD-6847 






MRIN: 451 


7 




Married 


20 Dec 2005 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville. Idaho 


SeaISp 


20 Dec 2005 


IFALL ! 


M 


Clansy Jay ALLEN-4476 






i 
1 




Bom 


3 Auq 1990 


Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


5 Sep 1998 


1 




Chr. 


2 Sep 1990 


Place Labelle, Riqbv Jefferson Idaho 


Endowed 


1 
1 


i 


Died 
Buried 




Place 


SealPar 


BIC n 


1 


j 




Place 


i 


JSpouse 














Married 


! Place 


SeaISp 




1 



266 10 Mar 2006 




Gordon & Cherrie Piquet Allen Family 

Back: Chera, Gordon, Clint, Anna & Roger Earl 

Front: Bobbie, Cody, Clansy, Cherrie, Donny, Chalayna 




Clansy, Clint, Chera, Cherrie, Gordon & Cody Allen 



267 



CHERRIE PIQUET AND GORDON ALLEN FAMILY 

Gordon and Cherrie met at BYU in 1976 and were married in December of that 
same year. We bought a small home in Orem, Utah and lived there for a year and a half. 
Gordon did building and Cherrie taught first grade. 

At that time, we thought we would live in Orem, Utah forever. Aunt Opal and 
Uncle Keith Clements called us one night and asked if we would stay in their house while 
they went on a mission to Minnesota. Cherrie felt bad, but said, we just can't do that 
because of jobs and we had bought a home. We felt settled. About three days later, 
Cherrie was at a stake meeting and they called again. This time they talked to Gordon 
and he said yes. He went up to work with Roger before he died. He was there and at the 
end of the school year, we moved to Idaho (1978). Cherrie got a job in Rigby teaching 
first grade again. 

We stayed in Uncle Keith and Aunt Opal's house while they went on their 
mission. In the meantime, we bought our own home in LaBelle and rented it out. When 
those people moved out, we moved into our own home. We were in the process of 
adopting and needed the bathrooms and space to qualify. 

Shortly after we moved to Rigby, (May 1 980) our adoption went through and we 
got three kids all at once, Bob, Anna, and Don. We spent four days in Las Vegas, 
Nevada, picking them up. This changed our lives totally. Our freedom was gone. It was 
a difficult time but we learned a lot. Months later, we had a miracle and found out that 
we were going to have a baby. We had been assured many times that this would never 
happen. 

Clint was born in 1982, Chera in 1983, Cody in 1987 and Clansy in 1990. They 
were all miracles. Gordon worked at the Grand Teton Mall for about 10 years, and then 
moved to his current job for the City of Idaho Falls. 

In 1987, just after Cody was born, Uncle Keith and Aunt Opal traded a pasture in 
the Teton Basin for another they had. This one had an old home on it and we spent much 
of our life up there on weekends and whenever. 

Our lives have been full of surgeries, cancer scares, and other worries. However, 
we have been very blessed and have much to be grateful for. Heavenly Father has given 
us many miracles. 

In 2001, because of an encroaching housing division, we decided to subdivide our 
property and move to our farm across the street. We have been so happy on our 30 acres. 
The kids had plenty of places to play and we have enjoyed the privacy. We entertain a 
lot of BYU-I students and they have come to love the wide open spaces. 

Anna was married to Roger Earl. They live with their daughter, Shalayna in 
Tooele, Utah. Anna and Roger both drive truck and do well. Bob and Don live in group 
homes in St. Anthony. Don works for Upper Valley and Bob works for the Relay Station 
north of St. Anthony. They enjoy their work and have done well considering the mental 
challenges they have. 

Clint was called on a mission to Argentina. He left December 19, 2000. It was 
difficult because we had just sold our home and had no place to live. Carleen and Todd 
Christensen were kind enough to invite us in. We lived there about a month and even had 
our missionary farewell dinner there. We grew attached enough, we could have just 
stayed. They were so kind to us. 



268 



In the meantime, Clint returned from his mission with the ability to speak great 
Spanish. Clint, Chera, and Cody are all attending BYU-I. Chera will graduate with her 
Elementary Teaching Certificate in the Spring of 2006. While attending BYU-1, Clint 
met and married ToNell Rae King on June 18, 2005, in Turlock, Stanislaus, California. 
Cody met Derek Oswald at BYU-I. They were married December 20, 2005 in the Idaho 
Falls Temple. Chera and Cody are following in their mother's footsteps in their teaching 
careers. Clint is majoring in Business Management. 

Clansy and Clint both received their Eagle Scout awards when they were 14 and 
Clansy is just beginning driver's ed. It is fun to see them all develop, but hard to let them 
go on in life. 

In 2001, we made a decision to sell the ranch at the Basin. We traded it for a 
storage business in Rexburg. This has been a great learning experience and we feel a 
wise choice. We feel grateful to Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith for this blessing. 

Gordon and I love to go to the temple. Gordon enjoys his horses and 4 wheelers. 
Actually, anything in the out of doors suits him well. Cherrie has taught school for 34 
years and still enjoys working with the students. We are thankful to be well and alive and 
hope for some good years to come to enjoy lots of grandkids and go on missions. 

Written by Cherrie Allen 




Gordon & Cherrie Allen Family 
Back: Clint Allen, Roger & Anna Earl, Cody & Derek Oswald,Clansy 
Front: TaNelle King Allen. Cherrie, Gordon Chera, Allen 



269 









Family Group Record 




Pagel of 1 


Husband David Bruce Bryan 






Bom 31 Dec 1950 


place Richland, Benton, Washinqton, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 






Chr 7 Feb 1951 


Pface Richland, Benton, Washington, USA 


Baptized 25 Apr 1959 




Died 


Pface 


Endowed 29 Jan 1970 1 SLAKE i 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar BIC 








Married 27 Apr 1973 


Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


seaisp 27 Apr 1973 


SLAKE 




Husband's father Bruce Alton Bryan 






I Husband's mother Shirley Jewkes 




wife Nola Jean Piquet 






Bom 29 Oct 1947 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




cur. 7 Dec 1947 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 4 Feb 1956 j 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 19 May 1970 


FALL 




Buried Race 


SealPar BIC 






wife's father Newell Augustus Piquet 






vwes mother Madonna Weekes 


I 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


M 


Edward P Bryan 






Bom 10 Oct 1979 


pface Salt Lake City, Salt Lake. Utah 


Baptized 30 Oct 1987 


I 




Chr. 19 Apr 1980 


Pface West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah 


Endowed 1 Jul 1999 


BOISE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 19 Apr 1980 


SLAKE 




Buried 


Pface 


I 






spouse Denise Nancy Bumham 




Married 6 Jun 2003 ! Pface Loaan. Cache, Utah 


seaisp 6 Jun 2003 I LOGAN 


2 


F 


Marie Bryan 






Bom 29 Sep 1981 


Pface La Paz, La Paz, Bolivia 


Baptized 7 Oct 1989 








chr. 1 Aug 1982 


Place West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah 


Endowed 14Dec2002 


BOISE 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 31 Jul 1982 I JRIVE j 




Buried 


Place 


! 




spouse Jesse William Mortensen II 






Married 16 Oct 2004 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


seatsp 16 Oct 2004 I SLAKE I 


3 


F 


Carolyn Bryan 






Bom 30 Oct 1984 


pface Provo, Utah, Utah 


Baptized 31 Oct 1992 






Chr 6 Dec 1987 


pface West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah 


Endowed 






Died 


Pface 


SealPar 5 Dec 1987 


JRIVE 




Buried 


Pface 




Spouse 




Married I Place 


SeaISp 



Prepared by 
Phone 



David Bryan 
208-362-3 772 



E-mail address 



Address 



J5765 Diamond 
_Boj§eJD 83709. 



270 



Date prepared 3 Jan 2 006 



NOLA PIQUET AND DAVID BRYAN FAMILY 

Our family began on the 27 th of April, 1973 in the Salt Lake Temple as we were married 
and sealed for time and eternity. We had met while we were serving missions in the New 
Zealand South Mission in 1970-71. We did not know it then but our paths were to cross later and 
we found a lasting relationship. 

Dave was born 31 December, 1950 in Richland, Washington to Shirley Jewkes and 
Bruce Alton Bryan. He was the second child of two girls and three boys. They were raised in 
Murray, Utah. I, Nola Jean Piquet, was born 29 October, 1947 in Archer, Idaho to Madonna 
Weekes and Newell Augustus Piquet. I was the fifth girl in a family of eight girls and three boys. 
I was raised on a farm in the Ucon area near Idaho Falls. 

We lived in Salt Lake City for two and a half years before we purchased a home in West 
Jordan, Utah where we lived for sixteen years. Our family grew there with three children, Ed 
(born 10 October, 1979), Marie (born 29 September, 1981) and Carolyn (born 30 October, 
1984). Dave worked for most of our years in Utah for Zee Medical. He served in the Ward there 
in many capacities and then was called to be the Bishop. I enjoyed serving in the Primary 
organization in several different callings including president of the Ward and Stake Primary. It 
was fun to work with my own children. 

We felt a desire to change working conditions and the opportunity came to move to 
Boise in June of 1989. We bought a home here and had a little more of the farm atmosphere. Our 
family raised our own beef, rabbits, chickens, dogs and cats. It was a great thing to have the 
animals and work to do but also plenty of room to run and play. Shortly after arriving here in 
Boise, I was called as the Relief Society President and was able to get acquainted pretty quickly! 
Dave has served in the High Council and in the Ward and we are currently the Ward Mission 
Leader and companion. Our desire is to be able to serve full time missions together in the next 
few years. 

Ed loved sports and hunting. He played soccer and baseball until he was 13 and then 
began his favorite sport - football. He did well in football but he also did well playing the 
trumpet in elementary and junior high. He was an excellent writer and loved reading. He 
received his Eagle Scout award when he was 13 years old and was a natural in the outdoors. Ed 
has a lot of motivation and seems to know what he wants most of the time and how to get it. He 
reads voraciously, especially history, and keeps himself informed on most important things. He 
chose to go on a mission and was called to the California Anaheim, Spanish Speaking Mission. 
He still speaks Spanish fluently. He met and married a wonderful girl from our Ward, Denise 
Nancy Burnham, on 6 June, 2003. They purchased a home in Kuna, Idaho and are expecting 
their first baby, a boy, on 25 June, 2005. Ed has worked for a phone center in the Boise Town 
Square Mall since he returned from his mission. We were blessed with the opportunity to buy 
that store as partners in August, 2004 and it has been a great blessing to us. Ed knows the 
business inside and out and is able to run it well with little help from Dad. 

Marie has enjoyed music and writing and people, especially children. She played the 
trumpet also in elementary and junior high school. She has a good eye for decorating, designing 
and color. After high school she worked at Pier 1 Imports for a year and enjoyed what she 
learned from the interior decorators there. She then sold Tupperware for a year and built up a 
nice supply of that. She loves working with children and in now teaching a small preschool 
group. She felt for a long time that she wanted to serve a mission and was ready to leave by the 
time she was twenty one. She served in the South Dakota, Rapid City Mission. After returning 
home, she was engaged and was married to Jesse William Mortensen on 16 October, 2004. As 



271 



they traveled to their reception in Sheridan, Wyoming the following week, they were in an 
accident and totaled their car. She was thrown thirty feet and is very blessed to be alive. Jesse 
injured the side of his head and his shoulder. They are living in Meridian, Idaho and working as 
they recuperate. 

Carolyn was our little helper, an animal lover and an independent girl. She knew the 
name and home of every dog and cat in the neighborhood and they knew her. Neighbors would 
call and tell us they had a dog at their home that they hadn't seen before and wondered if Carolyn 
could come tell them who it belonged to. And she did! She loved the cows, the chickens, the 
birds in the yard and any other living thing. Her heart was open to almost everyone too. She also 
loved music and took up playing the flute when she was in elementary school. She had an 
accident in which three of her fingers were cut pretty badly so she was never able to get back 
into the high school band although she does play in church and for her own pleasure. She took up 
the potter's wheel instead and has become quite proficient at making pottery as well as ceramics. 
Carolyn was able to purchase for a minimal amount 3000 ceramic molds and has learned to do a 
large variety of things with them. She is now at BYU Idaho majoring in the Ceramic Arts. She 
worked for Wal-Mart for one year before going to Rexburg and did a great job there. She is full 
of fun and brings a lot of love into our lives. 




The Dave and Nola Bryan Family 
Back, L-R - Marie & Jesse Mortensen, Ed and Carolyn Bryan. 
Front: Nola, Denise holding Trae, and Dave Bryan. 



272 









Family Group Record- 7 






Page 1 of 1 


Husband Roger Newel 


PIQUET-6 




Bom 24 Dec 1948 


Place REXBERG. Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


cur 6 Mar 1949 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


23 Feb 1 957 j 




Died 27 May 1978 I P'ace Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


29 Dec 1967 j IFALL 




Buned 30 May 1978 Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




Married 22 Jun 1973 I Place St. Georqe, Washinaton, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


22 Jun 1973 I SGEOR i 


Husbands father Newell Augustus PIQUET-104 




MRIN: 1 






Husbands mother Madonna WEEKES-2 






wife Analee SPENCER-1 151 




I 




Bom 1 Mar 1953 


Place Panquitch, Garfield, Utah, USA 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 






Chr 7 Jun 1953 


Place Escalante, Garfield, Utah. USA 


Baptized 


15 Apr 1961 ! 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


22 Jun 1973! SGEOR 






Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC I 




other spouse Kent Clair ROBINSON-4584 




MRIN: 453 




Married 6 Jun 1981 (D) | Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SeaISp 


I 
i 






other spouse Reid Calvin KNUDSEN-4585 




MRIN: 454 






Married 21 Dec 1996 I Place Pleasant Grove. Utah, Utah 


SeaISp 


I 




wifes father Vernon Rufus SPENCER-1 1 32 




MRIN: 50 


1 




wHe-s mother Rula Jane WELLS-1 00 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


F | Shaeleen PIQUET-3963 








Bom 31 May 1974 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


5 Jun 1982! LIVE 






chr 7 Jul 1974 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 






Died | Place 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried | Place 








spouse Shon Lynn LEAVITT-7089 




MRIN: 2056 




Married 30 Apr 1994 ! Place Oaden, Weber. Utah 


SeaISp 


I 


2 


F i Brenda Jo PIQUET-4473 






Bom 6 Feb 1976 j Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Mar 1984 1 LIVE 




chr. 6 Apr 1976 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 








Died Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried i Place 




Spouse 




Married | Place 


SeaISp 


i 


3 


F 


SherilynPIQUET-1150 






Bom 23 Jun 1978 i Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1 986 I LIVE 




Chr. 2 Jul 1978 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


Endowed 


Feb 1998 | SGEOR 




Died 20 Feb 1995 


Place Escalante.'Garfield, Utah, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 27 Feb 1995 


Place Escalante, Garfield. Utah. USA 




Spouse 




Married { Place 


SeaISp 


I 


4 


M 


Andrew Vernon ROB 


UNSON-4772 






Bom 29 May 1985 


Place Panguitch, Garfield, Utah 


Baptized 


14 Sep 1993 






Chr. 14 Jul 1985 


Place Escalante, Garfield, Utah 


Endowed 


10 Jan 2003 


OGDEN 




Died 13 Oct 2002 


Place Elko, Elko, Nevada 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 18 Oct 2002 


Place Escalante Cemetery Escalante, Garfield, Utah 








Spouse 






Married ] Place 


SeaISp 


i I 



24 Feb 2006 



273 





Top left - Roger and Artalee Piquet. 
Top right -L-R- Sherilyn, Analee; 

Shaeleen, Brenda Piquet in front. 
Bottom left-Analee and Re id Knudsen. 
Right - Andy Robinson, Analee's son. 




274 




Top left ; Analee Spencer and Roger Newell Piquet 

Top right: Roger and Analee Piquet and girls, left- Brenda & Shaeleen. 




Jaymen Irvin, Shaeleen Piquet, Brenda Piquet, Kyler Leavitt. Right: Sherilyn Piquet 



275 



ROGER NEWELL & ANALEE SPENCER PIQUET FAMILY 

Roger Newell Piquet came into this world on December 24, 1948. After five girls he was 
a most welcome addition. He was a small baby, but that lasted for only a short time. Before 
long he became his Dad's shadow and the word tractor was one of the first words he learned. By 
the time he was ten years old he was as competent on a tractor as a man. 

His parents, Newell and Madonna Weekes Piquet, had three more girls after he was born 
and then two boys on the tail end. Roger was much needed on the farm and did more than his 
share. Tractors, machinery and heavy equipment have always been of great interest to him. 

Roger's motto seemed to be "If we're going to do it, let's get it done!" There was always 
work to be done and he saw to it that all that could possibly be done, was done! He urged those 
around him to greater efficiency and used whatever resources were available to him to repair or 
create just what was needed for the job at hand. He had no time for idleness - he always needed 
to be doing something. It didn't matter to Roger if he was working for himself, his Dad, the 
Welfare Farm, or others, his work was always done quickly and thoroughly. 

Roger loved sports. Every chance he got he played basketball. That was his favorite and 
he was good at it. He loved the competition - he would stand anyone. He loved the teamwork 
and was always a good sport and a gentleman. 

Roger attended Ricks College after high school and then served a mission in the Great 
Lakes Mission. He loved his mission and never quit being a missionary. When he returned, he 
attended BYU. He became the family father for a family home evening group there and met his 
wife to be, Analee Spencer. They dated while he was working on a degree in Business 
Administration. 

Analee Spencer grew up in Escalante, Utah, a little out of the way place that she and her 
family loved. Her parents were Rufus Vernon and Rula Jane Wells Spencer. Analee and her one 
sister, Camille, were very close to each other and their parents. She is one of those people who is 
a magnet to all around her. She loves people and they love her. She was one of the greatest 
things that happened in Roger's life and his family took her in and love her as one of the sisters. 

Following graduation, Roger and Analee were married in the St. George Temple, 22 
June, 1973. They had five short years of marriage and the love they share has radiated out to 
touch the lives of many family and friends. Roger was severely injured in a freak motorcycle 
accident on May 22, 1978. He lived with the help of machines for almost five days. Roger 
passed away on Saturday, May 27, 1978. He left two little girls and Analee eight months 
pregnant with a third daughter. They are the parents of Shaeleen, born 3 1 May, 1 974, Brenda, 
born 6 Feb., 1976, and Sherilyn, born 23 June, 1978. The two older girls knew and loved their 
Daddy. He would scoop one of them up in each arm and proudly carry them wherever he was 
going. It was not uncommon to find him babysitting when Analee had a Church meeting. He 
loved to lay on the floor with them and eat popcorn and ice cream and read to them or just watch 
TV. He stood tallest in his role as a husband and father. 

Analee had one more child, a son named Andy, born 29 May, 1985, after her father 
(Vernon) and grandfather, Andrew Spencer. She is married to a fine man, Reid Knudsen. Reid 
and his children have brought much joy into Analee's life and that of her family. They live in 
Mayfield, Utah where Analee works in the South Sanpete School District office in coordinating 
the school lunch program. She also is currently the president elect of the State Food Services 
Association. She travels a great deal and has the opportunity to visit her children as she travels. 



276 



Shaeleen is a nurse and lives in Utah with her two boys, Jaymen (7 yrs.) and Kyler (5 
yrs.)- She is working at the Legacy Health Care in Ogden and enjoys being able to take care of 
people. She loves her boys and her home and has started having fun reunions there for her 
Piquet cousins! 

Brenda has been going to school for several years and it has paid off as she will receive 
her Doctorate in Psychology from Alliant International College in Irvine, California! She will 
graduate in May of 2006 and then has at least another year of graduate work before she'll be on 
her own. 

Sherilyn grew up to be a beautiful young woman of 16 years and through a freak accident 
was shot and killed. Sherilyn was loved by everyone. The Escalante newspaper said of her 
funeral, it was "One of the largest ever experienced in the county..." She died February 20, 
1995 leaving a heartbroken mother and family. 

Andy became a sportsman - football especially. He played football at Escalante High 
School and loved it. He was a happy young man and had many friends that came into their home 
daily. Andy was a friendly guy to everyone. Then, on October 13, 2002, he had a fatal car 
accident and again left a grieving family. 

Analee and Reid have combined their families and enjoy all of them. They work hard 
and have their time filled with many jobs and goals, the latest being an interest in building a 
tourist attraction in their town. They have purchased old wagons and a sleigh and they take 
people for rides - summer or winter, with their horses pulling them. Reid loves animals and has 
a variety on their little "farm". 



277 



Family Group Record- 1718 













Page 1 of 1 


Huste 




I 




Bom 20 Feb 1946 Place LOGAN, Cache. Utah, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 14 Apr 1946 ! Place LOGAN, Cache, Utah. USA 


Baptized 


6 Mar 1954 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


9 Oct 1965 


L&/\ti* 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


' 




Married 15 Dec 1972 


Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


15 Dec 1972 


SLAKE 




Husband's father Hervin Bemell NIELSEN-5653 




MRIN: 1880 




Husbands mother Francis La Rue CLARKE-541 3 






Wife 




Bom 9 Apr 1951 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 3Jun1951 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 May 1959 




r 5ied 


Place 


Endowed 


9 Dec 1972 


SLAKE 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


wife's father Newell Augustus PIQUET-5046 




MRIN: 224 ! 


wife's mother Madonna WEEKES-745 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates | Temple 


M I Robert Clarke NIELSEN-9490 




1 
1 




Bom 30Jun1981 


Place Thousand Oaks, Ventura, California, USA 


Baptized 


5Auq 1989 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9 Auq 2000 


BOISE | 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


Buried 


Place 






Spouse Katie GREEN- 13827 




MRIN: 6033 


Married 30 Jul 2005 I Place Loaan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


30 Jul 2005 I LOGAN 


F 


Sharilyn NIELSEN-9489 




Bom 28 Feb 1986 


Place Camarillo, Ventura, California, USA 


Baptized 


5 Mar 1994 


I 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


• — i 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 








Spouse 


Married J Place 


SeaISp 





278 






Top left - Clarke and Marilyn 
Nielsen Family. Marilyn, Clarke, 
Robbie and baby Sherilyn. 

Top right - middle back clockwise - 
Clarke, Marilyn, Sharilyn, Robbie. 

Left - back - Sharilyn, Robbie, and 
Clarke and Marilyn in front 



279 



MARILYN PIQUET AND CLARKE NIELSEN FAMILY 

Marilyn Piquet was born on a April 9, 1951 in Rexburg, Idaho. She was the seventh 
child of eleven born to Newell and Madonna while they lived in Archer. A year later they moved 
to Ucon, to a larger farm where she grew up, graduating from Bonneville High School in Idaho 
Falls in 1969. 

The farm was a great teacher of learning to work and enjoying it. She loved all of her 
cats, playing kick the can and sardines at night after the work was over, and the trips to 
California in a school bus to pick up baby calves. Driving back home through downtown Las 
Vegas with the bus windows down she enjoyed watching the fancy people in their convertibles 
gasp in amazement. Flooding the lawn and playing in the water was another fun pastime. Water, 
dirt and growing things became a part of growing up. 

After high school she attended BYU and graduated in elementary education. During 
summers she worked in Jackson Hole as a dude ranch cook, a farmhand in Provo, and at the 
BYU Police station as a dispatcher. 

In the Spring of 1972, during Marilyn's third year at BYU in Provo, she met Clarke 
Nielsen from Camarillo, California. He was raised in Downey and Pocatello, Idaho then moved 
to California when he was fifteen. After he graduated from BYU in August, they were engaged 
to be married. That fall Marilyn did her student teaching in Idaho Falls. Clarke hauled hay and 
worked for The Bud Harris Construction Co. remodeling the Idaho Falls Temple. When an 
opening came up with the Union Pacific Railroad in Pocatello as a switchman/brakeman he 
worked there until he and Marilyn were married December 15 in the Salt Lake Temple. (No 
"Temple-By-The-River" marriage because it was still closed for remodeling). A warm and 
wonderful honeymoon was enjoyed in Southern California, thawing out from the 15 degree 
below zero temperature on their wedding day. 

Then it was back to Provo for Marilyn's last semester. Clarke worked as the physical 
education instructor at a handicapped school in Provo. One of his responsibilities was to organize 
the Regional Special Olympics held in Cougar Stadium in May. Marilyn finished her degree and 
graduated. They moved to Clarke's hometown, Camarillo in June 1973. Marilyn taught 
kindergarten and first grade at Mesa Union School for five years. She loved teaching children 
how to read and help them develop a great self-image. Clarke worked in soils engineering for 
eleven years. He loves about any kind of sports, especially basketball. He went back to BYU- 
Hawaii after his Hawaiian mission to play basketball there for three years. Clarke's parents were 
living in Camarillo and were wonderful in-laws. We spend a lot of time with them, going out to 
dinner and playing Rook or Mah Jung. They were very supportive parents in all our different 
activities we had going on with house building, developments, school teaching, etc. Robby was 
a welcome and long awaited blessing in June 1981 and Sharilyn in February of 1986. 

In 1985 Clarke and Marilyn started their own business, a land development company, 
where they developed twenty acres on the top of a mountain into twelve one acre view lots. The 
view was overlooking Pleasant Valley, the Pacific Ocean and the Channel Islands. Their 
development became the Highland Hills Estates and is one of the most beautiful in the Camarillo 
valley. 

Clarke and Marilyn built and sold custom homes on several of the developed lots. Just 
before the development was completed they were introduced to a business opportunity with 
Reliv International, a network marketing nutrition company. This enabled them to build a large 
business and move their base of operation to Boise in 1993 and live in Eagle to raise their family. 



280 



Robby spent the summers on the farm in Ucon helping Grandpa Piquet, who passed on 
the family tradition of hard work. He taught him mechanic skills, truck and tractor driving, and a 
real love of farming. Rob always had a real soft spot in his heart for Grandpa and Grandma. 

Robby has many hobbies and interests. Before one of the Reliv Company cruises he and 
his father certified in scuba diving and enjoyed a beautiful dive trip in the Bahamas. Rob 
developed a great love of fishing from the time he was 3. He was fishing with Uncle Keith and 
Aunt Opal (Clements) and when he wasn't looking Aunt Opal tied a dead fish onto the end of his 
line and put it back in the stream. After getting his attention she exclaimed, "Robby, look !, 
you've got a fish." It was the beginning of a lifelong love that he has shared with his father and 
grandfathers. Rob has always enjoyed 4-wheeling, camping, building fires, and enjoys playing in 
the water and dirt as much as his mom does. When he was 15 he received his Eagle Scouting 
award for taking down several miles of wire fencing on a wildlife preserve in Cascade, Idaho. He 
served an LDS mission in Jacksonville, Florida. He enjoyed the Southern food, the hospitality 
and good people of the South, but definitely likes mountains and cold weather with lots of snow. 
After he returned from his mission he went to BYU-Idaho, worked for Uncle Vern Piquet as a 
semi-truck driver and then attended BSU in Boise to get his degree in Construction Management. 
In August of 2004, Robbie met the love of his life, Katie Green from Odgen, Utah. They were 
married July 30, 2005 in the Logan Temple. 

Sharilyn was seven when her family moved to Idaho. She loved cats and always had one 
or two dressed up and in her baby buggy. She became an accomplished pianist, played high 
school volleyball, loves out door activities, and is good at about any sport especially ping pong, 
just like her dad. She was a great leader in her young women years serving as camp director for 
50 girls and as Laurel president. She graduated from high school one year early to attend BYU- 
Idaho. After two years there she was accepted at BYU Hawaii in the Fall of 2005. 








Robert and Katie Green Nielsen 



281 



Family Group Record- 758 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband DEAN HIPWELL-2530 




Bom 18 Mar 1953 Place Oqden, Weber, Utah 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 3 May 1953 


Place 


Baptized 1 Apr 1961 






Died 


Place 


Endowed 25 May 1973 


OGDEN 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 






Married 25Mav1973 


Place Oaden. Weber, Utah 


seaisp 25 Mav 1973 


OGDEN 




Husband's father Willis Ray HIPWELL-1 1632 


MRIN: 4356 


i 


Husband-s mother Frances Grace DRAAYER-1 0856 




Wife 




Bom 1 Auq 1952 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


cur. 7 Sep 1952 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 27 Auq 1960 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 25 May 1973 


OGDEN 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




other spouse Dean HIPWELL-8276 


MRIN: 3133 


Married 25 Mav 1973 I Place Oaden. Weber. Utah. USA 


seatsp 25 Mav 1973 1 OGDEN 


wrfes father Newell Auqustus PIQUET-5046 


MRIN: 224 


wife-smother Madonna WEEKES-745 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M Jason HIPWELL-254 


h 




Bom 27 Feb 1974 


Place Oqden, Weber, Utah 


Baofeed 6 Mar 1982 




Chr 4 Apr 1974 


Place lona, Bonneville Idaho 


Endowed 6 Feb 1993 


OGDEN 


Died 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse Tanya CHILD-2543 


MRIN: 764 


Married 26 Apr 1996 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah IseaiSp 26 Apr 1996 1 SLAKE 


M 


Jamie HIPWELL-254 


2 




Bom 7 Feb 1975 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 


Baptized 5 Mar 1983 




Chr. 30 Mar 1975 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 


Endowed 26 Feb 1994 


OGDENT 


Died 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




Buried 


Place 




spouse MandeeDIXON-12409 


MRIN. 4357 


Married 31 Jul 1998 ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


Seaisp 31 Jul 1998 i SLAKE 


F 


Jodi HIPWELL-2531 




Bom 2 Jan 1977 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 


Baptized 5 Jan 1985 




Chr 30 Jan 1977 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonnevulle, Idaho 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar BIC 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse Jesse BROWN-2532 


MRIN: 759 


Married 20 Oct 1995 I Place West Point, Davis, Utah 


SeaISp 



282 








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Dean & Carol Hipwell Family 

Above back: Jamie Hipwell, 
Jessie Brown, Jody Hipwell Brown, 
Carol Piquet and Dean Hipwell. 
Front: Mandy Leigh Dixon Hipwell, 
Jair Brown, Jordan Alexis Brown, 
Blake & Makayla Hipwell, Tyler 
Dean Hipwell, Tanya Child Hipwell 

Lower back: Jamie, Jody, Jason 
Front: Dean and Carol 



283 



CAROL PIQUET & DEAN HIPWELL FAMILY 

Carol Ilene Piquet graduated from Bonneville High School in 1970. She then attended 
Ricks College for 2 years where she met Dean Hipwell from Roy, Utah, in 1971. They were 
married on May 25, 1973 in the Ogden Temple. They lived in Clearfield, Utah for a year. Dean 
worked for his dad, and Carol worked for the Church Offices in Salt Lake City until their first 
son, Jason Scott Hipwell was born on February 27, 1974. 

In the spring of 1974 they moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho and Dean worked a few different 
jobs. He worked at the sugar factory; building houses, for Thiokol Corporation, and then 
for Carol's father, Newell Augustus Piquet. While working for Newell they farmed, milked cows, 
and raised pigs. Dean learned a lot about farming and mechanics from Newell. 

Their second son, Jamie Travis Hipwell was born on February 7, 1975. Jason had a great 
pal. They loved to spend time outside watching the calves, baby pigs, baby goats, and chickens. 
They loved to go down to the pasture to get the cows and bring them home with Carol. 

Their daughter, Jodi Adienne Hipwell was born on January 2, 1977. Three small children 
kept them busy. A farm is a great place to raise a family, but not a great place to earn money. 
They soon realized they were not going to own the farm someday and needed to prepare for the 
future. Dean got a job with Thiokol, West of Corinne, Utah, in December 1979. 

They moved to Garland Utah in January of 1980. Jason was in kindergarten. Carol was 
called as a Relief Society Counselor. They were really enjoying the small town of Garland. That 
fall Jason attended 1st grade; Jamie began kindergarten; and Dean was enjoying his new job at 
Thiokol with paid vacation time, insurance and benefits. Dean's mother, Frances Grace Draayer 
Hipwell passed away in January of 1980. This was a hard new experience to go through. She had 
been good to them and would be greatly missed. They found that the new house they were trying 
to buy had problems and would not pass inspection in order to qualify for the low income loan 
they had procured. It broke their hearts but they had to move in November of 1980. 

Dean's dad had a few acres in lower Roy, Utah, and said they could buy land to build on 
from him. They moved to a rental home in Roy, Utah. During their planning to build, Dean's dad 
decided he did not want the land to be used for that purpose. They found a new home to buy in 
Clearfield, Utah, and moved there in February 1981. Dean commuted from there to Thiokol. 

Jason and Jamie went to 3 schools in 4 months. They were good students and it didn't 
seem to have any bad effects on them. They soon made new friends in the new subdivision and 
enjoyed growing up in Clearfield for the next 6 years. Thiokol opened a division in Clearfield in 
1983, so Dean transferred there and ended his long commute. 

Carol started working at Basket Shack, a little shop, in 1983, and found she had a talent for, and 
enjoyed making floral arrangements for the owners, Burt and Donna Harmer. The Harmers 
wanted to retire and go on a mission so Carol and a partner, Becky Drysdale, bought the Basket 
Shack in the spring of 1987. 

Dean and Carol enjoyed gardening and growing fruit trees and after being on the farm 
they felt they needed more room. In October, 1986, they found a home on an acre in West Point, 
Utah, and moved there. They started trees and grapes and developed a large garden. In West 
Point they could have horses or cows and such. This was more to their liking. 

Jason was starting Jr. High and soon all the Hipwell kids had new friends and enjoyed the 
new area and neighborhood. Jason and Jamie enjoyed playing basketball and football. 

Jodi enjoyed working at Basket Shack and still uses her talent in that area. 

Jason served a mission to Campinas, Brazil 1993 - 1995. He attended Weber State 



284 



University until he got his masters in accounting. After his mission he dated and married Tanya 
Child, from Syracuse, Utah. They were married on April 26, 1996. They have 3 kids and one on 
the way at the time of the writing of this document. Their oldest is Makayla Hipwell. She was 
born on October 24, 1997. Their second child was a son, Blake Jason Hipwell. He was born on 
March 25, 1999. Tyler Dean Hipwell is their third child, a son. He was born on March 22, 2003. 
Jason and Tanya are expecting their fourth child, a son, in August of 2005. They moved into 
their new home in the late summer of 2004. They are busy finishing the basement to make room 
for a growing family. 

Jamie served a mission in Boston for 5 months, then was sent to Cambodia for the 
remainder of his mission. He has mission calls from 2 different prophets. He served from 1994 - 
1 996. When he returned he attended Weber State University and got his bachelors in accounting. 
He worked at a credit union and met his future wife, Mandee Leigh Dixon from West Weber, 
Utah. They were married on July 31,1998. Mandee attended Weber State University and has a 
degree in ultra sound and x-ray. Jamie works for the IRS and Mandee works at a medical clinic 
in Salt Lake City. She has had the opportunity to perform procedures on Gordon B. Hinckley and 
some other General Authorities and church leaders. They lived in Ogden in a home they 
purchased from Willis Ray Hipwell, Jamie's grandfather. In 2004 they built a large beautiful 
home in Hooper, Utah. They are expecting their first child in April of 2005. It is supposed to be a 
girl. 

Jodi married Jesse Amos Brown, from Provo, Utah, on October 20, 1995. They bought a 
home in Syracuse, Utah, in September of 2003. Jesse works as an electrician. He has worked for 
several construction companies. He is now working with his brothers doing remodel jobs. They 
have 3 children. Jair Austin Brown was born on June 7, 1995. Their second child is Jordan 
Alexis Brown, a daughter. She was born on March 12, 1999. Their third child, Jaycee Ashton 
Brown, a daughter, was born on July 30, 2004. 




The Dean and Carol Hipwell 
Family 

Back L-R- Tayna, Jamie, 
Jesse and Jodi Brown 

Front - Jason, Carol & Dean 
with Jair Brown 



285 



Family Group Record- 1 1 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Lance Bradshaw STOKER-3278 




Bom 30 Mar 1952 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 4 May 1952 


place Roberts^ Jefferson, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


9 Apr 1960 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


8 Jun 1971 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Married 18 Sep 1975 


Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


SeaISp 


18 Sep 1975 


IFALL 


Husband's tamer Sheldon David STOKER- 1 1 53 




MRIN: 456 


Husbands mother Martha Emma BRADSHAW- 1 1 65 






wife Susan F 3UET-9 




Bom 24 Jul 1955 


Place Rigby, Jefferson, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr 4 Sep 1955 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 Aug 1963 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


18 Sep 1975 


IFALL 


Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






wife's fether Newell Augustus PIQUET-1 04 




MRIN: 1 


. 


wife's mother Madonna WEEKES-2 






Children List each child in order of birth. j lds ordinance dates 


Temple 


F 


Stephanie STOKER-3922 




Bom 23 May 1976 


Place American Fork, Utah, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 26 Mav 1976 


Place American Fork, Utah, Utah, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison Idaho 


Spouse 


Married Place j SeaISp 


F 


Sharese STOKER-3923 




Bom 12 Mar 1977 


Place Vancouver, Clark. Washington , USA 


Baptized 


30 Mar 1985 


IFALL 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


3 Jun 1998 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse Travis BECK-6814 




MRIN: 2038 


Married 4 Jun 1998 I Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho Tseaisp 


4 Jun 1998 


IFALL 


JL 


Joshua Bradshaw SI 


rOKER-3955 




Bom 15 Jan 1979 


Place Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


28 Feb 1987 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


27 Nov 1997 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse 






Married j Place j SeaISp 


M 


Jared Lance STOKER-3952 




Bom 30 May 1980 


Place Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


4 Jun 1988 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Jun 1999 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Kayla CALDWELL-6848 




MRIN: 2052 


Married 6 Mav 2005 Place SLAKE | SeaISp 


6 Mav 2005 


SLAKE 


M 


Devin Newell STOKER-3920 




Bom 4 Jun 1982 


Place Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


30 Jun 1990 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


2 Jan 2002 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse 


Married j Place j SeaISp 




Jeremy Roger STOKER-3917 




Bom 24 Dec 1983 


Place Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


4 Jan 1992 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 
SealPar 


27 Dec 2002 
BIC 


IFALL 


Died 


Place 




Buried 


Place 


Spouse 






Married ; Place | SeaISp 


Prepared by Carl Nykamp. 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 






E-mail address carK^srv. my rf.net 


Idaho 


Date prepared 27 May 2006 


83401 USA 







286 









Family Group Record- 1 1 






Page 2 of 2 


Husband Lance Bradshaw STOKER-3278 






wife Darlene Susan PIQUET-9 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


7 


M ! Dallin Keith STOKER-3954 






Bom 29 Jul 1985 Place Bellevue, Kinq, Washinaton, USA 


Baptized 


28 Aug 1993 






Chr. Tpiace 


Endowed 


14 Aug 2004 


IFALL 






Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried | Place 






Spouse 










Married ! Place 


SeaISp 


i 


8 


F Ashley Donnell STO 


KER-3950 






Bom 29 Jan 1988 


Place Sandy, Salt Lake. Utah, USA 


Baptized 


3 Feb 1996 




i 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BICi 


Buried 


Place 




Spouse 






9 




Married IPIace 


SeaISp 


| 


F 


Whitney Lauren STOKER-3890 




Bom 12 Oct 1990 


Place Sand_y, Salt Lake, Utah JJSA 


Baptized 


7 Nov 1998 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place 








Spouse 










Married | Place 


SeaISp 


i 
I 


10 


F 


Natalie Susan STOKER-3948 






Bom 19 Dec 1994 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


28 Dec 2002 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




Spouse 










Married | Place 


SeaISp 





4 Mar 2006 



287 




Darlene and Lance Stoker Family 
Back L-R- Dallin, Jared, Josh, Devin, Jeremy 
Front - Sharese, Whitney, Natalie, Darlene, Lance. Ashley 




Back L-R- Jared, Josh, Jeremy, Devin, Travis Beck, Dallin 
Middle - Lance, Darlene, Ashley, Jordan, Sharese Beck 
Front - Whitney, Natalie 



288 



DARLENE PIQUET & LANCE STOKER FAMILY 

Darlene and Lance met at BYU during their senior year. We were in the same ward and 
Lance invited me to attend a fireside at the Language Training Mission, where he was teaching 
the Thai missionaries. We courted that summer and were married September 18, 1975 in the 
Idaho Falls Temple. 

We both graduated in 1976 and welcomed our first baby, Stephanie. She was born two 
months premature and only lived three days. It was a challenge that no one is ever prepared for. 
We felt the Lord carried us through this time with many thoughtful family and friends. 

We moved to Vancouver, Washington to take a job with a computer company. Our 
second daughter, Sharese soon blessed our lives. We were soon transferred to Salt Lake City. 
We added four boys to our family, Josh, Jared, Devin, and Jeremy. Jeremy was born a month 
early with fluid in his lungs. He wasn't expected to live, but after many prayers and blessings he 
gained strength every day. We were told if he lived, he would suffer lung problems the rest of 
his life. He came home in 8 days but was very susceptible to pneumonia. We enjoyed a visit 
from Grandpa and Grandma Piquet, and Uncle Keith and Aunt Opal. He was coming down with 
pneumonia again so we had a blessing and then Aunt Opal offered a prayer. She called down the 
powers of heaven as we all shed tears. They left and Jeremy began coughing up phlegm so 
violently, I feared for his life. The doctor had me rush him to the hospital. For the first time in 
five months his lung x-rays were normal. There were many tears of gratitude. 

Lance's job took us to Kansas City next, then to Seattle. We added Dallin to our family. 
While in Seattle, President Benson issued the challenge that every member read The Book of 
Mormon. Josh was seven at the time and asked if he could read The Book of Mormon before he 
was baptized. It became a family goal every day and night. 

One stormy night we finished our scripture reading and Jared (5) was saying our family 
prayer. He paused a little long towards the end and then said, "Heavenly Father bless that no 
trees fall on our home tonight 1 '. Lance and I were taken back; we hadn't talked about the 
windstorm or the trees. During the night we felt and heard a big thud. We thought it might be an 
earthquake because the house shook. Early in the morning we awoke to a huge tree lying across 
the front of our home. We called the tree experts to come out. They were amazed as they looked 
at the roots that the tree hadn't fallen right through our home. I let Jared tell them about his 
prayer. They were witness to the faith of a child and the blessings of following the prophet. We 
had several other blessings of protection that year and all felt the power of The Book of Mormon 
and always love reading its' pages. 

When Dallin was a year old we moved back to Salt Lake City. Here we added Ashley 
and Whitney. After five boys in six years we were ready for some pink ruffles. Life was very 
busy with our children's activities. Lance traveled a lot for his job in sales. We were able to 
enjoy many fun trips away with his job. 

One of our fun memories was taking eight young children and both sets of grandparents 
to Disneyworld in Florida. We received a lot of attention with a large group. It was wonderful 
to spend time with grandparents when they were healthy and able to enjoy the sights. 

We moved to Idaho and Natalie was born. I taught dancing for 15 years, and Lance 
finished his MBA and CPA. All of the girls of age have received their Young Women 
Medallion. The boys all received their Eagle Scout Award. We enjoyed supporting them in all 
their activities. 



289 



We have enjoyed being by our families. The children have had many opportunities to 
work in the garden and on the farm. We were blessed to live by our parents for several years 
before they passed away. 

Lance served at BYU-I for four years. I am the primary president and he is teaching the 
eleven year olds. We have enjoyed all our church callings and look forward to serving a mission 
together. 

We have been blessed to have our five boys serve missions. Josh-Ohio, Jared-Taiwan, 
Devin- Philippines, Jeremy-Portugal, and Dallin-Mexico. 

Sharese graduated in sports medicine at BYU. She married Travis Beck, they live in 
Ohio. Travis is a sales rep and Sharese is a stay at home mom with Jordan 7, Emma 4, and Halle 
2. We wish they were closer to Idaho. 

Josh is getting his PhD in nuclear chemistry from Michigan State. He serves as Elder's 
Quorum President, and enjoys ultimate Frisbee and football. 

Jared just graduated from the University of Utah in Chinese. He married Kayla Caldwell. 
They have a sweet baby girl, Morgan. He works for a National Security Agency contractor, 
translating Chinese in Salt Lake City. 

Devin will soon graduate from University of Utah in Math. He teaches Elder's Quorum 
and sells phones at Verizon. He teaches ballroom dance. 

Jeremy goes to BYU studying business, buys and sells cars on the side, 
enjoys basketball, and detailing cars. He loves cross-country traveling for cars. 

Dallin loves sports, soccer, basketball, snowboarding and is a unicyclist. He will attend 
BYU-I when he returns from Mexico in August. 

Ashley will go to BYU-I this summer to pursue sports medicine. She loves soccer and 
teaching hip-hop dancing. She loves tending little children. 

Whitney loves reading, excels in school, and takes her karate serious. 

Natalie reads non-stop, ice skates, loves babysitting and plays piano. 

Our family has been so blessed because of the gospel and our righteous ancestors. We 
hope we can follow in their footsteps. 



290 




Travis & Sharese Stoker Beck Family 
Travis, Jordan, Emma, Halle, Sharese 




Jared & Kayla Stoker with baby Mor«an 



291 



Family Group Record- 12 





Husband Vernon John PIQUET-10 




! 




1 — 


Bom 21 Sep 1956 


Place Riqby, Jefferson, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




chr. 4 Nov 1956 


Place Ucon. Bonneville, Idaho 


Baptized 


31 Oct 1964 


I 




Died | Place 


Endowed 


18 Sep 1975 


SLAKE I 






Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Married 19 Mav 1978 


Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake. Utah, USA 


SeaISp 


19 Mav 1978! SLAKE 




Husband's father Newell AuquStUS PIQUET-104 




MRIN: 1 i 






Husband's mother Madonna WEEKES-2 




I 


wife Cynthia HARENBERG-3944 




i 






Bom 24Auq1958 Place Flagstaff, Coconino, Arizona, USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 






chr. 7 Sep 1958 


Place Flagstaff, Coconino, Arizona, USA 


Baptized 


10 Sep 1966 


! 




Died 


Place 


Endowed 


18 May 1978 


SLAKE J 




Buried 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


1 




wife's fatner Gary Sylvan HARENBERG-1 02 




MRIN: 52 


wife'smother Ann JORGENSEN-103 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


Tobv Vernon PIQUET-4475 




Bom 28 Sep 1979 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


5 Dec 1987 






chr. 4 Nov 1979 


piace Provo, Utah, Utah, USA 


Endowed 


19 Oct 1998 


PROVO 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse Debra Jean WYATT-6855 




MRIN: 2065 


2 




Married 15 Jun 2002 ! Place Logan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


15 Jun 2002 I LOGAN 


M 


Todd Michael PIQUET-3953 




Bom 16 Nov 1980 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1988 i 


I 


Chr. 7 Dec 1980 Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 


22 Jan 2002 I PROVO j 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


Bid 






Buried 


Place 








Spouse 




Married j Place 


SeaISp 




3 


F 


Cammie PIQUET-3947 




Bom 7Auq1982 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


29 Sep 1990 ! 




chr. 5 Sep 1982 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 


22 Jan 2002 


PROVO 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




i 


Buried ' Place 


i 


spouse Fredich Ashkii WOOLEY-6857 




MRIN: 2051 






Mamed 25 Jan 2002 I Place Salt Lake City, Utah. Utah 


SeaISp 


25 Jan 2002! SLAKE 


4 


F 


Shellie PIQUET-3942 






iBom 21 Feb 1984 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


29 Feb 1992 






chr 15 Apr 1984 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 






Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




I 

j 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse 










Married \ Place 


SeaISp 


I 


5 


M ! Daniel Scott PIQUET-3919 






Bom 12 Mav 1986 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Baptized 


4 Jan 1994 






chr 7 Sep 1986 


Place Ucon, Bonneville, Idaho, USA 


Endowed 


2 Nov 2005 


IFALL 




Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 








Spouse 




Married I Place 


SeaISp 




6 


il_ 


Erin Nicole PIQUET-3951 






L Bom 7 Jul 1989 


Place OremJJtah, Utah, USA 


Baptized 


2 Aug 1997 






chr. 6 Aug 1989 


Place Springville, Utah, Utah, USA 


Endowed 








Died j Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 






Buried ] Place 










Spouse 




Married ! Place 


SeaISp 


l 

i . _ 



292 




: ( 



Back: Todd, Toby & Debbie Piquet 

Middle: Erin, Vernon, Cindy, Fred & Camie Woollev, Cindy's mother 
Ann Harenberg Front: Daniel & Shellie 



-.^His^*»», 





v 





Katelyn Camille Woolley 



Taya Piquet 
Bom March 23. 2005 




293 



VERNON JOHN PIQUET AND CYNTHIA HARENBERG FAMILY 

Vernon (Vern) J. Piquet was born September 21, 1956. He was the second boy and tenth 
child of eleven, born to Newell Augustus Piquet and Madonna Weekes Piquet. 

Cynthia (Cindy) H. Piquet was born August 24, 1958. She was the second girl and third 
child of four, born to Gary Sylvan Harenberg and Ann Jorgensen Harenberg. 

On Friday, January 18, 1978 Vern decided to go to Rexburg, ID to a dance at the Star 
Palace Disco. He had been off of his mission for three months and he was trying to follow his 
missions president's advice, "Go home and get married". 

Cindy was living and going to school in Rexburg for the second year. She had been to 
the disco enough times during the first semester to know that she really didn't want to go 
anymore. She voiced this opinion to her roommates, but they would have none of it. Finally, 
after begging, cajoling and downright blackmail, they convinced her to go. 

Vern was looking over the many co-eds that night trying to decide which one would be 
the lucky one he would ask to dance, when he spied Cindy across the dance floor. Meanwhile, 
Cindy was getting more and more depressed as she watched her roommates get asked to dance, 
one by one, leaving her standing there alone. 

When all of a sudden she looked back over her shoulder and saw a very cute guy! There 
was a very quick conversation in her mind that went something like this: "Man, I wish that he 
would ask me to dance", followed immediately by, "He won't ask me to dance." Then, there 
was a tap on her shoulder and he said "Would you like to dance?" She was thrilled. When she 
asked him what his name was, the music was so loud that she thought that he said his name was 
"Burn"! 

Vern spent a lot of time in Rexburg over the next month and on Tuesday, February 14, 
1978 (yes, it was only one month later) Vern asked Cindy to marry him. She eventually said yes, 
which is another long story, and four months and five days after they met, they were married. 
On Friday, May 19, 1978, they were sealed for Time and all Eternity in the Salt Lake City 
Temple. 

Vern and Cindy had planned to have their first reception in Idaho Falls and then go 
through Yellowstone and then on to Denver where Vern served his mission, before going to 
Flagstaff, AZ for their second reception. Their first reception was on May 20 th and on the twenty 
first they attended a missionary farewell for Vern's Aunt Opal and Uncle Keith. Then on the 
22 n they borrowed Joan and Carl Nykamp's tent and left to spend one night at Fall Creek where 
Vern loved to fish. On Tuesday, May 23, 1978 they returned to Joan and Carl's to see if they 
could keep the tent and upon arriving there found out that Vern's brother Roger had been in a 
motorcycle accident. They rushed to the hospital and found him in critical condition. Roger 
passed away a few days later. They attended the funeral and then went on to Flagstaff, AZ for 
their second reception. 

Vern and Cindy's first home was in a mobile home in Idaho Falls, ID, that they bought 
from Uncle Monte Piquet's mobile home business. It was parked in Carol and Dean's yard on 
what was then called the "Phillips Place". It was there that their first pregnancy ended in a 
miscarriage. 

They live there for eight months. Cindy worked at a drapery business, sewing draperies 
and at a place where she sewed little girls dresses. Because there was no room for him to work 
on the farm, Vern worked at a machine ship called Idaho Steel. An opportunity came available 
for Vern to work at a machine shop in Springville, Utah, at a place called Val-Tek. They were 



294 



happy to move since the working conditions at Idaho Steel were less than desirable. So they 
moved their mobile home to a mobile home park in Provo, Utah. 

By this time Cindy was expecting again. It was in Provo, UT, on Friday, September 28, 
1979 that Toby Vernon Piquet was born. He was a beautiful baby with lots of black hair. He 
was a good mix between Vern and Cindy. Two of Toby's toes on his left foot were partially 
webbed. Vern was worried that he would swim in circles! Cindy had webbed toes on both of 
her feet, which by the way, some say is a sign of royalty! 

After one and one half years in Provo, UT, in the spring of 1980, Vein's dad asked him if 
he and Cindy would come back to work on the farm. He said yes, so they moved their little 
family back to Idaho. At the time Cindy was expecting their second baby. They bought the 
home that Carol and Dean had lived in, the one on the Phillips place. 

Todd Michael Piquet was born just 14 months after Toby, on November 16, 1980. He 
also was a beautiful baby, had dark hair but not quite as much. Everyone thought he looked like 
his Dad. 

Twenty-one months after Todd was born, during a Piquet family reunion, Vern and 
Cindy had their first little girl. She was born on August 7, 1982 and they named her Cammie 
Piquet. Everyone thought that she was beautiful and looked liker her dad! She also had a lot of 
dark hair. 

Just a short eighteen months later, on February 21, 1984, Shellie Piquet was born. Of 
course, she was also a beautiful baby and looked a lot like her mom. Her hair was a little lighter 
than Cammie' s. This new addition, gave Vern and Cindy four children that were ages four and 
under. It was a crazy time! 

After a short reprieve, a little over two years, Daniel Scott Piquet was born on May 12, 
1986. He was also beautiful, (what did you expect?), with lighter hair than the other boys. In 
fact, as he grew he became very blond. He also looked a lot like Vern. 

When Daniel was two and a half, Vern and Cindy decided to move back to Utah where 
Vern would go back to work at Val-Tek. At the time Cindy was two months pregnant with their 
third daughter and last child. They moved into a home in Springville, UT. 

Erin Nicole Piquet was born in Provo, Utah on July 7, 1989. She was also a beautiful 
baby and had dark hair. Erin was born with two of the toes on her right foot webbed. Now she 
and Toby could hold hands and swim straight, according to Vern! Because her toes were 
webbed on the opposite side from their oldest child, Toby, and taking into account that there 
were approximately ten years between their first and last, and that they had three of each sex, 
Vern and Cindy took this as sign that they were done having children! 

Toby played sports, the trumpet in the school band and the drums in the marching band, 
sang in the choir and was on a ballroom dance team. He served a mission in the Fresno, CA 
area, then went on to college at Utah State. 

Todd also played sports and was a very good artist. He also sang in the choir and was on 
the ballroom dance team. He served a mission in the Washington, DC south area. He went on 
the college at Utah Valley State College. 

Cammie played sports when she was younger. She played the flute and loved to dance. 
She went on to college at Utah Valley State College. 

Shellie played the flute and on the drum line. She also played sports when she was 
younger. 

Daniel played sports, the cello in the orchestra and was on the drum line in the school 
band. 



295 



Erin played sports, the cello in the orchestra, was a part of the youth symphony and 
played at Abravenell Hall in Salt Lake City, Utah, and played volleyball on a city team. 

Vern and Cindy lived with their family in Springville, Utah for fifteen years and many 
things happened during that time. 

In September of 1995, Vern's mother passed away. It was a sad time. 

In July of 1998 Vern quit his job at Val-Tek to start his own trucking business, PK 
Transport, Inc. They eventually owned six trucks. Cindy missed the regularity of Val-Tek, but 
Vern enjoyed being his own boss. 

From October of 1998 to October of 2000 Toby served a mission to the Fresno, CA area. 

On January 25, 2002, Cammie married Fredrich Ashkii Woolley in the Salt Lake City 
Temple. He continues to be a great addition to Vern and Cindy's family. 

Shellie moved out of the house in February of that year. After a time she went back east 
to be a nanny for a family there. 

From February of 2002 to October of 2003 Todd served a mission in the Washington DC 
South area. 

In March of 2002, Cindy's father passed away. It was another sad time for them. 

On June 15, 2002, Toby married Debra Jean Wyatt in the Logan Temple. She has 
become a cherished addition to Vern and Cindy's family. 

During this short 6 months, Vern and Cindy went from having six children, to two 
children living at home. This was quite a shock to them! 

In November of 2002, Cindy's mother came to live with them. 

In July of 2003, Vern's father passed away. This was hard for the whole family. Vern 
wanted so much to move to Idaho and purchase the farm, so he started trying to sell PK 
Transport, Inc. Vern moved to Idaho to harvest his dad's crop and to make financial 
arrangements. Vern and Cindy sold all of the PK Transport, Inc. equipment except for one truck, 
and they were able to purchase a portion of the farm. Cindy, Erin and Cindy's mom, Ann, 
moved to Idaho Falls to live in Newell and Madonna's house in August of 2004. 

On March 18, 2004 Cammie and Fred had their first baby, Vern and Cindy's first 
grandchild. They named her Katelyn Camille Woolley. She is a joy to them all. 

On March 23, 2005 Toby and Debbie's first baby was born. Her name is Taya Piquet. 

Vern and Cindy feel very blessed to have such a wonderful family. They are looking 
forward to more achievements, weddings and a lot more grandchildren as life continues on. 

Vernon Piquet was called as bishop of the Milo Ward, Ucon, Idaho, stake April 16, 2006. 



296 







Family Group Record- 13 






Page 1 of 1 




Husband Spencer Lane PIQUET-1 1 










| Bom 16 Jan 1961 Place Riqbv, Jefferson, Idaho 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




I Chr. ] Place 


Baptized 


1 Feb 1969 






| Died | Place 


Endowed 


17 Apr 1980 


LSLAKE 




l Burled ! Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






I Married 29 Apr 1983 (D) i Place MESA, Maricopa, Arizona, USA 


SeaISp 


29 Apr 1983 


MESA 




[Husbancfs father Newell AUQUStUS PiQUET-104 






MRIN 1 




i Husband's mother Madonna WEEKES-2 










wife Sherianne FRAZIER-3946 










i Bom 26 Nov 1959 ! Place Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. USA 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




j Chr. j Place 


Baptized 


10 Dec 1967 






| Died Place 


Endowed 


Mar 1981 






Buned ! Place 


SealPar 


BIC 


1 




other spouse Donald S. MCNEIL-1 1 28 






MRIN: 441 




I Married 1 NOV 1991 i Place 


SeaISp 








I wife's father Ronald Vem FRAZIER-61 9 






MRIN: 181 




| wife's mother Anne MARTI N-367 










Children List each child in order of birth 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


1 


F j Jacquelyn Anne Piquet MCNEIL-3962 










I Bom 16 Mar 1984 I Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho. USA 


Baptized 


28 Mar 1992 






i Chr. | Place 


Endowed 


14 May 2005 


MINNE i 




| Died ; Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried | Place 






i 




I Spouse 






! 




! Married J Place 


SeaISp 






2 


M i Lane Spencer Conner Piquet MCNEIL-3949 










Bom 12 Apr 1985 ! Place MESA. Maricopa. Arizona. USA 


Baptized 


29 May 1993 






iChr. 


Place 


Endowed 






'Died 


Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






I Buried 


Place 




I Spouse 






! 
I 




Married ; Place 


SeaISp 




! 


3 


F i Danielle Christianne Piquet MCNEIL-3945 










I Bom 5Mav1986 Place MESA. Maricopa, Arizona. USA 


Baptized 


14 Mav 1994 






! Chr. ! Place 


Endowed 








j Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried ! Place 










| Spouse 










| Married j Place 


SeaISp 




1 


4 


M j Caleb Michael Piquet MCNEIL-3921 










iBom 8 Feb 1988 


Place MESA, Maricopa, Arizona, USA 


Baptized 


27 Apr 1996 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






j Died ! Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried j Place 










! Spouse 




j Married [ Place 


SeaISp 




i 



! Prepared by 



' Phone 



Carl Nykamp 
208-523-7378 



E- maii a ddress cari@srv,myrf.net 

D ate prepared 20 Mar 2006 



Address 14054 N 65 E 

Idah o Fa lls 

Ida ho 

83401 ...JJSA.. 



297 



SPENCER LANE PIQUET 

Spencer's mother, Madonna, wrote, "I still felt I should have another boy. On January 
16, 1961, Spencer was born at the Maternity Home in Rigby. Dr. Tall planned to be out of town 
so he said to come the evening of the day the baby was due. Newell waited around all night but 
nothing happened so Dr. tall started me and Spencer was born about 8:00 the next morning. He 
was cute and chubby at 8 Vi lbs." 

"When Spencer was two weeks old, we moved down the basement and began to remodel 
our home. We took the whole inside out of it and rebuilt it. There was so much noise upstairs 
that I kept music playing to help him sleep. The kids all loved to play with the new baby after 
four years without one. It took about a month to finish the house and it was wonderful to move 
up into the sunshine and light again." Our family has always said that that time with the radio 
and good music is what made Spencer such a musician. He had perfect pitch, loved to dance and 
was on the dance team. Even as a small child he would beat his hand to the music. He was in 
the choirs in high school and could have been part of the accapella choir at BYU. He loved 
dancing so much that he went that direction with his music instead. 

Spencer was born to Madonna Weekes and Newell Augustus Piquet. He was the last 
baby in the family of eight girls and three boys. They lived on a farm in Ucon, Idaho. Spencer 
never did enjoy the farm as much as he did the mechanics shop his dad had to fix the cars, 
tractors etc. of the neighborhood. Spencer didn't really like to fix the cars but he knew all the 
vehicles, the size of the engines and every detail about them. His dad would ask him, rather than 
look it up. He learned easily and had such a quick mind. He has always loved cars. 

His mother also said of him, "He loved music, cats, dogs, ducks, plants and people from 
an early age. He entertained and made welcome everyone who came to our place. He went 
through school with a song and a breeze instead of books." He has always had a soft heart and 
has been very articulate as he has worked with so many people. 

Spencer attended Bonneville High School. By then he had grown to about 6" 5" so he 
had the coaches after him to play basketball. That was not his thing. He sang in the choirs and 
danced. Everyone who knows him will tell you that he has the most beautiful hand writing of 
anyone they know. He was very artistic in many ways. Following high school he attended Ricks 
College for one semester before leaving for his mission to Korea. He became fluent in the 
Korean language and could write it almost as fast as English. 

When he returned from Korea he went to BYU for a time. There he met Sharianne 
Frazier from his mission and they dated. They were married in the Mesa, Arizona Temple on 
April 29, 1983. Spencer worked for his dad on the farm for a short time after they were married 
but she wanted to be closer to her family, so they moved to Mesa, where Spencer painted houses 
for a living. They had four beautiful children; Jacquelyn, born March 16, 1984, Lane Spencer, 
born April 12, 1985, Danielle Christianne, born May 5, 1986 and Caleb Michael, born February 
8, 1988. They lived in Mesa for a while after Caleb was born and then had a job opportunity in 
Los Angeles, California so they moved there. Spencer worked for a car dealership for a year or 
so but their already failing marriage ended in divorce. 

Spencer then had an opportunity to work in a sock company owned by a group of Korean 
people. He was their key man for several years, traveling to Korea many times and setting up 
accounts with different stores here in the State to sell their socks. His love for those people and 
the country of Korea made him an excellent employee. Then another sock company there in Los 
Angeles hired him to do the same thing for them this past year. He has been happy with them 



298 



although it has been a hard job to get the distribution system organized and whipped into shape, 
but Spencer knew how and has worked hard at it. He enjoys it a great deal too. He speaks 
Spanish fluently also and most of the employees in this plant are Spanish, so he is able to 
communicate with them as well as the Korean owners. He has been living with Marco Gutierrez 
and his son, Robert, for the past number of years. 

Spencer is a very hard worker but he also has a great sensitivity to people. He had good 
parents and his sisters loved to tend him when he was young. He has been a real asset to his 
family who care deeply about him. When his brother, Roger, died many years ago, Spencer 
stepped in and became a close friend and brother to his wife, Analee. They have had a special 
relationship ever since. He has shown many times how thoughtful and kind he is is. 

This article is taken from Madonna Piquet's writing and was compiled by Joan Piquet Nykamp 
and Nola Piquet Bryan, March 2005 




Back: Caleb, Danielle, Spencer 
Front: Jacque, Lane 



299 



MISSIONARY DESCENDANTS OF NEWELL AND MADONNA PIQUET 

Ricky Harris - San Diego North California Mission- 1986-1988 

Steven Harris - Lansing, Michigan Mission- 1996-1998 

Kevin Harris - Guatemala City Central Mission- 1986-1988 

Bruce Nykamp - Virginia, Roanoke Mission- 1 986- 1 988 

Carleen Nykamp - Philippines, Davo Mission- 1 990- 1 99 1 

Bradley Nykamp - Indiana, Indianapolis Mission- 1 989- 1 99 1 

Ryan Nykamp - Guatemala City Central Mission- 1994-1996 

Idonna Murray - Great Lakes Mission- 1 966- 1 968 

Nathan Murray - Scotland Edinburg Mission- 1 993- 1 995 

Laura Murray - Uruguay Montevideo Mission- 1999-2001 

Mike Murray - San Bernardino, California Mission- 2006-2008 

Clint Allen - Argentina, Salta Mission- 2001-2003 

Nola Bryan - New Zealand South Mission- 1 970- 1 97 1 

Ed Bryan - Anaheim, California Spanish Speaking Mission- 1999-2001 

Marie Bryan - Rapid City, South Dakota Mission- 2003-2004 

Roger Piquet - Great Lakes Mission- 1 968- 1 970 

Robbie Nielsen - Jacksonville, Florida Mission- 2000-2002 

Jason Hipwell - Campinas, Brazil Mission- 1993-1995 

Jamie Hipwell - Boston, Mass. & Cambodia Missions- 1994-1996 

Josh Stoker - Columbus, Ohio Mission- 1998-2000 

Jared Stoker - Taichung, Taiwan Mission- 1999-2001 

Devin Stoker- Philippines, Bacolod Mission- 2001-2003 

Jeremy Stoker - Portugal Porto Mission- 2002-2004 

Dallin Stoker - Mexico, Tampico Mission- 2004-2006 

Vernon Piquet - Denver, Colorado Mission- 1975-1977 

Toby Piquet - San Jose, California Mission- 1998-2000 

Todd Piquet - Washington, DC South Mission- 2002-2004 

Daniel Piquet - Ukraine, Donetsk Mission- 2005-2007 

Spencer Piquet - Korea, Pusan Mission- 1980-1982 

Jacquelyn McNeil - Uruguay, Montevideo Mission- 2005-2006 

Caleb McNeil 

Clancy Allen 



300 



Sidney Weekes 



& 



Susan Elizabeth 
Pilgrim 



Family 



4&5 



301 



302 



Family Group Record- 25 



Page 1 of 1 



1 



Husband Sidney WEEKES-1 1 66 


i 
! 

i 
j 


Bom 8 Mar 1842 I Place Bexley, Kent, Enqland 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


cur 10 Mav 1842 i Place Bexlev, Walllnq, Kent, England 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1851 


I 


Died 14 Apr 1909 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


Endowed 


24 Nov 1862 


EHOUSJ 


Buried 16 Apr 1909 


Place Archer, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


22 Jul 1885 


LOGAN j 


Married 16 Jul 1864 


Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


16 Jul 1864 


EHOUS 


other spouse Annie Bennet HARRIS-1 304 






MRIN: 469 


Married 4 Oct 1878 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 






Husbancfs rather Robert WEEKES-1 1 73 






MRIN: 470 


Husbands mother Mary Ann BALDRY-1 1 74 






] 


wife Susan Elizabeth PILGRIM-1167 


I 


Bom 10 Sep 1835 


Place St. Giles, Cambridqe, Cambridqe, Enqland 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr 


Place 


Baptized 


29 Mar 1851 


i 




Died 1 May 1888 


Place Smithfield. Cache, Utah 


Endowed 


16 Jul 1864 


EHOUSJ 




Buried Mav 1888 


Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 


SealPar 


24 Oct 1894 


LOGAN i 




WHesfather Samuel PILGRIM-1 185 






MRIN: 471 


wife's mother Elizabeth (Betsy) COOTE-1 1 86 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


F ! Elizabeth Susan WEEKES-1 168 




Bom 10 Nov 1865 Place Smithfield, Cache, Utah 


Baptized 


3 Aug 1876 I 


Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


22 Feb 1893 


LOGAN 


Died 7 Sep 1937 Place Smithfield, Cache, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 


I 


Buried 9 Sep 1937 i Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 








spouse Newton WOODRUFF-1 305 






MRIN: 472 


Mamed 2 Oct 1903 ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


2 Oct 1903 


SLAKE 


M George Sidney WEEKES-1 169 




Bom 18 Sep 1867 i Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 


Baptized 


3 Auq 1876 


! 




Chr. ! Place 


Endowed 


27 Nov 1891 


LOGAN ' 




Died 9 Auq 1940 I Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 


t 


Burred 12 Auq 1940 I Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 








spouse Mary Ann BRIGGS-1 306 






MRIN: 473 


Married 27 Nov 1891 I Place Loqan, Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


27 Nov 1891 


LOGAN 


F i Rebecca Jane WEEKES-1 1 70 


_, 


Bom 29 Sep 1869 Place Smithfield, Cache, Utah 


Baptized 


5 Sep 1879 




Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


20 Feb 1891 


t TbGAN~ l 


Died 12 Sep 1942 Place 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried i Place Loqan Cemetery, LOGAN. Cache. Utah 






l 


spouse Christian JENSEN-1 307 






MRIN: 474 


Married 12 Feb 1891 j Place 


SeaISp 






spouse Thomas TERRY-1 308 






MRIN: 475 


Married 14 Oct 1908 ! Place Loqan Temple. LOGAN. Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


14 Oct 1908 


LOGAN 


F ! Sarah Ann WEEKES-1 171 




Bom 29 Auq 1871 I Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 


Baptized 


29 Auq 1879 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


7 Mar 1894 


I SLAKE 

I 




Died 11 May 1947 I Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 14 Mav 1947 I Place Archer, Madison. Idaho 










spouse Henry Alvin MUNNS-1309 






MRIN: 476 




Married 7 Mar 1894 


place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


7 Mar 1894 


r SLAKE -1 




John Samuel WEEK 


ES-25 


feom 8 Sep 1873 


place SMITHFIELD, Cache, Utah 


Baptized 


8 Sep 1881 


1 




V 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Oct 1896 


LOGAN 




Died 22 Apr 1956 


Place SUNNYDELL. Madison. Idaho 


SealPar 


21 Oct 1896 


, 




Buried 25 Apr 1956 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 










Spouse Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVER-1349 






MRIN: 2 




Married 20 Nov 1894 I Place Lyman. Fremont. Idaho 


SeaISp 


21 Oct 1896 


r LOGAN" 


| M William Henry WEEKES-1172 


! 


Bom 8 Sep 1875 


Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 


Baptized 


8 Sep 1883 


j 


Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Oct 1900 


loganI 

- 


Died 15 Mar 1900 


Place Green River, Wyominq 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Mar 1900 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 




Spouse 










Married Place 


SeaISp 







10 Mar 2006 



303 



Family Group Record- 469 



> 

u 

Q 

D 

— 
> 

Q 



1 Husband Sidney WEEKES-1 1 66 




Bom 8 Mar 1842 i Place Bexley, Kent, England 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




chr. 10 May 1842 Place Bexley, Walling, Kent, England 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1851 




Died 14 Apr 1909 {place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


Endowed 


24 Nov 1862 


EHOUS ' 




Buried 16 Apr 1909 I Place Archer, Fremont. Idaho 


SealPar 


22JuM885 


LOGAN 




Married 4 Oct 1878 i Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 




other Spouse Susan Elizabeth PILGRIM-1167 




SeaISp 


MRIN 25 




Married 16 Jul 1864 i Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 




16 Jul 1864! EHOUS 


Husbands father Robert WEEKES-1 1 73 


MRIN: 470 




Husbands mother Marv Ann BALDRY OR BAULDR-1 1 74 




wife Annie Bennet HAR 




Bom 9 Sep 1857 


Place Carieon, Monmouth, England 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


11 Dec 1869 






Died 24 Jan 1926 


Place Sunnydale, Fremont, Idaho 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1873 


EHOUS 




Buried 29 Jan 1926 


Place Suitton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


18 Nov 1949 


IFALL 




other spouse Joseph HARRIS-6921 


MRIN: 543 




Married 15 Dec 1873 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah I Seais P 


15 Dec 1873 I EHOUS 


wife's father William BENNET-6919 


MRIN: 544 


wife's mother Martha MATTHEW-6920 


Children List each child in order of birth. lds ordinance dates Temple 


F 


Eunice WEEKES-6792 




Bom 5 Mar 1881 


Place Smithfield, Cache, Utah 


Baptized 


13May1889X 


Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Oct 1900 LOGAN 


D.ed 28 Mar 1896 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 


Buried Mar 1896 ' 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 


spouse unmarried -4481 


MRIN: 3482 


Married | Place | SeaISp 


F Lucinda WEEKES-6793 




Bom 27 Jul 1882 i Place Smithfield, Cache, Utah 


Baptized 


7Auq1890j 




Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


18 Aug 1890 


Died 4 Apr 1896 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 


Buried Apr 1896 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 




spouse unmarried -6923 


MRIN: 3483 




Married unmarried I Place [ SeaISp 


F 


Jane WEEKES-6794 




Bom 15 Nov 1883 Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 


Baptized 


7 Aug 1892 




Chr. l Place 


Endowed 


25 Nov 1908 




Died 29 Jan 1926 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 


Buried 31 Jan 1926 I Place Archer. Madison, Idaho 


Spouse 


Married [ Place | SeaISp 


M 


Joseph Charles WEEKES-6795 




Bom 1 Jul 1885 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 1 Jul 1885 


Place Sunnydell Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 


Buried 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 




spouse unmarried -731 1 


MRIN: 3695 




Married | Place | SeaISp 




F 


Emily WEEKES-679I 


3 




Bom 29 May 1886 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1894 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Apr 1967 




Died 15 Apr 1896 


Place Sunnydell, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 


Buried Apr 1896 


place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 




Spouse Unmarried -7312 


MRIN: 3613 


Married Place [ SeaISp 


I 


M 


Albert Joshua WEEKES-6797 


i 




Bom 24 Jan 1888 


Place Lyman, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Aug 1917 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


12 Dec 1917 






Died 7 Dec 1966 


Place Sunnydell, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 


Buried 10 Dec 1966 Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 




Prepared by Catl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 


E-maii address carl(5)srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date prepared 4 Mar_2006 


83401 USA 



304 



Family Group Record- 469 





Husband Sidney WEEKES-1 1 66 






wife Annie Bennet HARRIS-1 304 




I 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


6 


M Albert Joshua WEEKES-6797 






spouse Florence Malinda WILCOX-6924 




MRIN 3484 


i 


Manned 28 Nov 1911 i Place St. Anthony. Fremont, Idaho 


SeaISp 




spouse Leah Oakley SMOUT-6925 




MRIN: 3485 I 






Married 27 Jan 1914 ! Place Butte, Silver Bow. Montana 


SeaISp 




7 


F | Mable WEEKES-6798 






Bom 21 Feb 1890 j Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jan 1898 






Chr j Place 


Endowed 


23 Jun 1916, 






Died 3 Apr 1915 Place Victor, Teton, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 19901 IFALL 




Buried 6 Apr 1915 i Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 








Spouse unmarried -6926 




MRIN: 3486 




Married unmamedTPIace 


SeaISp 




8 


M 1 1 






Bom 16 Oct 1891 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


1 Jun 1990 1 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


15 Apr 1994 




Died 11 Feb 1910 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 1 IFALL 




Buried Feb 1910 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison. Idaho 




^Spouse unmarried -6927 




MRIN: 3487 






Married unmarried Place ] SeaISp 


i 


9 


F 


LaVon WEEKES-6800 






Bom 1 Oct 1893 Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


6 Jul 1902] 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


30 Mar 1932 






Died 25 Jan 1960 { Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 




Buried 28 Jan 1960 ! Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 








spouse Julius Frank SPAULDING-6928 




MRIN: 3488 






Mamed 30 Mar 1932 i Place Loaan, Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


30 Mar 1932 I LOGAN 





M 


Leo Roy WEEKES-6801 






Bom 23 Jul 1895 i Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


5 Jun 1904 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


10 Apr 1967 






Died 19Jun1966 


place Sunnydell, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 




Buried 22Jun1966 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison. Idaho 










Spouse unmarried -6929 




MRIN: 3489 




Married unmarried I Place 


SeaISp 




1 


M ! Cyril WEEKES-6802 






Bom 29 Sep 1896 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


30 Aug 1905 i 


j 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


13 Jun 1923 1 


Died 13 Aug 1969 


Place Rexburg, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990! IFALL 


Buried 16Auq1969 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 






spouse Ivy (Iva) ALLEN-6930 




MRIN: 3490^ 






Married 13 Apr 1918 I Place Rexbura. Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


23 Jun 1923 1 SLAKE 


2 


F 


Florence WEEKES (Twin)-6803 






Bom 10 Jul 1898 


place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


3 Jul 1908 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


11 Jan 1933 






Died 16 Aug 1931 | Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990 


IFALL 




Buried 19 Auq 1931 i Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 








Spouse 






Married j Place 


SeaISp 


I 


3 


F 


Ethel WEEKES (Twin)-6804 






Bom 10 Jul 1898 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


Child I 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






D-ed 10JUM898 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Jul 19901 IFALL 






Buried Jul 1898 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison, Idaho 








Spouse unmarried -6931 




MRIN: 3491 




Married Unmarried i Place 


SeaISp 




4 


M 


Clarence Arthur WEEKES-6805 






Bom 27 May_1901 


Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jul 19091 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9Apr_1919! 




Died 27 Jun 1988 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


10 Feb 1990! IFALL 






Buried 1 Jul 1988 i Place Ri ittnn C.pmfiifirv Arrher Mariisnn Idaho 








spouse Pearl Cleo BEE-6932 




MRIN. 3492 




Mamed 4 Nov 1926 I Place Logan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


4 Nov 1926 i LOGAN 



4 Mar 2006 



305 




le n t K XJ&mx ry mrt 




^w«"<jrvH*:<l 



Sidney Weekes 



Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim 




306 



Home of Sidney and Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim Weekes at 



,nd 



245 West 2 nu South, Smithfield, Utah, 
and still stands in 1995. 



It was built about 1 860 





Upper Back: Sarah, Rebecca, William 
Front: George, Elizabeth, John 

Left: Sarah Ann, Elizabeth Susan, Rebecca Jane 



307 



SIDNEY WEEKES 

Sidney Weekes was born March 8, 1 842 at Welling, Kent County, England. He was the 
tenth child of Robert and Mary Ann Baldry Weekes. These are his brothers and sisters beginning 
with the eldest: Robert, John, Elizabeth, Mary Ann, Samuel, Eunice, Benjamin, David, Edith and 
his younger sister Emma. 

Robert and Mary Ann had a large estate where they raised grain, hay, potatoes, fruits and 
animals. When the Elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints found the family, 
Samuel, one of their oldest children was first to accept the gospel message. Later on August 19, 
1849, his mother Mary Ann and son, 13 year old David, were baptized in the Welling Branch of 
the London Conference. Sidney was baptized by his older brother Samuel on December 3, 1851. 
He was confirmed by Elder Morrison. 

Samuel was anxious to come to America. Samuel, Benjamin (his younger brother) and 
Charles Jones, their sister Mary Ann's husband, left their homeland in the spring of 1 852. After 8 
weeks at sea, they landed in New Orleans, Louisiana. Sam married and remained there. The 
others continued their journey west with a company of Saints. However, while crossing the Platte 
River, Benjamin drowned. He was laid to rest in a lonely grave along the trail. Charles continued 
on to the Salt Lake Valley and built a home for his family. Charles' wife, Mary Ann and their 3 
small children had left England to meet Charles. On September 3, 1852, he learned they were 
near the valley and walked to meet them. Near the mouth of Emigration Canyon he joined them. 
Mary Ann was walking, carrying their two and a half year old baby with a little daughter at each 
side hanging on to her long skirt. It was a joyful reunion-their 7th wedding anniversary. Mary 
Ann was the first member of the Robert and Mary Ann Weekes family to reach the Salt Lake 
Valley. 

Robert Weekes' health was not the best, and he was reluctant to leave his home in 
England, however, he was baptized January 26, 1853. About one month later, February 28, he 
chose to accompany his wife and four youngest children on their journey to the West. They left 
Liverpool, England, on the good ship "International" under the presidency of Christopher Arthur. 
They arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana, on April 23 in good condition. 

A river steamer carried them up the Mississippi River to Keokuk, Iowa. They traveled 
overland by wagon train to Council Bluffs, Iowa. Then they traveled to the Salt Lake Valley in 
Company Eleven with the Perpetual Emigration Saints. While crossing the dusty plains, adults 
were required to walk most of the way. Robert traveled on foot many miles, but as days passed 
slowly by, his health failed to the point he could no longer walk. He was placed in the wagon 
with his head on a pillow in the lap of his little daughter, Emma. This eased the jolting of the 
wagon over the rough road. He grew steadily worse and on September 14, 1853, he passed away. 
His body was laid to rest on the trail near Fort Laramie. Mary Ann, his heroic wife, said later of 
his passing, "It was best that way. I doubt that his faith would have been strong enough to endure 
the severe hardships and trials his family passed through." 

Mary Ann and her children David 17, Edith 15, Sidney 12, and Emma 7, entered the Salt 
Lake Valley on September 17, 1853. They were sent to Lehi, an English settlement a few miles 
south of Salt Lake City. Seven years later, they were sent to Smithfield, nearly 100 miles north. 
Here they made a permanent home. Twice they planted crops only to have them destroyed by 
crickets. The next years were very hard. They were building a new home, paying their debt to the 
Perpetual Emigration Fund, and trying to provide food and clothing for the family. It required all 
the faith and strength they could muster. Out of necessity, they dug sego bulbs, picked and ate 



308 



tender shoots of thistle, willow and other plants. Dandelions and pig weeds were cooked and 
used as greens. There was an acute shortage of flour, grains for cereal, sugar, milk, butter and 
other basic foods. Mary Ann and her daughters, like Ruth of old, gleaned in the field where ever 
they were permitted. The precious heads of wheat were taken home, threshed by hand and 
ground through the coffee mill to make flour. Sidney said, "During those trying years, I seldom 
had enough to satisfy my hunger, but left part of my portion so mother and the girls could have a 
little more." 

In 1859, Sam, Sidney's older brother, decided he would like to bring his family west. 
Sidney would drive an ox team back across the plains and bring his family to Utah. Sam had 
arranged to drive another outfit so Sidney was responsible for the family and his own outfit. His 
mother's heart filled with grief each time she thought about the trip, having already laid to rest on 
the plains her husband and son Benjamin. There was little time for anxiety. Sidney had to have 
trousers to go in. Mary Ann had to make them by hand. 

First she sewed small pieces of material together, cut the trousers out and sewed them by 
hand. When he returned in October, he had grown so tall they came nearly to his knees. His 
mother sobbed aloud as she looked, then held him in her arms. 

In 1863, Sidney met a very charming young lady, Susan Pilgrim. She was the tenth and 
youngest daughter of Samuel and Betsy Coote Pilgrim. She was born September 10, 1836, in St. 
Giles, Cambridge, England. Her father died when she was 2 years old. Susan held a very special 
place in her mother's heart, whom she'd helped to support and care for. 

When Susan first heard the gospel, she had a strong conviction it was true. She was 
baptized December 30, 1851, at age 15. Her mother's attitude at that time toward the LDS 
Church was friendly. In fact, when her son, Thomas was critically ill with small pox and doctors 
held little hope for his life, Susan said, "Mother, in our church we have Elders who administer to 
and bless the sick. Often they're healed." 

"Send for them quickly," said the anxious mother. The Elders came and administered to 
him, and he was healed. No doubt this incident strengthened her faith; but she still didn't choose 
to join the church. 

A little later, Thomas and his older sister, Rebecca, left their family and homeland and 
came to America. This irritated their mother and she became bitter against them and the church. 
Susan wanted more than anything to accompany Thomas and her sister, Rebecca, but being the 
youngest child, felt an obligation to stay and take care of her mother. Susan worked as a 
supervisor for a laundry near Cambridge. 

Her family had an elaborate home with orchards and vineyards and could have provided 
funds for her fare to America. However, because of their opposition to the church, Susan worked 
and saved on her own. When her mother passed away November 30, 1862, she immediately 
made plans to immigrate to America. She sailed on the ship, Amazon, with H. K. Hovey as 
captain. They sailed from London, England, June 4, 1863, with 895 persons aboard. All were 
converts to the LDS Church. Susan joined her sister, Rebecca Goates, in Lehi, Utah. One day 
their brother, Thomas came to visit them. He persuaded Susan to return to Smithfield and keep 
house for him. She did and soon met one of his friends, Sidney Weekes. 

Susan was a charming person, refined and gentle, with a sweet disposition but firm when 
necessary. She was slightly taller than average, had beautiful long brown hair and eyes. She 
disliked anyone to tell her they were black. She was a very neat housekeeper and did beautiful 
handwork (It always took blue ribbons at the State Fair). She loved flowers and grew them 



309 



outside as well as indoors. Fuschias and geraniums were her favorites. Her brother, Thomas, had 
brought them from England. 

Sidney loved Susan dearly and won her heart as well as her promise to be his wife. They 
traveled by ox team and covered wagon July 16, 1864, to Salt Lake City and were married and 
sealed for time and eternity in the Endowment House. 

Their home was built on the foundation of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, humility and 
prayer. The priesthood was honored and exercised often in the healing of their loved ones and 
others. Sidney magnified his callings in the priesthood and enjoyed a special gift of healing. The 
Word of Wisdom and the law of tithing were strictly observed. Obedience to gospel principles 
brought joy and love into their lives. It was said by their children as well as others who knew 
them, "We've never heard them speak a cross word to each other." 

Six children blessed their home. Elizabeth Susan born November 10, 1865; George 
Sidney, September 18, 1867; Rebecca Jane, September 29, 1869; Sarah Ann, August 29, 1871; 
John Samuel, September 8, 1873 and William Henry, September 8, 1875. They were taught early 
in life to be thrifty and industrious. The axiom, "Waste not, want not," found daily application in 
their home. They understood they could have plenty to eat but certainly they should clean their 
plates well and waste nothing. 

They attended meetings regularly. Fast and testimony meetings were held Thursday 
afternoon. They attended school in Smithfield and used small individual slates in place of tablets. 
They sat on hewed logs for seats. At home they played in their large yard, enjoyed a swing, 
teeter totter and ball games. Their favorite pets were furry white rabbits with pink eyes and a 
bluish white dog, who helped herd cows. 

Their large garden and orchard provided a substantial part of each day's menu, and the 
children helped take care of both. They accompanied their mother into the fields where they 
carefully pulled cockle and other weeds from the crop. At an early age they helped with the 
harvest. Their father cut the grain by hand with a scythe, gathered it in the cradle, emptied it in 
bunches with hands full of grain straw and stood it in shocks so it could be gathered with the 
wagon and horses. Susan selected some of the best straw, steamed it, sewed and fashioned it into 
hats for Sidney and the children. The children cut and carried wood for the large fireplace in their 
home on which the family's cooking and baking was done. 

Their new adobe home was built in 1869. In early morning and late evening hours after 
work Sidney made and carried adobes to the mason who built it. This home was of sturdy 
construction and attractive. It remains standing today (1972) having given 103 years of service. It 
is located at 245 W 2nd S in Smithfield, Utah. Large windows and siding have been added to 
modernize it. Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Lowe, relatives of Sidney's, are the present owners. 

One day while conversing with Susan, Sidney asked how she felt about plural marriage, 
which was then being practiced. Her answer came without hesitation. "If one principle is true, 
Sidney, they're all true." After due consideration it was decided that Sidney should marry a 
second wife. His choice was Annie Bennett Harris, a young widow with two little girls. Her 
husband had been killed while hauling wood. 

Annie was the daughter of William and Martha Matthews Bennett. She was born in 
Carleca, Monmouthshire, England, on September 9, 1857. She was baptized on December 11, 
1 869 and immigrated to America with her mother and a half brother. She came to America on 
the ship S. S. Idaho. In Utah she met Joseph Harris, whom she married October 4, 1 873 for time 
and eternity in the Endowment House. They had two little girls. Beatrice Annie, January 10, 
1875 and Martha Elizabeth, March 29, 1877. 



310 



Sidney and Annie were married October 4, 1 878, for time only in the Endowment House. 
Susan accompanied them. Annie shared the family home. Three other girls were born there: 
Eunice; March 5. 1880, Lucinda, July 27, 1882, and Jane, November 15, 1883. 

In 1884, Idaho had not gained statehood, but settlers were moving in to homestead land. 
The Snake River promised plenty of water for rich virgin soil. Opportunity for expansion seemed 
most favorable so it was decided that Sidney should take the boys, George, 17, John, 11 and 
Rebecca, 15 and Annie to Idaho to make a new home. Agitation was rising against Latter Day 
Saints who had plural wives. It was felt this may ease the tension in that regard. Religion was 
very dear to this family who had given up their families, friends and homeland to join the body 
of Saints in the West. It was important to them to worship according to the desires of their hearts. 

Early in the spring of 1 884, it was decided that Susan would remain in their Smithfield 
home and keep Elizabeth, Sarah and Will with her. It was with much sadness that Susan made 
preparation and saw her family divided. In May they said goodbye and the loved ones departed. 
They had two wagons, one for personal belongings and the other for tools, seed, chickens and 
other livestock. 

Their progress was slow as they wound their way over dusty roads and through streams 
without bridges. It was necessary to stop along the way while cattle, oxen, and horses grazed. It 
was impossible to carry food for them in the wagons. The time was used to cook and wash. 

As they neared Pocatello and camped for the night, Indians stole around their camp. 
Wagons and provisions had to be watched. Sidney was friendly with the Indians and was greeted 
by the same group later each time he passed. 

One day while traveling in this area, oxen being driven by George were hot, weary of 
their heavy burden and very thirsty. They heard, smelled or sensed the fact that there was water 
near. The Snake River whose bank was high above the water level was near. Ordinarily the oxen 
were steady, and easily managed. There were no lines to govern them with but they responded 
readily to the terms "Gee or Haw" turning whichever way they indicated. Now, they disregarded 
all commands, broke into a fast run and lunged ahead with their greatest speed. They refused to 
heed George's commands or efforts to turn them. Quickly he grabbed his whip, jumped from the 
wagon, and ran along beside them whipping them with all the force he could muster in an 
attempt to turn them. The crazed animals ignored him and continued on at their greatest speed. 
George struck the final blow so near the eye that it was effective. He gained control, luckily too, 
for they wanted water badly enough to have lunged into the water, regardless of distance down to 
it. Their precious cargo would have been lost and they would have either been killed or badly 
injured. The family was most grateful and realized this was an answer to prayer. 

Another incident occurred as they traveled in this area. Sidney's brother, Samuel, slipped 
from the wagon in which he was riding. The wheels ran over his legs breaking them. Sidney was 
asked to set the bones and to administer to him. He did both. When his legs healed, it was 
impossible to tell that they had ever been broken. It was a miraculous case of healing. 

When they reached the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Indians were planting grain. They 
carried small sacks of seed, reached in, took a pinch of seed and dropped it at their feet, moved a 
step and repeated the process. Sidney stopped his team, went to where they were planting and 
said, "Let me show you." He took the seed and broadcast it by the handful as he walked. Indians 
laughed and danced about exclaiming, "Heap fast, heap fast." Sidney stayed long enough to teach 
them how to plant grain and then continued the journey. 

After nearly twelve days of travel, they reached the south bank of the Snake River near 
the present site of Lorenzo. This was the greatest challenge of their trip. The water was high and 



311 



very swift and there was no bridge. Undercurrents made it treacherous. Wagon boxes were 
chained securely to the wagons so they wouldn't be floated down stream by the swift water. 
Prince and Charlie, the most trustworthy team Sidney ever owned, were hitched to the wagon. In 
the deep water they were forced to swim while pulling their heavy load. As Sidney's and Annie's 
wagon entered the water the fearful little mother clutched a small child under each arm. It was 
such a dangerous ordeal! After reaching the other side, Prince and Charlie were unhitched and 
allowed to rest a bit and then swam back to bring other travelers and wagons. Against their 
wishes the cattle were forced to swim. It was indeed an effort to get them into the fast moving 
water. When all were safely on the north bank of the river, they traveled in a south easterly 
direction to the town site of Lyman. Mosquitoes were fierce. 

Sidney bought a two-room log cabin and lot on the town site from an old trapper. The 
family moved in, using the covered wagon as a bedroom and for storage. His first concern was to 
select suitable land for homesteading. The site selected was in the Sunnydell area. It was on the 
north bank of the Snake River. Immediately the family set to work building a house and clearing 
the sagebrush from the land. This was a hard task. The land had to be plowed and the sturdy sage 
pulled from the furrow and piled. It was allowed to dry and then burned. Sidney would rather 
plow with oxen than horses. He said he could plow a straighter furrow with them. There was 
plenty of work for everyone. Small children could carry and pile sage and do many other tasks. 
Life was a challenge. Ground had to be cultivated and planted. They made trips to the canyon for 
logs to build their home. Canals and ditches had to be made so they could have water. 

Sidney harvested grain the first year in Idaho just as he had done in Utah, by hand. The 
second year he bought a binder from Boyd Wilcox who had the dealership for them. After he 
began growing wheat he always kept a bin full on hand. Years of famine made it easy for him to 
do this. He always had grain to sell or loan. Often he did it with a promise that they would return 
it as payment. Sometimes the promise was broken and grain was not returned. 

Each fall after the work was done, Sidney made a trip to Utah taking grain to be ground 
into flour for the year. He brought flour, fruit and vegetables back with him. Susan often sent 
fruit she had dried. While in Utah, Sidney went to the canyons to get wood for the winter for 
Susan and the children and his mother. 

After Sidney moved to Idaho with part of the family, Susan covered her disappointment 
with smiles. She was a Relief Society teacher and helped the elderly and sick continually. She 
had implicit faith in the principles of the gospel. In case of illness in their home, healing was 
done through the power of God, not by doctors. She said often when she was ill, "Oh, if Sidney 
were here to administer to me, I'd be all right." Her testimony was firm in the faith at all times. 

When the first log house was built it had a dirt floor, a roof of willows and dirt. The 
willows sagged beneath their load and allowed water to drip through when it rained. Every pan 
in the house had to be used to catch the drips on beds and elsewhere. The roof had to be taken off 
and replaced with poles and more dirt to keep the rain out. At first bare logs were visible inside. 
Later when they could afford it, unbleached muslin was fastened to the logs to cover them. When 
it became soiled it was given a fresh coat of white wash made of lime and water to make it clean 
and shiny white. 

Bedsteads were made by using rectangular frames made of small poles. Ropes were laced 
back and forth to make a foundation for a straw tick. Crude indeed, but it afforded rest for weary 
bodies at the end of the day. When candles were not available, light was provided by bitches (a 
greased rag that served as a wick). Brooms were made by tying sagebrush together. Without 
screens on doors and windows mosquitoes were a menace. Mosquito bar was used to cover baby 



312 



cribs and strips were worn around the rim of men's and boy's hats. They extended to the 
shoulders for protection. 

Even though work was never done, the Sabbath Day was strictly observed. When the 
Bannock County Branch of the LDS Church was organized in Lyman, Idaho, Sidney was called 
to serve as presiding Elder. Meetings were held regularly in private homes until a small, 16 x 20 
foot log chapel was built. It had a dirt floor. Rough planks were used as seats. They were built 
around the wall and a table served as the pulpit. 

On June 5, 1885. Lyman Ward was organized, Sidney was called to serve as the Bishop. 
Elders Heber J. Grant and Wilford Woodruff of the Council of the Twelve officiated. Annie was 
chosen as the first Primary President. 

During this period of time, representatives of the Federal Government visited the area 
often seeking for men who had plural wives. People who were aware of their presence sent 
messengers to Sidney and others who were being hunted to warn them. Having been alerted, it 
was often possible for men to go into seclusion until the agents left. However, they returned 
often and unexpectedly. Finally, Sidney was accused and arrested. His trial was held October 
1877 at the District Court in Blackfoot, Idaho. 

"In order to gain your freedom will you remove your garments and denounce your 
religion?" Sidney was asked. He raised his right arm to the square and without hesitation 
answered, "You may take my right arm or leg but I'll never denounce my religion nor remove my 
garments." His sentence was pronounced. He was to spend 3 years in the Federal Prison at Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota Territory. He was then taken to the penitentiary. Others who denounced their 
religion were set free. Some of these men had held prominent positions in the Church. One of 
them was Sidney's counselor. Religion meant much more to Sidney than a passing fancy, it was 
his way of life. He taught gospel principles every opportunity he had. 

When guards at the prison found Sidney to be perfectly honest and trustworthy, he was 
allowed special privileges. He took the cows to and from the pasture, worked in the garden, ran 
errands, mixed and carried adobes for a building under construction at the prison. 

Visitors came often to see the prisoners, some out of curiosity. One lady exclaimed, "Oh, 
I thought Mormons had horns, don't they?" "We have to wait till we get older/* Sidney assured 
her. 

In Journal History of the LDS Church January 26, 1888, page 4 is an extract copied from 
a letter of Sidney Weekes to Deseret Evening News of the above date. A letter from Brother 
Sidney Weekes, now in Sioux Falls, South Dakota Territory, prison in company with several 
other Mormons for living with more than one wife states that all the brethren are in good health 
and are getting along as well as can be expected under the circumstance. The jail is well 
ventilated and kept scrupulously clean. The prison officials are kind and gentlemanly in their 
treatment of the prisoners." 

While confined in prison, having served more than fifteen months of his sentence, Sidney 
had a dream in which he was shown the date of his release. It was made so certain to him that he 
told guards and companions about it. "You're crazy," they assured him, "Your time isn't half up." 
"Wait and see," he answered. The day arrived, also the mail, but no pardon for Sidney. He was 
harassed, still he trusted. In the early evening by Special Delivery his pardon arrived bearing the 
seal and signature of the US President, Grover Cleveland. His joy knew no bounds! He returned 
to Utah with a heavy heart. Susan, his beloved wife, had passed away May 1, 1888. and also his 
heroic mother on October 26, 1888. Both had been laid to rest in the Smithfield Cemetery in his 
absence. 



313 



He visited briefly with his family and friends in Utah, then rode a horse bareback with 
only a quilt to ride and sleep on to Idaho. He was welcomed by Annie, a baby son Albert, born 
January 24, 1888 and other members of his family. Other children born in Idaho were: Charles 
Joseph, July 1, 1885-he passed away the same day-Emily, May 29,1886; Mabel February 21, 
1890; Frank, October 16,1891; Lavon, October 1, 1893; LeRoy, July 23, 1895; Cyril, September 
29, 1896; Florence and Ethel, twins, born July 10, 1898; and Clarence, May 27,1901. 

Sidney began work again. A floor had to be put in the house on the homestead, another 
room added, as well as a room under the kitchen floor to provide storage for fruits and 
vegetables. There was additional ground to break, fences, corrals and sheds to be built and there 
was always canal and ditch work to be done. 

Then tragedy struck. An epidemic of diphtheria passed through the area. School was 
dismissed for more than a month. Several of the family were afflicted and suffered much. 
Eunice, age 16, Lucinda, age 14 and Emily, age 10 all passed away. Leo was a baby and he 
suffered permanent damage. 

Sidney took pneumonia and passed away rather suddenly April 14, 1909, at his home in 
Sunnydell. George Briggs, Jr. who had served as a counselor to Sidney in the Bishopric - later as 
his Bishop, spoke at the funeral service. He said, "Sidney was dependable and diligent. He was 
industrious, giving freely of his time to those in need. Having passed through famine, he 
practiced the axiom, "Waste not, want not". He had the best tithing record in the ward. 

His was a stalwart example for us, his descendants, to pattern our lives after. To us comes 
an obligation to follow in his footsteps. May we ever cherish, revere and honor his name. His 
posterity at this writing are numerous and increasing. 

Written by Opal Clements Weeks a granddaughter 
Typed by I donna Murray 



This incident happened around the time that Sidney and Susan Elizabeth Weekes were 
building their new home in Smithfield, Utah. One day Sidney must have been feeling especially 
blessed. It is said that he picked Susan Elizabeth, his wife, up in his arms with their small 
children perched on her lap, and walked across the road to his sister's house to show her his 
treasures. 

This story was told to Joyce Brindle Larsen by her mother Alta Weekes Brindle, a 
granddaughter of Sidney Weekes. 



314 



SUSAN ELIZABETH PILGRIM WEEKES 

Susan Elizabeth was the tenth and last child of Samuel and Betsy Elizabeth Coote 
Pilgrim. She was born 10 September 1835 in the parish of St. Giles, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, 
England. 

Her father, Samuel Pilgrim, was employed by the owner of a chalk farm. His health was 
poor and he passed away at the age of thirty nine years, sometime during the year 1836. (The 
year is all that is recorded.) He left his wife with the following children: Joseph, the oldest, age 
eighteen years, born 23 March 1818; Mary Ann Maria, born 18 June 1822; Rebecca, born 1 
January 1826; John, born 1 August 1828; Swan, born 21 January 1830; Thomas, born 22 October 
1832; Susan Elizabeth, the baby, born 10 September 1835. 

Three children had passed away. Elizabeth, born 12 March 1824; she died at the age of 
three years in 1827. Another daughter, Elizabeth, born 18 October 1833, who died eight months 
later on 1 5 June 1 834, seventeen days later on 2 July 1 834 a fourteen year old brother, George 
Frederick passed away. Likely these two deaths were due to a communicable disease, since they 
were so close together. 

With the loss of three children and then her young husband, Betsy must have been 
heartbroken. The task of guidance and providing for her family of seven children was a 
tremendous challenge. Susan, the youngest, a baby about a year old, was allowed to spend some 
time with her Aunt Susan Miller, her mother's sister, who lived in the country. As she grew up 
she received fine training from her mother and Aunt Susan. She learned to be very neat and 
precise in any work she did. 

One of Betsy's friends was instrumental in helping her find work as a laundress, which 
was work the children could help with. Clothes had to be scrubbed on the washboard and ironed 
with flat irons, which were heated on the stove. 

During Susan's youth her mother gave her a copy of The Book of Mormon. Through 
reading it and the message of the Elders from the Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints, 
who labored in Cambridge about 1850, Susan gained a firm testimony of the divinity of the Book 
of Mormon and the principles of the Church. She was baptized a member of the L D S Church on 
29 March 1851, when she was fifteen years old. An older brother, Thomas, had been baptized 
two days previous. A sister, Rebecca, ten years older, was baptized the next spring in June of 
1852. Each was very desirous of coming to America, which seemed too much for their mother to 
bear. Having lost her husband and three children in death and then to see three others torn from 
her by a new religion, which would take them so far from her, seemed more than she could 
endure. Betsy became very bitter. 

The children were scorned and persecuted by their family and friends. Each, however, 
was determined to emigrate to America to join the body of Saints, not one of the three was 
swayed by persecution. Thomas left his homeland 1 January 1852, a little less than a year after 
his baptism. A member of the Perpetual Emigration Company, he sailed on the Ship Ellen Maria. 
He was listed as a tinner by trade. Isaac Haight was appointed as company leader and there were 
369 persons on board. New Orleans was the Port of Entry into the United States. From there 
Thomas came to Smithfield and made his home in Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah. 

Susan's older sister, Rebecca, became an outcast in her mother's home so stayed and 
worked elsewhere. Full of faith and fearless, she made plans to come to America. When she 
returned home to bid the family goodbye, she was denied entrance. Her Mother, very upset and 
sad, threw her feather tick and other belongings and a few small coins out the window saying, 
"Never spend this until you or your children are crying for bread." 



315 



Susan had a strong desire to leave with Rebecca, but love and sympathy for her mother 
prompted her to promise that she would stay and take care of her as long as she lived. She kept 
her promise. About five and a half years later, her mother, Betsy Coote Pilgrim, passed away on 
30 November 1862. Susan had saved money she'd earned in the laundry so she'd have money for 
her trip to America. She made preparations to join Rebecca and Thomas in America. Two of her 
girl friends had planned to accompany her, but hadn't saved sufficient money to pay traveling 
expenses. Susan loaned them the needed money, which they promised to return when they could 
earn it in America. Work was hard to find and Susan was never reimbursed, but this did not 
affect their friendship. 

Final goodbyes were said to friends and relatives. Susan set sail on the splendid packet 
(mail and passenger) ship, Amazon, 4 June 1863 in company with 895 persons; 800 of these were 
Latter Day Saint emigrants under the care of William Bramall, with Elders Sloan and Palmer as 
counselors. New York was to be their Port of Entry. The day before they sailed, government 
officers eulogized the order and general appearance of their company. Then Brother George Q. 
Cannon and other of the English Mission organized the company and gave instructions for the 
safe procedure of their journey across the ocean. The Amazon was the last ship of that season, 
1863. 

A brass band from South Wales, who were converts to the Church on their way to Zion, 
played sweet music on the stern of the ship, which gave a festive air to their departure from their 
native land. However, they soon had cause for alarm. As they were sailing out on the River 
Thames, a wind came up and continued until they were forced to drop anchor in the shelter of the 
Isle of Wight on the 7th. Then on the evening of the 9th they took up the anchor and slipped 
around the comer of the island and journeyed on their way. The breeze gained more strength and 
veered around until again it was blowing in their face, which increased the difficulty of clearing 
the channel. For days the ship was at the mercy of strong winds. Some days they traveled ten or 
twelve knots an hour, and at other times it lay there like some monster sunning itself in the sun. 

In the day time the Saints enjoyed themselves on the Spar Deck of the ship. Many of 
them could be seen at work: tailors, seamstresses, and straw plaiters, and needlework of many 
kinds were being done by the passengers to pass away the time as they traveled. But in the 
evening the sweet sounds of music and songs of thanksgiving and praise were drowned out by 
the winds which whistled through the corsage of the sails, and the sea raged and boiled as far as 
the eye could see. But, in spite of this, they were usually blessed. They had no accidents of any 
kind, and they reached Castle Gardens, New York, on the 19th of July, with joy and 
thanksgiving, for hadn't they seen the controlling power and care of a wise, kind Heavenly Father 
manifested in their behalf during their ocean voyage? (Read chapter 20 of "Uncommercial 
Traveler", by Charles Dickens for more information.) 

After this, the last company of the season from the British Isles reached New York, they 
were sent to Nebraska, by train, from there they were fitted out for the trip in wagon trains. They 
arrived in Salt Lake City during the last of September or the first of October. 

After a short stay in Salt Lake City, Susan went to Lehi, Utah, where her sister, Rebecca, 
was located in a home of her own. The two sisters had a joyous reunion. They had been parted 
for about five or six years, and were so happy to see each other again. 

After a short time their brother Thomas came from Smithfield, Utah and visited with his 
sisters, and when he went home he took Susan with him to keep house for him. He was still a 
single man and Susan needed a home, so it was a nice arrangement for both of them. In a short 
time both Susan and Thomas found mates there in Smithfield. Thomas and Annie Peacock; 
Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim and Sidney Weekes were married on the same day, 16 July, 1864. 



316 



Sidney and Susan had much in common, both were emigrants from England, and made 
good pioneers. They built a four room, two story house where their last three children were born. 
They loved flowers and had them in and out of the house. There was a good orchard and 
vegetable garden west of the house where there was a wealth of fruits and vegetables for the 
family's use. 

Susan loved needle-work and did much sewing, knitting and weaving to make her family 
comfortable. She especially loved eyelet work and had her babies dresses decorated with it. "My 
mother fell heir to some of the baby dresses and I was blessed in one of them. It had nine inches 
of cut-work embroidery on the border of the long skirt." (Beatrice Munns Hansen) 

This was a religious family where the children were brought up to be prayerful, observe 
the Sabbath Day and attend their church meetings. The children were not allowed to do much 
talking while at the meal table and when they had finished a meal, were to ask to be excused. 
The English children were to be seen and not heard much while at the table or when company 
was present 

Sidney and Susan had a happy home and their first two children were born in a small log 
house. By the time of the arrival of their third child, Rebecca, a four room, two-story home had 
been erected for their comfort. Grandfather carried on his farm work as well as carrying the 
adobes and mortar up the scaffold to the mason during the early morning and evening hours. 

This was a home where the principles of the Restored Gospel were obeyed. A strict 
tithing was paid on what they raised. Very little money was available during those days, so it was 
paid in wheat and crops that were raised, as well as in livestock 

Susan loved flowers and the windows were built with plenty of room for house plants. 
Her flowers were: begonias, fuchsias, geraniums and wandering Jews. She could also knit and 
crochet. She also did spinning and weaving and made the clothes for her family. She seemed to 
have had some very busy fingers to do all the things that women had to do in those days of long 
ago. 

Six children were born to Sidney and Susan, three boys and three girls, who were as 
follows: Elizabeth Susan, George Sidney, Rebecca Jane, Sarah Ann, John Samuel, and William 
Henry. This family was truly an English family. They were taught to waste no morsel of food, to 
be mindful of their neighbors and others in time of need. 

Sidney was handy with the sick people of the ward, active in his Priesthood work and a 
kind and understanding husband. He could play an accordion and at times he was an all around 
clown with his children. When they were small in the home in the evenings and on rainy days 
when he could not be outside, he delighted in playing with them; by this means the neighbor 
children were attracted to the Weekes home. 

Susan was not as strong as her sister, Rebecca, and never could have endured the long 
trek by hand-cart to Salt Lake City. Her hair was long and very thick. Someone told her that if 
she would have it thinned it may increase her strength, which she did, but it seemed to make no 
difference. She was a little taller than average and was rather slender. Her eyes were brown and 
she disliked anyone to tell her that they were black. 

Before Susan and Sidney were married she asked him if he believed in polygamy. He 
answered that he hadn't given it much thought. And it has been said that she said, "If it is one of 
the principles of the Gospel, it is just as important as any of the rest of them. I have left my 
native land and relatives and friends for the sake of the Gospel, and I want to live for all there is 
in it" 

It was not until many years later that the subject came up again. Her sixth child was about 
three years old, when one of the neighbors was accidentally killed while hauling a load of 
willows. His wife was left with two little girls and grandfather desired that he should have 
another wife. She was a small woman and about twenty-two years younger than my 



317 



Grandmother, Susan. She was Annie Bennett Harris and Susan accompanied them to the 
Endowment House in Salt Lake City where they were married for time only. The two wives 
lived in the same house until three children were born to the second wife. 

Grandfather saw that his family was getting larger and needed more land for farming. It 
was also difficult to keep out of the way of the U.S. Marshals, who were always searching for 
men with more than one wife. 

Land was being opened up for homesteading in Idaho. Early in the spring of 1 884 it was 
decided that Susan would remain in the Smithfield home keeping with her Elizabeth, Sarah Ann, 
and William, her youngest son. Sidney would take his sons George and John and their daughter 
Rebecca, his second wife and three little children by his second wife to Idaho to establish a new 
home in Idaho. 

It was with much sadness that Susan made preparations for their leaving and then saw her 
family divided. In May good-byes were said and loved ones parted. Sidney, Annie and small 
children, their personal belongings, bedding, food and other items were packed in the covered 
wagon. George drove the other one which held a plow, harrow, tools of various kinds, seeds, 
crates of chickens and all else they could find room for. Livestock were driven behind. When 
they'd gone a little distance Sidney noticed that John was bareheaded. "Where is your hat, son?" 
he asked. "I forgot it," came the prompt answer. "We'll wait while you run back and get it," his 
father said. When John (my father) reached home he found his mother crying as if her heart 
would break, a mental picture he never forgot. 

Grandmother was not very well and desired to remain in the Utah home with her two 
oldest girls and her little son. Poor Grandmother must have been quite depressed to have her 
children leave her and go to the untamed country to make a new home. She was a woman with a 
strong testimony of the Gospel, and was very kind and generous. She, no doubt, spent many 
lonely years following the departure of her husband and his other wife. I just wonder whether she 
didn't think she was too generous with her husband. However, she made the best of the situation 
and filled her life with activity and the care of her home and children there with her. One of the 
girls went to work in the homes of others to support the Utah home. 

Life in Idaho for her husband and others was a never-ending struggle. Houses were to be 
built for the family and livestock. The land had to be cleared of sage-brush, the ground had to be 
leveled so it could be irrigated, canals had to be made for the water to reach the thirsty soil. The 
men worked early and late to make a success of their new home in Idaho, while Rebecca helped 
the second wife with her housework and little children. 

In the year of 1 884, on June 5th, Grandfather Sidney Weekes, became the first bishop of 
the Lyman Ward in the Snake River Valley, which had just been organized. 

In the fall of each year grandfather made a trip to the Utah home to see that his first wife 
and children were well supplied with wood and food for the long winter months. His mother 
lived next door to his first wife and was also happy to have a visit from her son, Sidney. During 
one of these visits he asked if he could take a pet dog from the Utah home, so it could be of use 
in Idaho. He took the dog with him to Idaho, but after a few days it turned up missing. Later it 
had found its way back to its home in Utah. After this event the dog received an unusual amount 
of devotion and loving care. 

Finally grandfather was arrested by the United States Marshall's, and later sentenced to 
serve three years in the Federal Prison in Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, for the practice of 
polygamy on December 1, 1887. During his confinement his two oldest sons, George and John, 
and his daughter, Rebecca, helped his second wife with the management and care of the home 
and farm in Idaho. 



318 



Sidney was assigned as one of the gardeners while serving his sentence. He raised 
cabbages and tomatoes and it was while he was there that he learned to like tomatoes. He was 
friendly with the prison guard and during his stay at the prison, Sidney converted him to 
Mormonism. 

Two other men from Idaho were in the same prison for the same offense and they were 
all released after only half of the sentence was served Grandfather had a dream that his pardon 
would arrive on a certain date and told his inmates of the dream. The day arrived but the pardon 
did not arrive with the daily mail, but late in the evening it was delivered to them. 

Susan's health was not good for several years before Sidney's imprisonment; it began to 
fail rapidly in April of 1888, and she died May 1, 1888. Her children in Idaho, George and John 
and Sarah were notified of her passing, but with the transportation available in those days, they 
were not able to get to Smithfield before her burial. After preparations were made for their trip, 
they went by wagon to Idaho Falls (then known as Eagle Rock), then by freight train, which 
sometimes would be stopped for hours before it moved south. Their mother was buried the day 
before the three children arrived at the Utah home in Smithfield. Sidney was released from 
prison 1 January, 1 889 and came home to Smithfield with a heavy heart having missed seeing 
both his beloved wife and mother. Such were the trials and sorrows of the early pioneers in the 
west while toiling to make the desert blossom as the rose. 

Grandmother Susan was laid to rest in the extreme south end of the Smithfield cemetery 
early in the month of May. About six weeks later, 26 Oct. 1 888, her mother-in-law, Mary Ann 
Bauldry Weekes, who was her next door neighbor in life, passed away. She was laid to rest 
beside Susan. 

They were indeed both heroic women, valiant in the cause of truth and right. Each 
remained true to the principles of the gospel as long as she lived, regardless of her 
disappointments, hardships and trials. 

Neighbors and friends of Susan's loved and respected her for her interest in their behalf. 
She always tried to make the best of the situation by doing what was best for those she loved. 

Following is the obituary for Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim Weekes as copied from the Deseret 
News 16 May 1888. Weekes - at Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, May I, 1888. Susan Elizabeth 
Pilgrim Weekes, born at Cambridge, England, 10 September 1835. She was baptized 1 March 
1851, emigrated from Cambridge 4 June 1863, arriving in Smithfield in the fall of the same year, 
where she married Sidney Weekes, who is now serving out a term of imprisonment for unlawful 
cohabitation, in Sioux Falls, Dakota. She died in full faith of the gospel and leaves a husband and 
six children to mourn her loss. 

As stated in the obituary, her husband and six children survived. They were: Susan 
Elizabeth - married to Newton Woodruff, born 10 November 1865, died 8 September 1937; 
George Sidney, born 18 September 1867, married to Mary Ann Briggs, died 9 August 1940; 
Rebecca Jane, born 29 September 1869, married (I) Chris Jensen, (2) Thomas Terry, died 14 
September 1942; Sarah Ann, born 29 August 1871, married to Henry Alvin Munns, died 1 1 May 
1941; John Samuel, born 8 September 1873, married to Ida Isabel Grover, died 22 April 1956; 
William Henry, born 8 September 1875, unmarried, died 15 March 1900. 

Written by Opal Weekes Clements 

Sources of Information: 

Records of Phebe Woodruff Johnson 

Records of Beatrice Jane Munns Hathcock Hansen Records of Opal Weekes Clements 

Essentials of Church History by Joseph Fielding Smith 

Church Chronology by Andrew Jensen, p. 1 1 5 



319 



SIDNEY WEEKES PRISON TIME FOR PLURAL MARRIAGE 

An account of time served in the Penitentiary at Sioux Falls Dakota Territory (South 
Dakota), by Sidney Weekes, for having plural wives. 

Sidney Weekes was born in Welling Kent, England on March 8,1841. In 1853, he left 
England with his parents, on the ship International, arriving in New Orleans in April. From there 
they went to Keokuk, Iowa. In May they left for Utah, moving slowly with ox teams and 
wagons. 

While crossing the Platte River, Sidney's brother Benjamin was drowned. He was 
eighteen years old at the time. As they neared Fort Laramie, his father Robert passed away. The 
widowed mother Mary Ann and her children continued the journey, settling in Smithfield, Cache 
County, Utah. There Sidney met Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim, who had also immigrated from 
England. He loved her for the ideals she cherished. On July 16, 1864 they drove an ox team to 
Salt Lake City to be married in the Endowment House. They made their home in Smithfield. 
Three sons, George, John and William and three daughters, Elizabeth, Rebecca and Sarah 
blessed their home. It was one in which love, devotion, and consideration were paramount. Their 
children were taught to be thrifty and energetic. Each had a testimony of the Gospel planted deep 
in their heart, just as their parents had. 

Sidney worked hard and soon after his marriage had a new five room adobe house built 
for his family. One day as they conversed, Sidney said to Susan, "how do you feel about plural 
marriage?" "If one principle of our religion is true, Sidney, they're all of divine origin", she 
answered. They spoke further on the subject. After due consideration it was decided that Sidney 
should marry a second wife. His choice was Annie Bennett Harris, a young widow who lived 
near them. Her husband had been accidentally killed while hauling a load of wood from the 
canyon. She had two little girls Martha and Beatrice. 

Arrangements were completed and Susan accompanied them to Salt Lake City where 
they were married on Oct. 4, 1878. Upon their return home, Annie was given two rooms in 
Sidney and Susan's home. 

Due to the oppressive treatment of men who had plural wives, it seemed wise for Sidney 
to move to Idaho and there make a new home for his second wife. It was also his desire to have 
homes for his sons, as they grew older, so they could stay close to the body of the Church. Susan 
chose to stay in her home in Smithfield, since she was older and her health was not good. 
However, Susan assisted with the plans for the move to Idaho in the spring of 1884. Sidney, 
along with his sons 16 year old George and 10 year old John, his fourteen year old daughter, 
Rebecca, his second wife Annie Bennett Harris and her daughter Martha Harris, along with 
Sidney and Annie's three young daughters, Eunice, Lucinda and Jane, all left Smithfield, Utah, 
and headed for Lyman, Idaho. (Annie's first husband had been killed in a logging accident and 
their daughter Beatrice had also passed away.) It was a slow, tedious journey with wagon and ox 
teams and cattle trailing. After their arrival there were numerous challenges; a home to be built, 
ground to be cleared of sage, ditches, canals and roads to be made. Life would have been 
difficult without interference from the government agents who checked constantly on men who 
had plural wives. Members of the above mentioned families had to be constantly on guard for 
their safety. It was necessary for Sidney, as well as others who had more than one wife, to have 
secret places of abode where they could elude the officers. Life went on under these trying 
conditions for four years, until Sidney was arrested on December 25, 1887. His trial was held at 
Blackfoot, Idaho, the county seat of Bannock County. At that time, government officials told 



320 



him that if he would denounce his religion he could have his freedom. He staunchly refused to do 
so saying he'd rather lose his right arm or leg. Therefore, the sentence was pronounced. He was 
to serve three years in the Federal Penitentiary at Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory. Soon after his 
arrival, guards and officers learned of Sidney's splendid traits of character. He was trustworthy, 
honest, ambitious and obedient. Therefore, he was granted special privileges; allowed to run 
errands, work in the garden, mix and carry adobes for the new building being erected and take 
the cows to and from the pasture. 

Visitors came often to the penitentiary, out of curiosity, to see a Mormon. One woman 
exclaimed, "Oh, I thought Mormons had horns, don't they?" "We have to wait until we grow 
older," Sidney calmly assured her, "Here we are, judge for yourself. ,, 

While detained there, Sidney explained and taught the gospel at every available 
opportunity. He converted and baptized the warden, Mr. Moulton and his daughter. 

An extract from the Deseret Evening News of January 26, 1888 is found in Journal 
History of the L.D.S. Church, page 4. It reads as follows: "Sioux City, a letter from Brother 
Sidney Weekes, now in Sioux (Iowa), prison, in company with several other Mormons, for living 
with more than one wife, states that all the brethren there are in good health and are getting along 
as well as can be expected under the circumstances. The jail is well ventilated and is kept 
scrupulously clean. The prison officers are kind and gentlemanly in the treatment of the 
prisoners/"' 

When his term was nearly half served, Sidney was shown in a dream the date his pardon 
would be granted (7 Jan. 1889). He told the guard and his companions of the experience. "You're 
crazy, your time is only half up," they chided. "Wait and see," he answered. January 7 arrived 
and the mailman failed to bring his pardon. He was harassed by his companions, but felt certain 
it would arrive before the day ended. In the evening, by special delivery, his pardon came, signed 
by Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, in Washington, D.C. His joy knew no 
bounds. However, he returned to his loved ones with a heavy heart, for during his absence, 
Susan, his first wife and Mary Ann, his mother, had both passed away. 

He visited with his children in Smithfield, then rode a horse bareback to Lyman, Idaho, 
to be with Annie and his children. He resumed his duties without further interference from the 
Government Agents. 

He remained true to the ideals and standards of his Church as long as he lived. His faith 
in its principles never wavered. He served as Superintendent of the Sunday School in both Utah 
and Idaho; as Presiding Elder and the first Bishop of the Lyman Ward. 

He enjoyed and did Temple work. During the terrible epidemic of Diphtheria and 
whenever needed in times of illness, he gave fully of his time and service. 

On 18 April 1909, he passed away at Sunnydell. His death came due to pneumonia. 

Compiled by Opal Weekes Clements 



321 




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Sidney Weekes in the Sioux Falls. Dakota Territory (So. Dakota) 
Jail for Polygamy. Sidney - 2 nd from left, back row 



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id w u i mmm i tito<.minr ,. 



of.. 



** 







Sister Susan E. Weeks 

2£ WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE HAY 1, 1888, 



• 



By Mothers dying bedside 
Two weeping sisters stood. 
In tenderness each other Hasp; 
In sorrow bowed their head. 

Father in prison, Mother dead 
Too hard, too hard it seemed . 
Brothers and sisters absent, too. 
That for the dear one mourned. 

Long had she suffered, toiled and borii 
In the Gospel's glorious cause: 
Without a murmur or complaint 
She obeyed God's holy laws. 

They saw in the glorious distance 
A crown of gems divine. 
Placed upon their Mother's brow, 
And murmured, "Thy will not mine." 



iiffidftilfrifVlttitt'fiV 
%jFSFW%9W* W IP w 










323 



WILLIAM HENRY WEEKES 

William Henry Weekes was born 8 September 1875 at Smithfield, Cache, Utah. He 
was the youngest child of six children born to Sidney and Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim 
Weekes. His education was received at Smithfield and Logan, Utah. 

William was about seven years when his father moved to Idaho. He remained with 
his mother in Utah. He spent very little time with his father. His mother died when he 
was thirteen years old, and he lived with sisters in Smithfield while attending school, 
including a couple of years at the academy in Logan, Utah. He had planned to become an 
architect and was majoring in that field. His tool chest may be seen at the home of a 
niece, Esther May Weekes Boulder, of Archer, Idaho. 

Will came to Archer and stayed with his brothers, George and John while they were 
batching previous to their marriages. Then when John and Ida were married, Will stayed 
with them off and on while he was in Idaho. During the winter months he worked with 
his brother John getting wood for the family. 

Will was engaged to a girl in Midvale, Utah. He had procured some pigs to fatten 
and sell, then went to Green River, Wyoming to work on the railroad to earn money in 
preparation for his wedding. His brother, John tended the pigs while he was away. 

While at Green River he became very ill with pneumonia. A telegram was sent to 
his father, Sidney, to inform him of Will's illness. His father went to him at once. 
However Will died soon after his father's arrival. His body was brought back to Archer 
and buried there. He died 15 March, 1900. 

Dictated to Maude W. Jeppson by John S. Weekes, Will's brother. 





Left: William Henry Weekes 
standing by John Samuel 
Weekes, his brother 
Above: William Henry Weekes 



324 




SZDA/sY t /lA/A/r£ h'BE/c^s SBtt/^D X* AfetiFR. /883 



325 




George Sidney Weekes & Mary Ann Briggs Family 
Back: Ester May, Lelen. Elmer, Charles, Susan 
Front: Earnest, Mary Ann, George holding Chester, Susan's son 



326 



GEORGE SIDNEY WEEKES 

To a worthy couple, Robert Weekes and Ann Mary Bauldry, on March 8, 1841, was born 
a son, to whom they gave the name of Sidney. He, with his brothers and sisters, lived much the 
same as any other English child. 

They were quite satisfied with their lot until they heard our restored gospel when it was 
first preached in England. They readily believed and accepted it. As the Elders stressed to gather 
together in Zion to miss the calamities that would befall the world, they, along with so many 
others, had that desire strong enough to put it into action. They completed the necessary business 
in England and boarded the ship. International, in February, 1853. They were two months on the 
voyage and they arrived at New Orleans some time in April of the same year. They traveled up 
the Mississippi and joined the saints; then made their journey across the plains. 

Sidney was a fast growing youth; he was called upon to drive an ox team. For some 
reason his brother, Samuel, didn't come with them when they joined the Saints and crossed the 
plains. Thus, Sidney had to lead out, as his Father's health wasn't so good. It proved to be a long, 
hard, and difficult journey and too much for his father; for he passed away out on the plains. The 
rest were able to undergo the hardships and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley with the other Saints. 

In due time they settled in Smithfield, Utah, and Sidney was called upon to go back with 
some other men who were making the journey to get his brother Samuel. His mother feared to let 
him go. She couldn't stand the thoughts of parting with him. She needed him so badly but what 
cannot be helped will have to be endured. Thus, she helped him prepare for the trip, wondering if 
she would ever see him again. She had dressed him in a pair of homespun trousers, kissed him 
goodbye with tears in her eyes and a prayer in her heart and he was off. 

She was a noble, brave-hearted, courageous woman and thus she bore the burdens that 
were her lot to bear and carried on in making a home and surviving the wild west. 

When ample time had been given, Sidney arrived with his brother, Samuel, the oxen and 
their full possessions. When his mother ran out to greet them she beheld Sidney in the homespun 
trousers that she had sent him away in. The trousers were halfway up to his knees and one patch 
upon another until she could hardly see the trousers for the patches. He was so weary, worn and 
bedraggled she laughed and cried together as she hugged him close to her heart. They were so 
happy to be together again and to have Samuel and the others with them. 

In the usual way, Sidney met Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim. She didn't come with the first 
immigrants from England as her sister, Rebecca had done. She had promised her aged mother 
that she wouldn't leave her as long as she lived. After her death, Susan hastily made the 
necessary arrangements and came to Utah. She was a good seamstress and did lovely 
needlework, making lace and cut embroidery work in her spare moments when she wasn't busily 
employed in the laundry. Her father worked in the factories. 

Sidney and Susan were married in 1864, just eleven years after Sidney's arrival in Utah. 
They made their home in Smithfield, in a two-story adobe structure sitting on the east of a lovely 
orchard. As the other children were married his mother spent the rest of her days with him. 

In this home, six children came to bless their lives. They were: Lizzie, George, Rebecca, 
Sarah Ann, John and William. They were all reared in the principles of the Gospel. Sidney and 
Susan's strong points were; honesty, virtue, thrift, keeping the Sabbath, and living the word of 
wisdom. In fact, they tried to keep all the commandments. Many stories could be told to show 
their strength along those lines as they lived and sacrificed for their religion. 



327 



George, being the oldest boy, had much responsibility during his early child-hood days 
spent, on the small farm in Smithfield. They would glean the grain from the edges of the fields 
and ditches by hand and thrash it with a frail. Then it had to be ground in a small hand mill for 
cereal and flour. 

They killed wild animals for meat and made their soap from the fat of the animals. Susan 
was an excellent cook and made the most of the things they had. She would steam and roll the 
straw from the grain and braid it into hats for the men and boys and bonnets for herself and the 
girls. Their means were very meager and at times there was scarcely enough food and clothing to 
go around. 

For amusement, they enjoyed dancing and playing games such as Guinea Pig. A short 
stick was sharpened at both ends and placed on the ground. They struck it with another stick, 
flipping it toward squares with numbers in them giving them their score. George liked roping 
calves and swimming. He became an excellent swimmer. 

Often after the day's work on the farm, George and his father would go to the canyon 
above Smithfield and Logan to cut and haul timber, working until the wee hours of the morning. 

In 1 884, George and his brother John came to Idaho with their father and his second wife, 
Annie Bennett Harris, and their four children. George worked very hard clearing sagebrush, 
making ditches and building a home for the family in what is now called Archer. He made 
several trips to Utah to help his mother, sisters and younger brother. 

When the law interceded in polygamy his father was imprisoned. During this time his 
mother became ill and died. George then brought his sister Sarah Ann up to Idaho to help Annie 
during the confinement. 

When his father was released from prison, he left his father's farm. He married Mary Ann 
Briggs on November 27, 1891. Their first home was a two-room log building now occupied by 
Mrs. James Briggs in Archer, Idaho. 

Mary Ann was born at Tupton, Debyshire, England on November 10, 1870. She was a 
daughter of Charles Briggs and Mary Ann Worrell. Her parents were pioneers in this valley in 
1883. 

To George and Mary Ann, were born five boys and two girls: George Lelan, born 
December 3, 1892, Susan Elizabeth born August 26, 1894, Charles born November 15, 1896, 
Elmer born January 30, 1898, Esther May born February 19, 1901, Earnest Sidney born October 
10, 1903. Joseph was born April 7, 1906 and died October 19, 1906. 

He gave much effort and service to teach his family the principles of the gospel. He 
admonished them to follow the scriptures. "Seek ye first the kingdom of God and His 
righteousness and all else shall be added." 

After the birth of their first child, George Lelan, they moved a mile and a quarter east 
and homesteaded. Once again, they cleared sagebrush, dug ditches and built fences. They broke 
ground, and built a home. We enjoy the fruits of all of their hard work still today. 

George was a stalwart, hard worker, and clean of habits. He was never known to use 
slang words or to swear. He exhibited his faith in healing by administering to many when he was 
called to the homes of the sick. He always gave thanks to his Heavenly Father for these 
blessings. He had much devotion to his family and would have given his life to exemplify the 
gospel. 

George's fearlessness of water and his ability to swim was put to use for the benefit of 
many. A young boy, and only son, Otto Olsen fell into the Snake River. He spent three days and 
nights almost continually diving and dragging the river until at last he recovered the body of the 



328 



boy from the deep bed of the violent stream. There were no bridges on the river, just a ferry at 
Market Lake, now called Roberts. One time his two brothers-in-law, Luke and George Briggs, 
lost control of their team as they were trying to cross the river. George, being the only one that 
could swim, stayed with the team and wagon until they drug him down into a deep eddy. He 
managed to loosen the horses from the wagon, but had to leave them and swim to shore to save 
his own life. The team drowned, but with help, he saved the wagon and pulled it to shore with 
ropes and chains. 

On one of his trips from Smithfield to Idaho, as they were passing through Blackfoot, 
Idaho, on the way to Archer, the cattle and horses were very hot and tired from the hot sand. 
They tried desperately to turn and run into the river to be cooled and get relief from the sun and 
sand. He managed to turn them and keep them from the river, which was very deep and 
treacherous at that point, thus saving the lives of those that rode with him. 

In 1915, George was called to fulfill a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter 
Day Saints. He filled a very successful mission in the Southern States Mission. His wife and 
boys carried on nobly and cared for the farm during his absence. Later, two of his boys fulfilled 
honorable missions for the church. 

His family was a credit to his name and the noble teachings that he gave to them. He was 
well versed in the principles of the gospel. He had faith in God, the Priesthood and temple work 
for his kindred dead, for his family, and his fellow men. He died at his home in Archer, Idaho. 
He was a kind and loving father, a good neighbor, and held the deep respect of all who knew 
him. He lived to the age of 75 years and 1 1 months. He truly was a great pioneer. 

We pay tribute to him for the good life that he was so willing to live for righteousness. 
He is survived by twenty-five grandchildren and fifty-two great grandchildren. 

George Sidney Weekes was born September 8, 1 867 at Smithfield, Cache County, Utah. 
He was baptized on August 3, 1876. He received his endowment and was married to Mary Ann 
Briggs on November 27, 1891. George Sidney Weekes died August 9, 1940 in Archer, Idaho. 

We wish to dedicate this verse of hymn to his life: 

The teachers work is done, 

Come lay his books and papers down. 

He shall not need them more. 

His ink shall dry upon his pen 

So softly close the door. 

His tired head with locks of white 

And like the winter sun 

Has laid to peaceful rest tonight, 

The teachers work is done. 

Compiled by Elmer and Martha Weekes 



329 



330 



Marshall Hubbard 
Grover 



& 



Isabelle Orr 



Family 



6&7 



331 



332 



Family Group Record- 545 



Pagel of 2 





Husband Marshall Hubbard GROVER-1505 










Bom 27 Sep 1846 I Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




t Chr j Place 


Baptized 


15 Jul 1865 




Died 8 Feb 1918 j Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


Endowed 


11 Dec 1871 j EHOUS 




Buried 12 Feb 1918 Place Sutton Cemetery, Madison. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC | 




Mamed 11 Dec 1871 Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


11 Dec 1871 I EHOUS 




Husbands father Thomas GROVER-5489 




MRIN: 2635 




Husband-smother Caroline Eliza NICKERSON-5915 








Wife 






Bom 18 May 1852 I Place Glasgow, Ayrshire, Scotland 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




,Chr. j Place 


Baptized 


1861_| 




Died 25 Oct 1919 Place Archer, Madison. Idaho 


Endowed 


11 Dec 1871 I EHOUS 




Buried Oct 1919 I Place Sutton Cemetery, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


13 May 1927 1 LOGAN~1 




wife's father Thomas ORR-1 363 




MRIN. 546 




wrfes mother Christina BENNETT-1 364 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


M 


Marshall Thomas GROVER-7314 






Bom 14 Dec 1872 


Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






wed 21 Auq 1873 


Place Grantsville, Tooele. Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 




Spouse 




Married ! Place 


SeaISp 


i 


2 


_F 


Ida Isabel or Isabelle GROVE R-1 349 




^j 


^om 13 Apr 1874 


Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 


Baptized 


29 Jul 1882 






^ 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Oct 1896 


LOGAN 




Died 15Jun1942 


Place Sunnydell, Madison, ID 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 18Jun1942 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison. Idaho 




spouse John Samuel WEEKES-25 




MRIN. 2 






Married 20 Nov 1894 I Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


SeaISp 


21 Oct 1896] LOGAN 


3 


M 


Robert Edgar GROVER-1350 






Bom 5 Apr 1876 j Place Grantsville. Tooele, Utah 


Baptized 


3 May 1885 { 




Chr J Place 


Endowed 


10 Mar 1942 SLAKE 


| 


Dfed 22 Nov 1938 j Place Archer. Madison. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried ! Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison, Idaho 






spouse Martha Elizabeth HARRIS-1463 




MRIN: 548 




Mamed 21 Jan 1901 I Place St Anthony. Fremont. Idaho 


SeaISp 


10 Mar 1942 I SLAKE I 


4 


M 


Samuel Stephen GROVER-1351 






Bom 19 May 1878 


Place Grouse Creek, Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 


23 May 1886 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Jul 1901 


LOGAN 




Died 20 Jul 1901 | Place Archer, Fremont. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried I Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer. Madison, Idaho 


Spouse unmarried -4728 




MRIN. 549 


5 


,,. 


Married [ Place 


SeaISp 


I 


M Elisha Freeman GROVER-1352 




I 






Bom 1 1 Apr 1880 j Place Grouse Creek, Box Elder. Utah 


Baptized 


3 Oct 1889 




Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


11 Jul 19501 


IFALL 




Died 17 Sep 1951 Place Archer. Madison, I Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC_L 






Buried 20 Sep 1951 I Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 










Spouse Emma Ma 

Married 22 NOV 1904 


ria ERICKSON-1464 




MRIN: 550 




Place St. Anthony, Fremont, I Idaho 


SeaISp 


11 Jul 1 950 ! IFALL 


6 


F 


Caroline Elizabeth GROVER-1353 






Bom 13 Mar 1882 Place Grouse Creek, Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 


7 May 1891 






Chr. J Place 


Endowed 


1 Feb 1917 


LOGAN 






Died 24 Jan 1912 j Place Archer, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried j Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison, Idaho 








spouse unmarried -4729 




MRIN: 551 




Married ] Place 


SeaISp 


I 



333 



Family Group Record- 545 



Page 2 of 2 



10 



11 



12 



13 



Husband Marshall Hubbard GROVER-1505 


wife lsabelleORR-1347 


■ ' i 

Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M Lyman Emery GROVER-1355 




Bom 15 Dec 1884 ! Place Grouse Creek. Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 


6 Sep 1894! 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


15 May 1913 1 SLAKE 


Died 9 Aug 1895 


Place Archer, Fremont, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC i 


Buried 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison, Idaho 


spouse unmarried -4730 




MRIN: 553 , 


Married | Place 


SeaISp 


l ! 


M John OrrGROVER-1 356 




Bom 8 Nov 1886 


Place Grouse Creek, Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 


2 Jul 1894 i 


Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Mar 1914 SLAKE 


Died 25 Dec 1968 


Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BICi 




Buned 28 Dec 1968 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 








spouse EleanoreHOMER-1465 




MRIN: 554 




Married 4 Mar 1914 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


4 Mar 1914! SLAKE 


M 


William Leslie GROVER-1357 


1 


Bom 12 Mar 1889 


Place Grouse Creek, Box Elder, Utah 


Baptized 


6 Jun 1897 1 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


7 Jun 1911 SLAKE 


: 


Died 23 Jun 1955 


Place Archer, Mdsn, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC) 


Buried 27 Jun 1955 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


spouse Sarah Grace SQUIRES-1466 




MRIN: 555 


Married 7 Jun 191 1 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


7 Jun 191TT SLAKE 


M 


Seth Bennett GROVER SR.-1358 


,_.,. 


Bom 30Mav1891 


Place Lyman, Fremont, lldaho 


Baptized 


3 Jun 1900 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


14 May 1913 


SLAKE 


Died 23 Dec 1957 ! Place Idaho Falls. Bonneville, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 27 Dec 1957 ) Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 


spouse Blanche Tressa YOUNG-1467 




MRIN: 556 




Married 26 Sep 1910 i Place St. Anthony, Fremont, ID 


SeaISp 


15 Mav 1913 I 




spouse Hannah Elizabeth SIMMONS-1468 




MRIN: 557 




Married 14 Mav 191 3 (D) Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


14 May 1913 i SLAKE 




spouse Alta JENKINS- 1469 




MRIN: 558 




Married 16Jun1928 I Place Jackson, Teton, Wyoming 


SeaISp 


I 


M ! Wesley La Vem GROVER-1359 




Bom 13 May 1894 


place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


4 Jun 1904 j 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


13 Apr 1967! IFALL 




Died 22 Sep 1955 Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


bicT 




Buried 27 Sep 1955 i Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer, Madison, Idaho 








spouse Ilia Irene SIBBITTS-1470 




MRIN: 559 


Married 18 Jan 1918 I Place Shelley. Bingham. Idaho 


SeaISp 


7 Auq 1970! IFALL 




spouse Thelma CARLSON- 1471 




MRIN: 560 




Married 28 Apr 1922 1 Place Riqbv, Jefferson, Idaho 


SeaISp 


13 Apr 1967 I IFALL 


M i Raymond GROVER-1360 




Bom 24 May 1897 


Place Lyman, Madison, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Jul 1905 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


7 Feb 1946 


IFALL 


Died 24 Sep 1975 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 27 Sep 1975 


Place Sutton Cemetery, Archer, Madison. Idaho 








spouse Katie Arborella BROWNING-1472 




MRIN: 561 




warned 21 Jun 1916 ! Place Rexburq. Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


7 Feb 1946 i IFALL 


spouse |na Waldemar BRANSON-1 354 




MRIN. 552 




Married 12 Mar 1952 I Place Pocatello Bannock. Idaho 


SeaISp 


1 Oct 20041 IFALL 1 


m h 


! 


Bom 1 Auq 1899 I Place Lyman, Fremont, Idaho 


Baptized 


2 Aug 1907 




Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


1 Aug 1989 


IFALL 


Died 19 jun 1983 Place Idaho Falls, Bonneville. Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




I Buried 23 Jun 1983 ! Place Menan Butte Cemetery Jefferson. Idaho 








spouse Isabella BROWNING-1 361 




MRIN: 562 




Married 28 Apr 1917 ! Place Rexburq, Madison, Idaho 


SeaISp 


1 Aua 1989 I IFALL 



334 7 Mar 2006 



Marshall Hubbard Grover (1846) & Isabelle Orr (1852) 

Descendants 



Children 



Grandchildren 



Spouses 



# Children 



Marshall Thomas Grover (1872) 

Ida Isabelle Grover (4-13-1874) 

Marshall Leslie Weekes (1895) 
Susan Isabell Weekes (1898) 

William Lyman Weekes (1900) 
Bertha Rebecca Weekes (1903) 
Maude Christina Weekes (1904) 
John Samuel Weekes, Jr. (1906) 
Robert Ursel Weekes (1907) 
Nora Opal Weekes (1910) 
Pearl Eldora Weekes (1912) 
Alta Grace Weekes (1914) 
Madonna Weekes (1919) 



Robert Edgar Grover (1876) 

Samuel Steven Grover (1878) 

Elisha Freeman Grover (4-1 1-1880) 

Thomas Marshall Grover (1905) 
Samuel Erick Grover (1907) 
Agnes Christina Grover (1909) 
Edna Grover (1911) 
Elsie Grover (191 1) 
Stephen Elisha Grover (1913) 
Mark Grover (1916) 
Carl Spencer Grover (1918) 
Dayton E. Grover (1921) 
Zola Emma Grover (1924) 
Heber Grover (1927) 



John Samuel Weekes 



John Jensen 




George Francis Nelson 


4 







Olin Henry Jeppson 


9 


Gerald Jeppa Jeppson 


4 












Keith Clements 





Lynn Randall 


3 


Everett Brindle 


3 


Newell Piquet 


11 




32 


Martha E. Harris 






Emma Marie Erickson 

Verna Olsen 6 

Barbara Evalyne Anderson 5 

Joseph La Vel Orr 12 

Learin A. Terry 4 

Ellis Wilmer Wilcox 5 

Beatrice Rula Worlton 8 

Erma Arville Boulter 5 

Melva Weekes 1 

LaTrese Crowell 6 

Edward Addison Holden 1 

Sharon DeMott 3 

56 



Caroline Elizabeth Grover (1882) 
Lyman Emery Grover (1884) 







335 



John OrrGrover (11-8-1886) 

John Russell Grover(1914) 
Wesley Marshall Grover(1917) 

Ruth Elnorah Grover (1919) 
Blanche Marie Grover (1925) 
Loren Homer Grover ( 1 929) 



William Leslie Grover (3-12-1889) 

William DeLore Grover (1912) 
Marshall Glen Grover (1915) 
Wallace Leon Grover (1926) 
Grace LaRee Grover (1929) 
Shirley Fontaine Grover (1936) 



Seth Bennett Grover (5-30-1891) 

Seth Bennett Grover, Jr. (191 1) 



Seth Bennett Grover 

Blanche Alta Grover (1913) 
Melba Caroline Grover (1915) 
Afton Bernice Grover (1917) 
FerrelS. Grover (191 9) 



Seth Bennett Grover 

Faye LaRue Grover (1929) 

Barbara Maxine Grover ( 1 834) 



Wesley LaVern Grover (5-13-1894) 

Nina Tereesa Grover (1923) 
Baby Grover (1925) 
Thelma Irene Grover ( 1 926) 
Doris Delain Grover (1928) 
Etta Gwen Grover (1930) 
Zenda Ileen Grover (1933) 



Elnorah Ann Homer 




LuDean Anderson 


5 


Betty Louise Riggan 


1 


Elizabeth LaRue Briggs 


5 


Afton Elwin Hansen 


8 


Cleo Dwaine Kirkham 


4 


Leona Dell Stoker 


4 




28 


Sarah Grace Squires 




Veola Young 


4 


Verda Hadlock 


3 


Sarah Donna Myler 


4 


Keith Munsee 


5 


Vardus Radford 


4 




20 


Blanche Therese Young 




Emma Margaret Wright 


3 

3 


Hannah Elizabeth Simmons 



1 


Joseph Garvin Guthridge 


Maurice Sharp 


4 


5 


Alta Jenkins 


DeLos Glen Huntsman 


4 


Larry Fowler 


2 


Donald Yorgensen 





Cody Keele 


4 




10 


Ilia Irene Sibbits 




Thelma Carlson 




Gene L. Dumont 


2 

3 


J.Gordon Fickstad 


Nyle Cleo Larsen 


1 


Dale F. Sommer 


2 


Francis Ray Sharp 


3 




11 



336 



Raymond Grover (5-24-1897) 

Howard Raymond Grover (1917) 
Edmond Marshall Grover (1918) 
Don Emery Grover ( 1 92 1 ) 
I la Kate Grover (1923) 
Fern Leah Grover (1926) 
Baby Girl (1928) 
Ira Kent Grover (1929) 
Ona Ludean Grover (1932) 
Leslie B. Grover (1934) 
Baby Girl (1937) 
Baby Boy (1940) 
BelvaRae Grover (1941) 



Clifford Grover (8-1-1899) 

Jonathan Grant Grover (1918) 
Lucille Irene Grover (1922) 
Louis Clifford Grover (1926) 
Isabelle Grover (1928) 
Stanley Mack Grover (1930) 
Clinton DeLore Grover (1932) 
Dorothy Jane Grover (1937) 



Kate A. Browning 

Ina May Waldmar Brunson 

Bonnie Lee Kelley 


7 

1 

4 
1 

3 
5 
4 



Reah Weatherston 
Ray James McBride 
Warren Leatham 


Elna Helen Branson 
James Howard Thompson 
Loise Margaret Hoopes 


Thomas Ivan Roth 




2 
27 


Isabella Browning 
Theola Eddie 
Vernal Mertis Morgan 
Donna Marie Hill 


2 
4 
3 

4 
3 
4 

20 


Flora Simmons 
Patsy Catherine Covert 
Richard Ellis Carter 
George Hartwell 



Compiled by Joan Nykamp 2006. 



337 




Marshall Hubbard Grover 



Isabelle Orr Grover 



338 




Family of Marshall Grover and Isabelle Orr. Front: Ida. Lyman Seth (on his father's knee), 
Marshall, John (standing behind William), Isabelle, Caroline. Back: Elisha, Samuel, Robert. 




Mother Isabelle Orr Grover 
holding daughter, Ida Isabelle 
Grover Weekes 



339 




Standing: John, Seth, Will and Ida 
Sitting: Caroline and Elisha (Grover) 




340 



Back Row: Ray, Seth, Will and Cliff 
Front: L-R Rob, Vern, Ida, Elisha and John Grover 




Home of Marshall & Isabella Grover 




Marshall Grover & Family, near their first home in Idaho 



341 



MARSHALL HUBBARD GROVER 

On September 27 th , 1846, Marshall Hubbard Grover was born to Thomas and Caroline 
Nickerson Hubbard Grover near Nauvoo, Illinois. In her own words, Marshall's mother Caroline 
writes, "September 27 th , 1846 my son Marshall Hubbard was born. On September 28" 1 , one day 
after Marshall's birth we crossed the river again, living out of doors and traveling seven weeks 
before he was even dressed in a house after the first day. This is only a little of my suffering." 
(Caroline E. Graver; Terrace, Box Elder Co., Utah, February 6, 1881.) 

Marshall's father was absent at the time of his birth, February 8th, 1846. Before 
Marshall's birth, mobs were forcing Latter-day Saints from their homes in Nauvoo, Illinois. 
Thomas and Caroline Grover began their trek westward across the plains in company with the 
saints. Four months later, weary and warn, they reached Mount Pisgah, a distance of about 150 
miles from Nauvoo. Here it was learned that the entire company could not continue the journey 
westward. Thomas was permitted to go on, but Caroline had to return to Nauvoo. From one of 
Caroline's writings we read the following, "February 8, 1846 we left Nauvoo after having had 
our endowments in the Temple in Nauvoo. Now was the time of trial for in crossing the 
Mississippi River, the boat was sunk by a plank being trampled by one of the oxen. Twenty-two 
souls were on the flat boat. All seemed lost, but here was another miraculous escape. It was on a 
sandbar. The wagons were all under water but they burst off the covers and all climbed upon the 
bows. My little girl, Percia, three years old saying, 'Lord save my little heart.' Not one soul 
perished. All got off safely with the loss of most of our things but the provision wagon was not 
aboard. We traveled in snow and cold frozen weather until we reached Pisgah about one hundred 
and fifty miles from Nauvoo, having been on the road four months. It proved that the entire 
company could not continue the journey. From this point I returned to Nauvoo." 

This proved to be a final separation for Thomas and Caroline. Thomas Grover was 
Caroline's second husband. She was first married to her true love, Marshall Hubbard, who died 
September 18 th , 1838, from congestive chills. One cannot help but find it interesting that 
Caroline named her son Marshall Hubbard Grover after her first husband, even though this was a 
son of Thomas Grover. It shows her deep love and affection for her first husband. 

Caroline, with young Marshall and his sister, 3 year old Percia, was still desirous of 
coming west. She began again, this time in 1 846 with her parents, a sister and brother and their 
families, in the Andrew Jackson Stewart Company. They arrived in Salt Lake on the 16 th of 
September, 1850. Marshall was about 4 years of age at this time. The next spring, on the 22 nd of 
February, 1851, Caroline married Andrew Jackson Stewart. Caroline asked for a divorce from 
Thomas Grover and Andrew Stewart acted as proxy for the sealing of Caroline to Marshall 
Moore Hubbard. This is the second time Caroline had married a polygamist. From an article in 
the Payson Chronicle written by Rhea C. Hone, we read the following in regard to Andrew J. 
Stewart, "Andrew J. Stewart was born 12th of September, 1819 at the Jackson Township, 
Monroe county, Ohio, He joined the Mormon church the 8 th of February, 1 844 and arrived in 
Salt Lake the 16 th of September, 1850. Here he was asked to join a party headed for Peteeneet in 
Central Utah. En route, he made a survey of other possible settlements as requested by Brigham 
Young, then made a survey of the area of Peteeneet. He was the first Utah County surveyor, 
receiving his commission December 20"\ 1850 at Payson, Utah. He held this position until 
1854." 

His contribution to the territory was the importing of fine-blooded horses. He was 
recognized as one of the professional stock raisers of America. His horses were bred for size, 



342 



action and endurance suitable for farming, livery stables and government service. He established 
a race track to prove the worth of his horses. 

His first wife, Eunice Peas Haws Stewart, whom he married the l sl of January 1844, was 
a midwife. She attended births in Provo, Benjamin and Payson. She died of pneumonia at the age 
of 43 years." -Payson Chronicle, Rhea C. Hone. 

Andrew and Caroline had only one son, Moses Carlos, born the 1 st of January, 1852. He 
died in October of 1853. Ida Grover Weekes, daughter of Marshall, told her daughter, Opal 
Weekes Clements, that Caroline taught school in Provo. Caroline and Marshall are listed as 
living in Provo in the 1856 census. However, in 1860, in the Tooele County census, they are 
listed as living in Grantsville, Utah, "Caroline, age 52 and Marshall 14 years of age, with real 
estate property valued at $150 and Marshall having attended school in Grantsville." Marshall's 
mother was a school teacher, therefore he must have gained an education from his mother, 
starting at a very young age. We know very little about Marshall during his teenage years, but it 
seems due to his love of and interest in fine-blooded horses, that he may have been close to his 
stepfather, Andrew J. Stewart. However, there is no factual evidence of this, only a commonality 
that seems a fitting connection between the stepfather and son. We don't know how much time 
Andrew spent with Marshall and Caroline. He had three other wives at that time. We do know 
that the 1960 census shows Marshall and Caroline living in Grantsville, Utah, after they moved 
from Provo. We also read in Andrew Jackson Stewart's biography, "About 1866 or 1867 a 
disastrous accident occurred which resulted in the death of a nephew of Jackson. The incident 
threw the family into a state of adversity. His three plural wives, Caroline Eliza Nickerson, Mary 
Maria Judd and Catherine Halden left him. Eliza moved to Grantsville Tooele County, Catherine 
moved to Southern Utah and Mary Maria Judd (Stewart) moved to California, taking her four 
living sons." 

December 1 1 th , 1871, is when Marshall took his sweetheart, Isabelle Orr, a most capable 
and efficient maiden, from her home in Grantsville, Utah, to the Endowment House in Salt Lake 
City to became his companion for time and eternity. Their means of travel was a team of horses 
and a buggy. The fact that theirs was a temple marriage suggests the fact that Marshall had 
stayed close to the church in order to be worthy of a temple recommend. 

Marshall and Isabelle's first home together was in Grantsville, Utah, where Marshall was 
engaged in farming. Marshall and Isabelle tell about an experience they had about a five acre 
plot of wheat. They were nearly ready to harvest when the grasshoppers came, and how hard all 
the people worked to save this piece of grain. They killed the grasshoppers with sticks, drove 
them into rows of straw and burned them. While they were fighting the grasshoppers with very 
little success, they prayed to the Lord to help to save this piece of grain. Just then the seagulls 
came. They would fill up on grasshoppers and would fly off to the shore of the lake and vomit 
them up. Then they would come back and repeat this until the grasshoppers were destroyed. The 
people knew this was an answer to their prayers. They were very thankful that the Lord had 
saved this grain. This incident added strength to the testimonies of these people including 
Marshall and Isabelle. Their first child, Marshall Thomas was born there on December 14th, 

1872. Sadly though, this little child only lived a short time and passed away on August 31 s1 , 

1873, and was laid to rest in the Grantsville cemetery, Ida Isabelle, their second child was born 
on April 13 th , 1874, and Robert Edgar arrived on April 5 th , 1876, also in Grantsville. While the 
members of this family were young, they had trying days to feed and clothe the children. They 
would boil a little wheat and then put a little in a glass of milk. Then Grandmother Grover would 
say. "Eat away, eat away, there is wheat in the bottom!" 



343 



About that time in the year of 1877 Marshall was asked by authorities of the Latter-days 
Saints Church to move to the North Western town of Grouse Creek, Utah, to supervise a small 
tribe of Ute Indians. Marshall taught the Indians the customs and culture of the Mormon 
pioneers that lived in Utah at that time. He befriended the native Indians and was able to win 
their love and respect. They called him their "White Papa" and often during the nights, Indians 
who had been drinking came to Marshall's house seeking attention and food to eat. Isabelle 
prepared and served food any hour of the night. 

Grouse Creek was a dry, barren area and Marshall found it difficult to provide the 
standard of living for his family that he desired. In order to supplement his income he hauled 
freight to and from Tacoma, Nevada, to Grouse Creek, Utah. The trip required three or four days 
with a team of horses and wagon. Life wasn't easy. There were many trials and hardships. 
Likewise there were many rewarding experiences. The following children were born in Grouse 
Creek: Samuel Stephen born May 19 th , 1878, Elisha Freeman born April 11 th , 1880, Caroline 
Elizabeth born March 13 th , 1882, Lyman Emery born December 15 th , 1884, John On* on 
November 8 th , 1886 and William Leslie on March 12 th , 1889, making a family of nine children. 

After twelve years of service, Marshall was granted a release from his responsibilities on 
the Reservation in Grouse Creek. The Indians loved the family and had become staunch and 
loyal friends. They hated to see the Grover family leave. There were other friends also, but 
goodbyes were said. About this same time, Marshall's mother, Caroline Eliza Nickerson passed 
away on the 18 th of July 1889 in Grantsville, Utah. Marshall and Isabelle were called to help 
pioneer Idaho. Marshall made a trip to Idaho and arranged to buy 160 acres of land in Lyman, 
Idaho. Preparations were made for the move. There were small children, baby William was only 
a few months old, so there had to be a covered wagon and another wagon to bring furniture, 
implements, etc. They began their journey. 

Ida, on her special pony, with some help from younger brothers, drove the cattle and 
extra horses. Progress was slow over the sage covered plains. They presented a true picture of 
pioneer life as they wended their way northward. 

When they arrived in Fort Hall, Indians there greeted them. Recognizing Marshall as the 
"White Papa" and his family from Grouse Creek, they asked permission to herd the cattle and 
horses while the family stopped to rest. Marshall wondered if they might steal from his herds 
since they were so anxious to help. They insisted saying, "We know White Papa, he is our friend 
too." They assured Marshall they would bring them back safely. True to their word, at the 
appointed time, the stock came back in fine condition. It was a golden opportunity for Isabelle 
and daughters, Ida and Caroline. They washed clothes, cooked and baked for the remainder of 
theirjoumey. 

When they arrived at the Snake River, there was no bridge, so they had to be ferried 
across. The ferry was a crude structure without sides, only ropes tied from comer to corner to 
help hold smaller animals on it. All older stock were forced to swim across the river. It was in 
the day before reservoirs were built, so the water was swift and high. The crossing was made 
without any problems, however, not without fear for Isabelle and the children. 

On July 24, 1889, after crossing the Snake River, the family went north to Burton to the 
William Beatty residence for a brief visit. Mr. Beatty had helped make initial arrangements for 
the Grover homestead. A William Beatty was listed in the 1860 census as living in the same 
household as Marshall, in Grantsville, Utah. 



344 



On July 29, 1899, Marshall, Isabelle and family traveled south to their new home in 
Lyman, Fremont County, Idaho. The location came to be known as Grover's Lane. It's now 
7200 South, Archer, Madison, Idaho. 

The house was a log building with only two rooms. There was a well, several shade trees, 
and a chicken coop. There was much work to be done. Cleaning began immediately. The walls 
of the house were white washed with lime and water brushed on them. A ceiling was made with 
factory material that Isabelle had brought. Doors and window frames were given a fresh coat of 
paint. Homemade carpet covered the bedroom floor. The other floor was bare, but the boards 
were scrubbed and kept clean. Their furniture consisted of four beds, a dresser, three rocking 
chairs, and smaller chairs, a table, cupboard, a washstand and cook stove. 

The family was crowded, so as soon as possible, two bedrooms were added, which 
relieved the conditions until about 1909 or 1910 when a large and lovely new rock house was 
built. It was two stories in height, had a large porch, a kitchen, pantry and dining room and also a 
parlor with bedrooms and closets upstairs and down. How they must have loved that spacious 
new home. 

Of the 160 acres they homesteaded, the larger part was a waving mass of sage, varying in 
height from three to five feet. Where grain had been planted, they cut heads of grain that had 
been left standing with scissors and picked up those on the ground. Gleaners they were in the 
truest sense of the word. Each head was a "grain of gold." 

Four more sons were added to the family after they moved to Idaho. Seth Bennett was 
born on the 30 th of May, 1891. Wesley LaVern was bom on the 13" 1 of May, 1894, Raymond on 
24 th of May, 1897 and Clifford on the 1 st of August 1899. 

They planted additional fruit and shade trees, a garden and lawn. They had their own 
chickens, eggs, meat and milk. Isabelle and the girls churned butter, made mince meat, canned 
fruit, made jelly and jam, and of course bread. Foods such as flour, salt and sugar and some 
cereals were purchased in large quantities, twenty-five, fifty or one hundred pound bags. 
Marshall was a very good provider for his family. Isabelle was an industrious, hard worker, 
always doing her part to help sustain the family. The children were taught to work, there was no 
idleness. Economy was uppermost on their minds.. It still wasn't easy to provide for a family of 
twelve children. Only a small part of the acreage had been cleared of sage and planted. Digging 
and burning the sage seemed a never-ending task, but had to be completed so the soil could be 
cultivated and planted. When dried and ready to be burned, the sage made lively large bonfires. 
The family was friendly and invited friends and neighbors in to enjoy the sport. In the autumn, 
after fields had been harvested, Isabelle took the younger children with some knives and scissors 
into the field to gather the heads of the grain missed by the harvester. 

They were early risers and hard workers. Marshall was active in civic affairs. He served 
as director on the Lenroot Canal during the time of its enlargement, also when water rights were 
decreed. He was selected with others to arbitrate when trouble arose between neighbors. He 
served on the jury several times. He was always ready and anxious to help in times of illness and 
he was known to be more efficient than most women when caring for the ill. He gave freely of 
his time to help those in need. 

He was active in the church, serving as a ward teacher for many years and also as a home 
missionary. He served as President of the Elder's Quorum, a teacher and on November 23, 1899, 
he was called to serve as secretary/treasurer of the MIA. In 1892 when John Castle was President 
of the MIA, there was no adopted manual for the adult class. Marshall was one of three selected 



345 



to prepare a manual for the adult class. At times like this, Marshall must have felt fortunate to 
have been raised in the home of a school teacher. 

In 1898 when the Lyman Ward Chapel was completed, Marshall received honorable 
mention far his generous contributions of time and cash. 

He enjoyed and owned choice horses which he loved to ride, drive and race. He kept 
them in fine condition. He enjoyed pitching horseshoes, playing ball, dancing and swimming. 
When work was being done on the head of the canal and river and there was a need for a cable to 
be carried across the river, either Marshall or George Weekes were summoned because they 
were excellent swimmers and appeared to be unafraid of the swift current in the Snake River. 
Marshall lived a full, useful life. He loved the Idaho homestead; living there and enjoying good 
health until the last few years of his life. He passed away February 8, 1918. He was buried in the 
Sutton Cemetery in Archer, Madison County, Idaho. His wife Isabelle, daughter Ida, and the 
following sons survived him; Robert, Elisha, John, William, Seth, Lavern, Raymond and 
Clifford. Marshall & Isabelle left a great posterity of 1 1 children and 64 grandchildren. 

Bibliography 

History of Marshall Hubbard Grover by Opal Weekes Clements. 

Thomas Grover his Ancestors and Descendants. 

Edited by Joan Piquet Nykamp for this publication. (2006) 




Marshall Hubbard Grover's Horse-powered Threshing Machine 



346 



ISABELLE ORR GROVER 

Isabelle Orr Grover was born May 18 th , 1852, in a south eastern coastal town known as 
Kirkcaldy, Scotland. Being born to Thomas and Christina Bennett Orr, Isabelle was the oldest of 
eleven children, six girls and five boys. She and her younger brother Robert were the only children 
born in Scotland before Isabelle and her family moved to America to enjoy religious freedom. 

Isabelle's grandparents, Robert and Elizabeth Orr, had joined the church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints and came to America in 1 853 from Scotland. They lived in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
for a couple of years. Robert hauled rock for the construction of the Salt Lake Temple. In 1 856 they 
moved to Grantsville, Utah, about 31 miles west of Salt Lake City. There they built a house of logs 
on the corner of Clark and Cooley Streets. They opened a small store, which they took care of for 
many years. 

After Isabelle's grandparents immigrated to America, her parents, Thomas and Christina 
Bennett Orr, were anxious to do the same. They made plans and arranged to come to America in the 
year of 1855. At this time. President Brigham Young of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints had sent an epistle to members of the Church in every land. This specific epistle invited and 
encouraged all church members and people to come to the "Valley of the Mountains." Saints living 
in England and Scotland were advised to come by way of New Orleans on the all-water route that 
eventually brought them to Kanesville, Iowa. The epistle ended with these words, "We are at peace 
with all nations, all kingdoms and governments, with all authorities under the whole heavens except 
the kingdom and power of darkness. We are ready to stretch forth our arms to the four quarters of 
the globe extending salvation to every honest soul for our mission in the gospel of Jesus Christ is 
from sea to sea and from the rivers to the ends of the earth." This made Thomas and Christina On- 
even more anxious to immigrate to America with their two young children. Early in the spring of 
1 855, they left their native homeland of Scotland for America on the ship "Falcon". 

Isabelle was a pretty little girl of three years dressed in long full skirts and petticoats. Robert, 
her younger brother, was over a year old with pretty golden curls over which he wore a little Scottish 
cap. 

Little is known of Isabelle's voyage to America. However, from Journal History of the L.D.S 
Church we learn that they crossed the plains in a company or team funded by the L.D.S. Perpetual 
Emigration Fund. Isabelle's company consisted of 402 souls, 200 oxen, 24 cows, 3 horses, and 1 
mule. The company left Atchison, Kansas, on July 1 st , 1855 with Richard Ballantyne and several 
other missionaries in charge of the group. 

The company arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the 25 th of September, 1855. (For further 
details see Journal History of the L.D.S. Church, page 4, 26 September 1 855.) With Isabelle and her 
brother Robert at their young ages, the trip across the plains was hard. Their first home in America 
was in Grantsville, Utah. It was a log building built along Main Street on the block where the high 
school stands today (1973). 

In 1 854, not long before their arrival in Grantsville, the Church Headquarters had directed 
the people of Grantsville to build a fort for the protection of the Saints against the Indian raids. This 
fort was centered around the present day Clark and Cooley Streets intersection (where Isabelle's 
grandparents lived). The Saints tore down their homes and moved them close together in that area 
and built the Grantsville Fort around them. The wall was built with mud and adobe and was five feet 
thick at the bottom and eighteen inches thick at the top. As the men were away often due to the 
Indian raids, the women and children lived in the Fort. The first real church building was completed 



347 



there in 1866 and still stands. The school house also was built across Cooley St. from the church. 
Isabelle, being a young girl at that time, attended school and church there and spent much time in 
the Fort. As things with the Indians got better, the Saints again moved their homes back to their own 
property. 

Being the oldest child, Isabelle worked hard helping to provide food and clothing for the 
family. She worked in the garden, picked berries and other fruit to can or dry. Early in life she 
learned to sew, knit, and spin. She made countless mittens and stockings. 

Marshall Hubbard Grover had moved to Grantsville in 1 860 at the age of 1 4 years. There was 
only one school and one Ward there, they must have become acquainted soon after that. He was six 
years her senior but with a one room school house they would have spent time together even in 
school. Then in 1 87 1 , when Isabelle was 1 9 years old, she and Marshall were engaged to be married. 
She was indeed well prepared and ready to assume the responsibilities that would come with 
marriage. On December 11 th , 1871, Marshall called for Isabelle and took her to the Endowment 
House in Salt Lake City, Utah. They were married and sealed for time and eternity. Their first home 
was in Grantsville, Utah, where Marshall was a farmer. Their home was a two-bedroom home with 
shingles, which was better than many at that time. 

Much joy came into their lives when a son, Marshall Thomas was born December 1 4 lh , 1 872. 
Sadly, their joy was of a short duration because he passed away August 21 st , 1873. He was laid to 
rest in the Grantsville Cemetery and was the only one of their family buried there. 

In the springtime of the next year, Isabelle and Marshall were blessed with a baby girl whom 
they named Ida Isabelle. Ida was bom April 13 th , 1874. Two years later on April 5 th , 1876 another 
son, Robert was born. About this time Marshall was called to supervise the Indians in Grouse Creek, 
Utah. This small town is located about 247 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah. Grouse Creek is 
close to the north west border between Utah, Idaho, and Nevada. Samuel Stephen was born May 1 9 th , 
1878 in their new home located in Grouse Creek, Box Elder County. 

Here other children were born to the family; Elisha Freeman born April 1 1 th , 1 880, Caroline 
Elizabeth born March 1 3 th , 1 882, Lyman Emery born December 1 5 th , 1 884, John Orr born November 
8 th , 1886, and William Leslie born March 12 th , 1886. With the addition of six new family members 
it is easy to understand that Isabelle was a busy mother and homemaker. Marshall spent some time 
hauling freight from Rocky Pass, Nevada. While he was away Isabelle was alone with the children. 
She knew neither ease nor luxury. 

It was difficult to provide for a family in an area as barren and unproductive as Grouse Creek. 
Due to this fact Marshall was granted a release as Supervisor of the Indians in 1 889 after twelve and 
a half years there. They were happy with thoughts of moving to Idaho, which was a much more 
productive and fertile area. Arrangements were made to purchase a home in Lyman, Fremont 
County, about 26 miles north east of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Goodbyes were said to all friends, both 
Indians and those of the Grouse Creek community. They were indeed pioneers as they wended their 
way north. 

Ida and Rob rode horses and drove cattle. Baby William was about 4 months old, in fact there 
were five children under ten years of age to be fed, clothed and amused in a covered wagon for the 
271 mile estimated trek to Lyman, Idaho. Stops along the way were used to wash and bake. 

How happy they must have been to arrive at their new home in Lyman, July 25 th , 1 889. A 
two-room log house, a chicken coop, a well and several trees welcomed the family. Some of the 1 60 
acres had been cleared, the remainder was a mass of waving sagebrush waiting to be pulled or cut 
and piled and burned. 



348 



The house was cleaned, doors and window frames were painted, and Isabelle had brought 
factory-new muslin material to make a ceiling for them. She had also made a carpet for the bedroom 
floor. When the furniture; four beds, a dresser, table, chairs, cupboard, stove, a box heater, three 
rocking chairs and a wash stand were moved in, the home was quite attractive, but small for a family 
of eight children. It was scrubbed and kept clean and shiny. Other pieces of furniture were added as 
needed. Their home was always comfortable, clean and cheery. We see from the picture of the home 
a few years after their arrival that Marshall had added an addition on the north side of the house, 
likely to be bedrooms. 

Days were busy for the family. They had a large garden and planted more fruit and shade 
trees. Isabelle and her daughters Ida and Caroline canned and dried fruits and vegetables and made 
countless jars of preserves which she kept in large stone jars. Isabelle made her own mincemeat from 
ground beef, raisins and other fruits. During that first fall in Idaho, their neighbor, Samuel Weekes, 
Sr. raised a crop of sugar cane from which he made molasses. Marshall bought two fifty gallon 
barrels for Isabelle and the family to enjoy. Many friends came to share taffy candy and other treats 
in their home. Without refrigeration, milk was poured into large shallow pans and set in the cellar 
to cool. When the cream rose it was skimmed and churned into butter for family use. Water for all 
purposes had to be drawn from the well. In order to have hot water it had to be heated in the 
teakettle, reservoir or boiler for bathing and the family wash. 

Washing was done by rubbing clothes on a washboard in a large galvanized tub. Each batch 
of clothes was put into the second tub and scrubbed again then rinsed. For white clothing, after the 
second washing, the white clothes were put into the boiler and boiled for several minutes to keep 
them white. Then, they were put through the rinse and bluing waters -each time they were wrung 
by hand before the wringer became common. Drying was done on the clothesline outside or around 
the stove inside. Ironing was done with flat irons heated on the stove, summer or winter, it had to 
be done. It was long before polyester and other wrinkle-free materials were known. 

Four sons were added to the family after they moved to Idaho. Seth Bennett was born May 
30 th , 1891, Wesley Lavern was born May 13 th , 1894, Raymond was born May 24 th , 1897, and 
Clifford was born August 1 st , 1899. 

Cooking for a large family of boys was like cooking for threshers, three meals each day. 
Isabelle was a good cook and a fine homemaker and Marshall provided well for his family. Isabelle 
was thrifty and industrious. She could always make an extra bed or two on a moments notice. She 
always had surplus of warm homemade quilts on hand. During harvest season she took the young 
children with her into the field to glean the heads of grain that were left by the harvester. 

In about 1 909 Isabelle and Marshall were able to build a new home with plenty of space for 
their family. It was made of rock, was two stories high, had a large porch, a kitchen, pantry and 
dining room and also a parlor, with bedrooms and closets upstairs and down. They planted more fruit 
trees and a lawn. After thirty eight years of marriage, Isabelle finally had some of the comforts of 
life. They still had some teenage children living at home, sons to help with all the work. Marshall 
died nine years later and Isabelle just one year after that. 

Her health was a problem during the sunset years of her life. She was confined to her rocking 
chair due to painful feet and legs that failed to heal because she was diabetic. She passed from this 
life October 25"', 1919, and was buried in the Sutton Cemetery in Archer, Idaho. Preceding her in 
death were her husband Marshall, who passed away Febmary 8, 1918, daughter Caroline January 
24 th , 1912, Samuel July 20 th , 1 90 1 , Lyman August 9 th , 1 895, and Marshall Thomas August 2 1 st , 1 873. 



349 



Isabelle Orr Grover' s life was one of perseverance and fulfillment. Her personality of 
diligence and strong will shines through from her history. The blessing of being such a great mother 
and wife are examples to all that read about her life. 

Dictated by Ida Grover Weekes — daughter of Isabelle Orr Grover 
Written by a Granddaughter — Opal W. Clements 
Edited for publication by Kimberly & Joan Nykamp 



350 



INDIAN JACK STORIES 

My mother, Ida Grover Weekes, was the oldest daughter of Marshall and Isabelle 
Grover. She could remember living in Grouse Creek as a child and remembered the good friend, 
Indian Jack. She used to tell us stories about him and his wives Nancy and Annie. 

During the later years of her life, mother learned that even though Indian Jack would be 
an old man, he was still living somewhere on the reservation at Fort Hall. She wanted to see him 
again so one day in 1938 or 1939, 1 took her and father to see if she could locate him. We took a 
box of cookies, candy, pop and other delicacies for him. We drove to Fort Hall and inquired at 
the store as to where we'd find him, if he were really still living. Some one told us that he lived 
with a son on the Fort Hall Reservation south west of Pocatello. We drove out attempting to 
locate the home, but it was difficult due to winding and very poor roads and sketchy information. 
Few Indians could speak enough English to give us definite directions. Mother was anxious to 
see him so we kept trying. Eventually we found the place, far from nowhere. There was so little, 
only a small log house, no car, no animals. It seemed there was no one home. There was no sign 
of life, as we were about to leave, we went to look in a bowery, a lean-to on the end of the house 
shaded by a roof of willows and branches. There was no air moving, it was hot and dry in 
August. It was cooler inside and lying on a pile of old clothes was Indian Jack. His body was so 
frail and wasted. His clothes were dirty and un-kept. We explained who we were and he seemed 
to remember. He begged us to get the medicine man. "I'm so sick, here," he said, pointing to his 
stomach. Father, John Weekes, handed him a bottle of root beer saying, "Drink this it will make 
you feel better." Jack didn't take it thinking it was an intoxicating drink. He told us his son had 
"gone bad" drinks to much, won't work, gambles, etc. Father took the cap off the bottle and 
sipped a bit of root beer then said, "It's all right, it will be good for you." Jack took hold of his 
long sleeve garment saying, "I still have my religion." He was indeed a Latter Day Saint, careful 
about his actions. 

It saddened our hearts to see his body wasting away, lying in extreme poverty. We 
wanted to pick him up and bring him home with us so we could give him the comforts of life. 
Our hearts were heavy as we looked at his poor thin body, yet we were gratified to see that at 
such a ripe old age (nearly 1 12) he had remained true to the faith he had cherished in his youth. 

Our trip was made in 1938 or 39. In 1941 an article telling of his life in Grouse Creek, 
Utah, and Idaho and announcing his death at age 1 12 years appeared in the church section of the 
Deseret News. Our visit stands out today in 1971 as one of the choicest and faith promoting 
experiences of my life. It increased my testimony of the divinity of our church. How important 
and dear the principles of the gospel were to the worn, weary body and soul of Indian Jack, even 
after a long, long period of inactivity. Our gospel is indeed a "Pearl of Great Price!" Indian Jack 
knew it too! How important it is to remain true and faithful and endure to the end. 

Written by Opal Weekes Clements 



351 



INDIAN JACK OF GROUSE CREEK SHOSHONE TRIBE 

Grouse Creek Jack is a good Indian, 108 years old and in good health, the 
editor of the Power County Press at American Falls, Idaho, recently headlined. 

Grouse Creek Jack attended Sunday School in American Falls a few 
weeks ago. Bishop Vard W. Meadows reported. There, with face wrinkled by the 
blast of the desert sun and the passing of many winters, his frame bent by the 
weight of time, the Indian's clear eyes sparkled when he was asked to talk to the 
congregation. 

He said he was a good Indian since joining the Church many years ago. 
He told the American Falls members that he liked The Book of Mormon, saying, 
"Good Indian baptized die, put in ground, come up, go into clouds young man, 
white, feel good. Bad Indian, no baptized, die put in ground, stay there." 

Grouse Creek Jack was born and lived a long time at Grouse Creek, Utah. 
It is not known whether the creek was named for Jack or Jack for the creek, but 
his age which the Church records indicate is 108, would place the name of the 
creek after Jack. 

Grouse Creek Jack says he well remembers when Brigham Young came to 
the Great Salt Lake Valley. He has a remarkable memory that would be the envy 
of a man 75 years old. He recalled the name of persons he had not seen for 50 or 
60 years. He remembered their first names and could speak of their son, proving 
that he really remembered the person. 

The Indian told Roy Lindley of American Falls, that he worked on the 
Logan Temple, carrying mortar and plaster up the scaffolds. After its 
construction he was baptized and married there. 

Here's the way Grouse Creek Jack told his story, using sometimes "he" 
for "me", yet giving a clear picture of his early life and conversion to the Church. 

"Hunted with bow and arrow, later made own arrows. Had no potatoes, 
no apples, nothing much to eat but meat, wild berries and the grain and wild grass 
(rye) used in making mush and soup. Remember long time ago, Father told how 
he used to hide by the water hole and shoot buffalo with bow and arrow or spear 
them as they ran by hiding place." He said when he was about 15 years old he 
met Brigham Young for the first time in Salt Lake City. He said Brigham come 
with hands held up. "Me don't know what he meant, maybe pray. After some 
time all come. When first come see white man, me pretty much coward. Hide in 
brush maybe so after while white man leave." He said, "me kill deer, sometime 
maybe go, shoot elk which are stuck in snow drift. Pretty soon me no afraid of 
white man. We old folks been living here at Grouse Creek long time." 

"Married in Logan Temple, baptized in Logan Temple, my wife, me. Met 
all Bishops, Salt Lake, Price, Pocatello, Logan, all over. 

"Brigham Young came over no Indian Bishop help me but Book of 
Mormon Bishop did. Indian Bishop no let me work I eat good I don't know what 
matter. My head is all right, my heard is all right. Book of Mormon help me. 
That's all I want now, I feel good. That way Book of Mormon help care me, he 
care me. He all right Book of Mormon help me in anything and everything. 
That's all I want today. 



352 



"I used to play cards, gamble and drink moonshine and whiskey and 
smoke. So me thing came to him from up above and told him to stop and go and 
be baptized. If baptized he go up instead of down, go up in the sky and feel 
good." He went to Logan and was baptized, and quit smoking and drinking. Man 
feel good. That is opinion on resurrection." 

"He first saw Brigham Young at the same place, Salt Lake City is today. 
At first only a few houses now lots and lots houses. Too many. 

"He ate game, any kind, squirrel, wild cat, badger, salmon, fish, rabbit, 
dried fish brought back home. Pine nuts, dry chokecherries and service berries. 
Take seed of sunflower and grind it and make mush. 

"Hunt buffalo, dig hole in ground and hide in it and cover it up with sage 
brush so the buffalo can't see him. Bow and arrow didn't make any noise when 
shot, but rifle make big noise. 

"Made shirts, pants and moccasins of buckskin. Made fire by rubbing two 
sticks of wood together. Red pine was best to make fire because was hardest 
wood. 

"At first there weren't many rabbits and now they all over. 

"Grouse Creek Jack belonged to the Shoshone Tribe." 

"Book of Mormon say one time Indian all white and will be again in long 
time. He feels good for being baptized and a member of the Church today." 

He lived to the age of 112 years. His death was reported in the church 
section of the Deseret News, Saturday, February 15, 1945. It included a very 
good picture of Indian Jack dressed in a dark overcoat, tie showing and white hair 
well combed, with a very intelligent look in his eyes. He was a fine looking man. 

Indian Jack was born in 1833, died in 1945. 

Indian Jack spoke at Sunday School in American Falls, Idaho in 1941 
when he was 108 years old. 

Clipped from the Deseret News Church Section 
Submitted by Opal Clements 



353 



INDIAN JACK STORIES 

Indian Jack Stories written by Opal W. Clements as told by her mother and her uncles 
Elisha and Marshall Grover. My grandfather was asked by authorities of the LDS Church to go 
from Grantsville to Grouse Creek to supervise the Indians on the Reservation there and teach 
them a better way of life. Indian Jack was one of the older Indians and more responsive to 
Grandfather's teachings. 

Indian Jack was living in the mountains when his wife Annie passed away. He cut poles, 
lashed them together, fastened a blanket on them and then laid his squaw's body on them and 
brought it out of the mountains on the poles drawn by a horse. Relief Society Sisters prepared 
her body for burial and an LDS service was held for her. 

Grandfather was awakened during the night one time. He arose to find Indian Jack at the 
door. He told grandfather he'd had two dreams and wanted them interpreted. He had full 
confidence in grandfather and felt nothing was impossible for him to do. 

While at Grouse Creek grandfather lived in a white sand stone house. He was awakened 
one night by shouts and laughter from the Indians. He arose to quiet them and discovered the 
Indians had driven into the corner of the house. It was a difficult thing to move the wagon so 
grandfather unhooked the horses and tried to send the Indians home. They insisted on staying so 
rolled up in their blankets and slept till morning. 

With his allotment Indian Jack had purchased a new wagon and taken his wives to Salt 
Lake City. They returned completely fitted in brightly colored clothes. Jack wore a new suit 
high boots and a large hat. Grandfather saw them approaching and stepped back a step or two 
and whistled as though he were surprised. Jack spoke saying "what's matter Marsh, you have 
money, you get some." 

The Indians came often and loved to eat out at our house after meeting on Sunday. We 
had from five to thirteen of them, self invited, for dinner which mother usually served out of 
doors. They were made welcome and ate as often as they chose to come. 

It was a common thing among the Indians to name papooses after presidents of the 
United States. The names Garfield and Grant were used often. One old Indian was named 
Plodich (?) another Jake and another Poker Johnny because he spent so much time playing poker. 

Father was away one night (he hauled freight from Nevada). Mother heard a knock at the 
door and arose to answer it. Poker Johnny and a friend greeted her. They had been drinking and 
the effects hadn't completely disappeared. They insisted on coming in the house for supper. 
Mother said. "Go on home Johnny, it's late. I've been in bed and I am tired and sleepy." 
"Friend live long way, he's hungry, wants good dinner, potatoes, meat and coffee." No 
persuasion could change his mind so mother prepared the meal while they waited. She said 
Johnny really wasn't hungry and ate only a little food but his friend ate heartily enjoying every 
bite of his food. When they'd finished Johnny laid $5.00 and a beautiful silk muffler on the 
table. Mother told him she didn't want either. "It's all right." She said they thanked her and 
walked out. 

Written by Opal Weekes Clements 



354 



Robert Weekes 



& 



Mary Ann Baldry 



Family 



8&9 



355 



356 



Family Group Record- 2131 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Robert WEEKES-6 130 




Bom 27 Mar 1790 


Place Bexley, Wellinq, Kent, Enqland 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 26 Jan 1853 




Died 14 Sep 1853 


Place Fort Bridqer, Wvominq 


Endowed 24 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 


Buried 14 Sep 1853 ! Place Fort Bridqer, Wvominq 


SealPar 




Mamed 3 Auq 1818 I Place Dartford, Kent, England 


seaisp 24 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 


Husband's father William, WEEKES-61 53 MRIN: 2138 




Husband-smother Sarah HIBBINS-61 54 


Wife 




Bom 2 Dec 1799 


Place Thelnethamj SuffolkJEngJand 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr 11 Dec 1799 


Place Thelnetham, Suffolk, England 


Baptized 19 Aug 1849 






Died 26 Oct 1888 


Place Smithfield, Cache, UT 


Endowed 24 Nov 1862 






Buried 29 Oct 1888 


place Smithfield. Cache. UT 


SealPar 15 Apr 1927 


LOGAN 


wrfes father James BALDRY-6160 mrin 2139 


Wife's mother Elizabeth HALL-6 1 6 1 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


M 


Robert WEEKES JR.-6132 




Bom 19 Jul 1819 


Place Bexley, Wellinq, Kent, Enq 


Baptized 4 Sep 1879 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 24 Sep 1884 




Died 20 Auq 1883 


Place 


SealPar 25 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse Sarah PARSONS-6269 mrin: 2140 


Married 13 Nov 1842 I Place Bexlev. Kent, Ena I seaisp 19 Jan 1973 i ARIZO 


M 


John WEEKES-61 33 




Bom 28 Oct 1821 | Pfece Bexley, Wellinq. Kent, Enq 


Baptized 6 Dec 1892 




Chr. Place 


Endowed 9Dec1892 




Died 6 Jan 1890 


Place Belle Grove, East Wickham, Kent, Enqland 


SealPar 29 Oct 1895 


TbGAN 


Buried 


Place 


spouse Mrs. Elizabeth WEEKES-6270 mrin: 2141 


Married | Place J SeaISp 


spouse Catherine -6271 mrin: 2142 




Married [ Place | SeaISp 


F 


Elizabeth WEEKES-* 


3134 




Bom 1 Mav 1824 


Place Bexlev, Wellinq, Kent, Enq 


Baptized 13 Aug 1849 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 14 Aug 1884 




Died 14 Nov 1865 


piace Australia 


SealPar 25 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 


Buried 


Place 


Spouse John HEATH-6272 mrin: 2143 


Married 31 Jan 1847 


Place Bexlev. Kent. England | Seaisp 


F 


Mary Ann WEEKES- 


6135 




Bom 26 Aug 1826 


Place Bexley, Welling, Kent, England 


Baptized 13 Aug 1849 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 15 0ct1864 




Died 15 Sep 1885 


Place Smithfield, Cache, UT 


SealPar 25 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 


Buried Sep 1885 


place Smithfield. Cache, UT 


spouse Charles JONES-6273 mrin 2144 


Mamed 20 Sep 1846 I Place Bexlev Parish, Wellinq, Kent. England I Seaisp 15 Oct 1864 I 


M 


Samuel WEEKES-61 36 




Bom 12 Apr 1829 


Place Bexley, Kent, Enqland 


Baptized 1 Sep 1850 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 14 Jan 1865 


EHOUS 


Died 17 Mar 1891/1892 Place Lyman, Fremont, ID 


SealPar 


SEP 


Buried Mar 1891/1892 


Place Archer. Fremont, ID 


spouse Mary Eliza SAWYER-6274 mrin: 2145 


Mamed 4 Jan 1850 ! Place Kent, England I seaisp 14 Jan 1865 1 EHOUS 


spouse Sarah ERICKSON-6275 mrin: 2146 


Married 30 Mar 1867 i Place f SeaISp 


F 


Eunice WEEKES-6 137 




Bom 14 Oct 1831 


Place East Wickham, Welling, Kent, Eng 


Baptized Child | 


Chr. 13 Nov 1831 


piace East Wickham, Welling, Kent. Enqland 


Endowed Child 


Died 4 Feb 1834 


Place East Wickham, Kent, England 


SealPar 25 Sep 1884 LOGAN 


Buried 9 Feb 1834 


piace East Wickham, Kent. Enqland 


Prepared by £ ar 1 Nykamp 


Address 14054 N. 65 E. 


Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls. Idaho 83401 


E-maii address carl@srv.myrf.net 




Date prepared 29 May 2006 


United States Of America 



357 









Family Group Record- 2131 






Page 2 of 2 




Husband Robert WEEKES-61 30 




wife Mary Ann BALDRY OR BAULDR-6131 




■ - - 

Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


6 


F 


Eunice WEEKES-61 37 






Spouse 




Married [ Place 


SeaISp 




7 


M il 






Bom 16 Feb 1834 Place Bexlev. Wellinq, Kent, Enq 


Baptized 


Jan 1851 








Chr. 14 Oct 1834 Place Wellinq. Kent, Enqland 


Endowed 


25 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 






Died 13Jun1852 

Buried 


Place Drowned While, Crossinq The, Platte River 


SealPar 


25 Sep 1884 


LOGAN 




Place On The Plains 










Spouse 




Married ! Place 


SeaISp 


i 


8 


M 


David WEEKES-61 39 






Bom 9 Jul 1836 Place Wellinq. Kent, Enqland 


Baptized 






chr 7 Aug 1836 


Place 


Endowed 


7 Dec 1861 






Died 16 May 1902 


Place Smithfield, Cache, UT 


SealPar 


25 Sep 1884J LOGAN 




Buned Mav 1902 


Place Smithfield, Cache, UT 




spouse Hannah RICHES-6276 




MRIN: 2147 




Married 7 Dec 1861 ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. UT 


SeaISp 


7 Dec 1861 ! EHOUS 


9 


F 


Edith WEEKS-6140 






Bom 12 Dec 1838 Place Wellinq, Kent, Enqland 


Baptized 


27 Dec 1849 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


18 Apr 1856 






Died 23 Jan 1918 Place Smithfield, Cache, UT 


SealPar 


29 Oct 1895 


, LOGAN 




Buried Jan 1918 ! Place Smithfield, Cache. UT 




spouse William COLEMAN-6277 






MRIN: 2148 




Married 10 Oct 1864 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, UT 


SeaISp 


10 Oct 1864 


EHOUS 


10 


M 


Sidney WEEKES-61 23 


< 


* 


Bom 8 Mar 1842 I Place Bexley, Kent, Enqland 


Baptized 


3 Dec 1851 






W 10 May 1842 Place Bexley, Wallinq, Kent, Enqland 


Endowed 


24 Nov 1862 


[EHOUS 




Died 14 Apr 1909 Place Sunnydell, Fremont, ID 


SealPar 


22 Jul 1885 


LOGAN 




Buried 16 Apr 1909 'Place Archer. Fremont, ID 








spouse Susan Elizabeth PILGRIM-6124 




MRIN: 2121 




Mamed 16 Jul 1864 I Place (End. Hs) Salt L, Salt Lake, UT 


SeaISp 


16 Jul 1864! EHOUS 




spouse Annie Bennet HARRIS-6263 




MRIN: 2130 




Married 4 Oct 1878 I Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake. UT 


SeaISp 


I 


11 


F 


Emma WEEKES-61 4 


H 






Bom 18 Apr 1846 


Place Bexley Wellinq, Kent, Enqland 


Baptized 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


24 Nov 1862 I EHOUS 




Died 22 Mar 1903 


Place Smithfield, Cache. UT 


SealPar 


29 Oct 1895 I LOGAN 




Buried Mar 1903 


Place Smithfield. Cache. UT 








Spouse Joseph FORRESTER-6278 




MRIN: 2149 




Married 24 Nov 1862 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Nov 1862! EHOUS 



358 




Robert Weekes 




Mary Ann Baldry 



^m 




359 



ROBERT WEEKES AND MARY ANN BALDRY 

The history of Kent is probably more varied and interesting, more exciting and 
entertaining, than any other county in England. It was in Kent that Christianity was first 
introduced. Kent was the place where invaders from the Continent always landed. The Romans 
landed in Kent, the Jutes landed in Kent-and the country is, largely, the history of two ancient 
highways, Watling Street and the Pilgrim's Way. Two roads which are almost as old as the 
history of England; two roads, could tell of Ancient Britons and Legions, Pilgrims and traders, 
adventurers and merchants, rebels and the armies of Kings, historians and holiday makers! Kent 
has often been called the Garden Spot of England because of the wonderful shrubs, flowers, 
trees, vines and vegetables, which grow and thrive there so abundantly. 

In this county, not far from the outskirts of London, in the Parish of Bexley, Robert 
Weekes, the fourth child of the family of William and Sarah Hibbens Weekes, was christened on 
the 27th of March 1790. Of his childhood nothing is known to me. The next event which pertains 
to his history was recorded in the Dartford, Kent Parish register. That entry was his marriage to 
Mary Ann Baldry on 3 August, 1818. She was the daughter of James Baldry and Elizabeth Hall 
of East Wickham and Bexley, Kent. 

This couple settled down to make their home in East Wickham, where eight children 
were born to them. The order of their births is as follows: Robert, John, Elizabeth, Mary Ann, 
Eunice, Samuel, Eunice and Benjamin. Later this family moved to Bexley where four other 
children were added to their family: David, Edith, Sidney and Emma. The two daughters named 
Eunice died in early infancy, but of John I am not sure what happened to him. Some records of 
the family state that he died at the age of 9 years. 

The Census of England, taken March 30, 1851 at House No. 27 of Welling, Kent which 
was the home of Charles Jones and Mary Ann Weekes Jones, daughter of Robert and Mary Ann 
Weekes, records this family as follows: 

Mary A wife 24 years Born at Bexley 

2 years Born at Bexley 

3 months Born at Bexley 

30 years 

50 years (Wife of Robert, our ancestor) 

The same 1851 Census taken at the home of John Heath and Elizabeth Weekes (Daughter of 
Robert) 



Jane 


dau. 


Charles 


son 


John Weekes 


visitor 


Ann Mary 


visitor 



John Heath 


Head 


27 years 


Born at East Wickham 


Elizabeth 


Wife 


26 


Born at Bexley 


John Heath 


Son 


3 


Born at Bexley 


Mary Ann 


dau. 


8 mo. 


Born at East Bexley 


Joseph Lewis 


Lodger 


17 




Benjamin Weekes 


Lodger 


17 




William Miller 


Lodger 


22 





360 



The 1 85 1 Census in the home of Robert and Mary Ann Baldry Weekes at House #70, Dover 
Road: 



Robert Weekes 


Head 


60 


Welling 


Cow Keeper 


Absent 


Wife 








Samuel 


Son 


21 


Welling 


Cow dealer 


Daniel or David 


Son 


14 


Welling 


Milk boy 


Edith 


Dau. 


12 


Welling 


Scholar 


Sidney 


Son 


8 


Welling 


(My Grandfather) 


Emma 


Dau 


4 


Welling 




Mary Jane 


Gr. Dau. 









Notice that (our ancestor), Mary Ann Baldry Weekes, was at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Charles Jones, and there was a John Weekes present with her who was 30 
years old in 1851 which would place his birth in the year 1821 which agrees with the date of 
birth of the John, son of Robert and Mary Ann. I am still doing more research on John. 

Mary Ann, Robert's wife, was a spiritual minded woman who readily accepted the 
message of the Restored Gospel when it was presented to her. She was baptized on 19 
August 1849 in the Welling Branch of the London Conference. Her son David was baptized 
the same day. Robert did not accept baptism until about four years later, on 26 January 1853, 
just about a month prior to their emigration to Utah. 

The first members of this family to leave England were their sons Samuel and 
Benjamin in company with Charles Jones, their brother-in-law. These three men sailed on the 
"Ellen Maria" from Liverpool in Feb. of 1852. After eight weeks at sea, they landed at New 
Orleans, continuing up the Mississippi River by river steamer to St. Louis, Missouri. There 
they were met by Elder Abraham Smoot who acted as the Agent for the Perpetual 
Immigration Fund Saints, which numbered 182, and purchased supplies for the company 
while in route to Utah by wagon train. Elder Smoot conducted the Saints to Council Bluffs 
and then led the First Perpetual Immigration Fund Saints across the plains. 

Samuel remained in New Orleans, but Benjamin and Charles continued on with the 
immigrant company, which consisted of 31 wagons. However, Charles was the only one who 
reached Utah that year. Benjamin was accidentally drowned while crossing the Piatt River, 
on 18 June 1852, and was placed in a lonely grave near one of the river crossings. 

Upon arrival in Utah, Charles Jones prepared a suitable home in which to receive his 
family who had been left in England, and were to join him the next year. 

On the 3rd of Sept. 1853, he learned that the company his family was traveling with 
was approaching Immigration Canyon. This happy man prepared a meal (being a cook by 
trade) and went to meet them on foot. His wife was carrying her 21/2 year old in her arms 
near one of the wagons, while her two little girls were holding to her skirts, one on each side. 
This was a happy family. They were together on the 3 Sept. 1853, their seventh wedding 
anniversary. 

Robert Weekes was reluctant to leave England. His health was not the best, but his 
wife and family were so anxious to emigrate and join the main body of the Saints in the 
valley of the Great Salt Lake. 

On 28 Feb. 1853, Robert Weekes, with his wife, Mary Ann. and the four youngest 
children: David, Edith, Sidney, and Emma, set sail on board the good ship "International" 



361 



from Liverpool, under the Presidency of Christopher Arthur, arriving at New Orleans, 
Louisiana on 23 April in good shape. Then they sailed up the Mississippi River with the 
eleventh company of Perpetual Fund Immigration Saints, by river steamer to Keokuk, Iowa, 
then overland to Council Bluffs by wagon train. From Council Bluffs they were led to the 
valley of the Great Salt Lake. 

The adults were required to walk much of the time, and Robert did travel many miles 
on foot, but as time went on, his strength failed and he was placed in a wagon, where he 
rested his head on a pillow in his little daughter's lap to ease the pain in his head caused by 
the constant jolting of the wagon. He passed away 14 September 1853, and was laid to rest in 
a grave along the trail, near Fort Bridger, Wyoming. 

Robert's brave wife, Mary Ann, and her four fatherless children continued on with the 
wagon train, reaching Salt Lake in October. They went for a short time to live in Lehi, Utah 
but later moved to Smithfield, Cache County, Utah where they made their permanent home, 
and where many of their descendants now live. 

Written by a great-granddaughter, Beatrice Munns H. Hansen (1965) 




Bexley Church in East Wickham, Kent, England 
Robert Weekes was christened in this church. 
Robert Weekes and his wife Mary Ann Baldry 
attended church here. 



362 



MARY ANN BALDRY WEEKES 

Mary Ann, the first child in the family of James and Elizabeth Hall Baldry was born 2 
December 1799 in the town of Thelnetham, Suffolk, England, and was christened there in the 
parish of St. Nicholas on 1 1 December 1799. 

Thelnetham is a parish on the Little Ouse River, which here separates Suffolk from 
Norfolk, 4 miles N.W. of Botesdale, 7 l / 2 miles S. of Harling Road Station, 8 l / 2 miles S.W. of 
Diss and 11 miles S.E. of Thotford - population in 1901, 615. It comprises 1,773 acres. The 
Church St. Nicholas is a fine flint building of the decorated period. The chancel has a fine east 
window of five lights. There is a good chancel arch. On the south wall is a monument of 
alabaster and marble to members of the Bokenham family of this place, dated 1048. In the mave 
is an inscription, on a mural of brass, to Anne Caly of 1500. There is an ancient octagonal font. 
The embattled western tower contains five bells. The western window is perpendicular, over it 
being a decorated niche. This parish was named after the Thelnetham family who lived there 
during the reign of Henry III. 1826-1877. The Parish Register of Thelnetham begins with the 
year 1538. Charity lands produce about twenty pounds yearly, given to the poor. 

Sometime between 1805 and 1809, James and his family moved from Thelnetham, 
Suffolk to East Wickham, Kent where two other children were born and christened as follows: 
Eliza, Chr. 29 Oct. 1 809, Hannah. Chr. 8 Dec. 1811, but both of these daughters died as very 
young children and were buried at Bexley, Kent. 

The change of residence from Suffolk to Kent has proceeded to be a great problem to us. 
No records have been found among any of the descendants of Mary Ann as to which of the over 
521 parishes in the county of Suffolk she came from. As a result, quite a sum of money has been 
spent searching even in the county of Kent. Mary Ann and her husband were married at Dartford, 
Kent, on 3 Aug. 1818. 

Mary Ann's mother, Elizabeth Hall Baldry, was born at Bexley, Kent, and was 8 years 
older than her husband. We know nothing of how they met or very little about them, probably 
due to the fact that a great percent of the people in England in those days were unable to write 
and no record of the family was kept. I am at a loss to see why her name has been so long given 
as Ann Mary instead of Mary Ann as it was recorded in the parish register where her christening 
appeared, or why the old Branch Records of the Welling Branch of the London Conference gives 
her birth date as Dec. 1799. Her index card has her birth only as 1 Dec. 1799, and her tombstone 
gives it as only 1800. So, we have had a real struggle to find her exact date of birth, and parish in 
Suffolk in which she was born and christened. 

The Genealogical Society told us in 1956 that it would cost us about $2.00 to search each 
of the parishes in Suffolk for the period of time which would find her, and that amount of money 
which it would cost would be well over $1,000. But, luckily for us, we found the Will of Mary 
Ann's grandfather, Joseph Baldry, which had the Thelnetham parish as his place of residence and 
the Will made mention of his son James of Welling, Kent. So a researcher was located in 
England who soon sent the following entries taken from the Parish Register of Thelnetham: 

1778 Sept. 1st James, son of Joseph and Mary Baldry 

1799 Dec. 1 1 Mary Ann, daughter of James and Elizabeth Hall Baldry 
(Chr.) 1805 Dec. 3 Sarah, daughter of James and Elizabeth Hall Baldry 
(Chr.) 1802 Oct. 10 Phillip, son of James and Elizabeth Hall Baldry 



363 



And later, Mary Ann's birth date was sent as 2 Dec. 1799 at Thelnetham, Suffolk. The 
fours above the last entry were all christening dates, or, sometimes called baptisms. The names, 
baptisms, burial days and some marriages of the second family of our ancestor were all given. 
Joseph's last wife was named Mary Hart. 

The detailed information given above I felt was necessary to help clear up some of the 
misleading information concerning the dates and places of the origin of our wonderful pioneer 
emigrant who was instrumental in bringing some of her family to Utah where they could be with 
the main body of the Church, and enjoy more freedom and a better way of life than was possible 
in England. 

Mary Ann was seven or eight years of age when her father moved his family from 
Thelnetham, Suffolk to Bexley and East Wickham, Kent. It was in the parish of Bexley that his 
wife Elizabeth was born and christened 23 Dec. 1770. She was the daughter of Ambrose and 
Mary Adams Hall. 

Of Mary Ann's early life, nothing is known to me until her marriage to Robert Weekes of 
Bexley, Kent, the son of William Weekes and Sarah Hibbins, on 3 Aug. 1818, at Dartford, Kent. 
A year later we find that they were living at East Wickham, Kent, where the following children 
were born to them: Robert, born 19 July 1819; John, in 1821; Elizabeth, 1 May 1824; Mary Ann, 
26 Aug. 1826, Eunice, 1827 who died as an infant; Samuel, 12 Apr. 1829; Eunice, 1831 also 
died in infancy; Benjamin, 16 Feb. 1834. The family then moved to Bexley and the last four 
children were born to them as follows: David, 9 July 1836, Edith, 12 Dec. 1838; Sidney, 8 March 
1841; Emma, 18 April 1846. 

Kent is a very beautiful place, suitable to the growth of flowers, shrubs, trees and 
gardens. It has been called The Garden Spot of England'. Some of the finest fruit grown in 
England is grown near Dartford at South Fleet, Sutton— at Home and Faraingham. 

Hops have been grown in England for the last four hundred years. The sight of the hop 
gardens with their orderly rows of growing vines is a never failing source of interest to visitors. 
During the harvest season (about the last week in August to the third week in September) the 
gardens are hives of activity, and many of the hop-pickers regard it as a profitable holiday. It is 
very probable that Mary Ann and Robert, and some of their oldest children, at times worked in 
the hop fields. 

The Census of England and Wales for 1851 gives one the impression that this family 
lived in the country on a farm. They are listed as living in house No. 70 on Dover Road, Welling, 
Kent, England. Robert (Mary Ann's husband) was recorded as being 60 years of age and his 
occupation as cow keeper. Mary Ann was not at home that evening, but is listed as a visitor in 
the home of her daughter, Mary Ann, who married Charles Jones. In the Charles Jones home that 
evening there was also another visitor named John Weekes, listed as being age 30 years. I have 
wondered if this is the 2nd son of Robert and Mary Ann. I am trying to find more information on 
this son. Some records of the family state that he died at the age of 9 years, while others list his 
death as 1880. John, the second son, was born in the year 1821, which would make him age 30 
when this Census was taken. Samuel, the third son, was listed as being a dealer of cows, while 
another son, David, was given as a milk boy. 

Life was hard for the working class of people with a large family in England in those 
days. Drinking was wide spread due to the drinks manufactured in which the hops were used. 
Many of the farmers had malting offices on the side. In this environment, Mary Ann was a great 
source of strength to her husband and family; economically, morally and spiritually. Indeed, she 
seems to have been the more prominent one in the leadership of her family. It was she who first 



364 



accepted the message of the Restored Gospel, when it was brought to her attention, and went 
gladly into the waters of baptism on the 19 Aug. 1849 in the Welling Branch of the London 
Conference. Her son David was baptized on the same day. 

During the next few years, some of the oldest children were baptized and soon began to 
think of emigration to Utah. Charles Jones (husband of Mary Ann Weekes) and Benjamin 
Weekes were the first members of this family to leave England, going on board the sailing ship 
"Ellen Maria" from Liverpool 7 Feb. 1852. They purchased supplies for the Saints to emigrate to 
Utah. Elder Smoot conducted them to Council Bluffs, and then led them (The first British 
Perpetual Emigration Saints, consisting of those who had crossed the Atlantic in both the 
"Kennebec'"' and the "Ellen Maria") across the plains. 

Samuel remained in New Orleans. Benjamin continued on with the Saints in company of 
his brother-in-law, Charles Jones, but Benjamin never did reach Utah. For him, the end of the 
journey came at one of the crossings of the Platte River. He was accidentally drowned and 
placed in a lonely grave nearby. 

In February of the following year, Mary Ann, her husband, and the four youngest 
children, David, Edith, Sidney and Emma set sail 28 Feb. 1853 from the port of Liverpool on 
board the good ship "International", arriving at New Orleans on 23 April. During the trip there 
were 7 births, 7 deaths and 5 marriages on the ship. 

The saints organized into groups. Meetings were held where they enjoyed singing hymns, 
worshipping God and giving thanks for His many blessings. Parties were held, and the Captain 
was most kind and thoughtful of the welfare of the passengers during their long sea voyage. 

The following account of the voyage was given by Christopher Arthur in a letter to 
Samuel Richards: "Never, I believe, since the days of Old King Noah until the present time, 
emigration had a more respectable company of Saints that crossed the Great Deluge of Waters to 
be freed of Babylon's corruption than sailed in the 'International'. 

"There were 48 members in this group; indeed their good Captain was baptized while 
they were on the high seas. Strong winds tossed them around on the waves, and at times almost 
turned them over in the sea. At one time, the ship was faced with strong head winds for nine 
days, but they reached the mouth of the Mississippi River sailing mostly at the rate of 224 miles 
per 24 hours." 

The 'International' reached New Orleans 23 April 1853, in good shape. Then they were 
sent by River Steamer up the Mississippi River to Keokuk, Iowa. By wagon train, they traveled 
to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where they were later fitted out with forty wagons for the journey to the 
Valley of the Great Salt Lake. 

The able-bodied adults and older children walked part of the time, but for Robert 
Weekes, this was a trip to test his endurance. He was not anxious to begin this journey to Utah, 
and was hesitant to be baptized until about a month before this trip was begun. His health began 
to fail rapidly and he could no longer follow his companions. Finally, he was allowed to ride in 
one of the wagons, resting his head on a pillow in his little daughter's lap to relieve the pain in 
his head caused by the constant jolting of the wagon over the rough roads. Finally, he passed 
away near Ft. Bridger, Wyoming and was laid to rest there along the trail on 14 Sept. 1853. 

Mary Ann and four fatherless children continued on with the company, arriving at Salt 
Lake City the later part of September, or early part of October. They were sent to Lehi, Utah, an 
English settlement, and a little later were sent to Smithfield, Cache, Utah where they made a 
permanent home. 



365 



In this settlement, this brave, courageous woman struggled heroically to support her little 
family. Many things were strange to these emigrants; at times food was short due to the 
grasshoppers, drought, etc., and they were obliged to gather pig weeds, and dig Sego Lily bulbs 
which made a tasty dish. They also hunted the wild berries. 

Mary Ann was fond of tea and brought enough with her from England to last until it 
could be purchased in Utah. She was very generous with it in case of illness, but did not sell any 
of it. She also brought some nice articles of clothing and other things to be used in the home. 

Several years after Mary Ann and her children arrived in Utah, her son Samuel (in 
Florence, Nebraska) wanted to come west to join his mother and brothers and sisters in Utah. 
Sidney was chosen to make the trip back there to bring his brother and family to the West. 
Sidney drove a covered wagon with a company of men who were driving back there for supplies. 
His mother made a pair of trousers for him to wear on this journey, which were made from the 
best pieces of other worn out trousers. As he was still a growing boy, he naturally grew taller and 
put on some weight. He was a funny sight to see upon his return, and his mother and sisters shed 
a few tears of both joy and sorrow at the state of his clothes, and his safe return to them. 

Samuel and family came from Nebraska to Smithfield, but later moved to Lyman, 
Bingham, Idaho, making their home just a little east of the store in Archer and just adjoining the 
old Charles Briggs home. The fifth child of Samuel Weekes and Mary Ann Gerber was named in 
honor of his brother who was instrumental in getting the family to the west. This child was 
named Lorenzo Sidney. 

When David Weekes grew to maturity, he built a home for his family on the southeast 
corner of the block. His brother Sidney's home was about the center of the block facing south, 
and between these two houses was built a home for his mother. Mary Ann lived in this home 
near her two sons for many years. She was industrious and independent in spirit. She had 
prepared her burial clothes many years before her death, and with them had laid away a twenty 
dollar gold piece to help pay for her burial expense. With the passing time, the clothes had 
become yellow with age, so another suit of clothes was provided for this occasion. She died 26 
Oct. 1888 at Smithfield, Cache, Utah and was buried in the city cemetery, near one of her great- 
grandsons, Frank Winn. 

There is a legend in the Weekes family to the effect that Mary Ann's ancestors were quite 
well fixed financially. The finding of the will of Joseph Baldry (her grandfather) at the West 
Suffolk Record Office in June of 1 954, which was proved May 1 829 in the Archdeaconry Court 
of Sudbury located at Bury, Suffolk, St. Edmunds, supports the truthfulness of this legend. He 
was a farmer, living in Thelnetham, who owned three cottages, which he rented in Palgrave, 
Suffolk, as well as stock, farming implements, corn, furniture, etc. He left 5 or 10 pounds to each 
of his 1 1 living children after a mortgage in the sum of 100 pounds plus interest was paid to Mr. 
Taylor and Mr. Brown. 

Besides the things mentioned above, he bequeathed other items to his present wife, Mary 
Hart Baldry. Later, the Will of Mary Ann's great grandfather, John Baldry of Botesdale, was 
located in the same court and had been proved in July of 1776. This will stated that he was a 
yeoman, or an independent farmer, and that several of his tenement houses were rented to certain 
persons for so many pounds for the rest of their natural lives, and that they were to keep up these 
places in repair during the time they were living in them. 

He had other property as follows: a malting office with all yards, houses, edifices, 
buildings, barns, stable, yards, orchard, lands, meadows, pastures, feedings, rights of 
commonage, and appurtenances in South Lopham, Norfolk, in the care of his son Joseph. There 



366 



were 670 pounds (which would amount to $3,350) in money left to his survivors. This was quite 
an amount of wealth for one of the middle class farmers there in England in those days. A few 
years ago, 1 ran across an item of interest concerning the English land owners which stated that 
only one person in twenty owned land, and 70 % of those land owners owned less than an acre. 

This sketch was written with the aid of information received from the following sources: 

- Records of Sarah Ann Weekes Munns; records of Elizabeth Weekes Woodruff. 

- A sketch of The Weekes Pioneer, from Viola Weekes Wilcox 

- The Life Story of Charles Jones by Hial Bradford, a great-grandson of Mary Ann. 

- Old Branch Records of the Welling, Kent Branch of the London Conference 

- Census Records of England and Wales on 30 March 1851 

- Guide Book of Dartford Burial District 

- The Wills of Joseph and John Baldry, grandfather and great-grandfather of Mary Ann 

Emigration Records of 1883 at the Church Historian's Office in Salt Lake City 

- A legend in the Weekes family. 

- Article on Thelnetham by H. K. Barker - from "West Suffolk Illustrated. " 

- Parish Register entries of SI. Nichols, Thelnetham, Suffolk, England. 

Written by Beatrice Munns Hathcock Hansen Jan. 1965 



367 




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1 — 


Bom 23 Apr 1 797 I Place Great Chesterfor, Essex, England 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


! 

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chr 23 Apr 1797 j Place Great Chesterfor, Essex, England. 


Baptized 


23 Oct 1894 | 


Died 4 Feb 1836 | Place EJybath, England 


Endowed 


24 Oct 1894 I LOGAN 


Buried [ Place 


SealPar 




Mamed 11 Dec 1817 i Place Castle Camps, Cambridqe, Enqland. 


SeaISp 


24 Oct 1894 ! LOGAN 


Husband's father Joseph PILGRIM-1213 




MRIN: 489 






Husband's mother Elizabeth LIVERMORE-1 214 






wife Elizabeth (Betsy) COOTE-1 1 86 








Bom 1 7 May 1 794 j Place Castle Camps, Cambridqe, Enqland. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


i 


chr. 21 Auq 1794 Place Castle Camps, Cambridqe, Enqland. 


Baptized 


14 Feb 1888 




Died 30 Mar 1862 Place Cambridqe, Cambridqe, Enqland 


Endowed 


15 Feb 1888 




Buried 30 Nov 1862 I Place Cambridqe. Cambridqe, Enq. land 


SealPar 


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wrfesfather William COOTE-1 21 5 




MRIN: 490 I 






wife-smother Anne DEBNEY-1216 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


i i 
LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


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Joseph PILGRIM-1 1 


B7 i 






Bom 23 Mar 1818 


Place Cambridqe, Cambridqe, Enqland 


Baptized 


Child 




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chr 22 Mar 1818 


Place Cambridqe, Cmbridqe, Enqland. 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 


Place 


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24 Oct 1894 




Buried 


Place 


spouse Unmarried -7315 




MRIN: 586 J 






Married I Place 


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George Frederick PILGRIM-1 188 






Bom 1 May 1820 I Place Cambridqe, Cambridgeshire, Enqland 


Baptized 


29 Oct 1895 






Chr. 1 May 1820 j Place Cambridqe, Cmbrridqeshire, Enqland 


Endowed 


31 Oct 1895 








Died 2 Jul 1834 Place 


SealPar 


24 Oct 1894 








Buried ! Place 






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Spouse 






Married | Place J SeaISp 


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Mary Ann Maria PILGRIM-1 189 






Bom 18Jun1822 


Place Cambridge, Cmbridqeshire, Enqland 


Baptized 


10ApM917 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


21 Mar 1918 




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Died 


Place 


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24 Oct 1894 




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spouse William MANSFIELD-1 320 




MRIN 491 




Mamed 15 Apr 1865 i Place 


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Elizabeth PILGRIM-1 


190 






Bom 12 Mar 1824 


Place Cambridge, Cmbridqeshire, Enqland 


Baptized 


Child 




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Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




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Died 23 Sep 1827 


Place 


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24 Oct 1894 






Buried 


Place 






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Rebecca PILGRIM-1 191 




Bom 1 Jan 1826 j Place Cambridqe, Cmbridqesjire, Enqland 


Baptized 








Chr. j Place 


Endowed 


26 Apr 1862 






Died 13 Apr 1909 Place Lehi. Utah, Utah 


SealPar 






Buried 21 Apr 1909 Place Lehi, Utah. Utah 




spouse William GOATES-1 321 




MRIN: 492 




Mamed 7 Apr 1857 ! Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


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John PILGRIM-1 192 






Bom 1 Aug 1828 

Chr. 


Place Cambridqe, Cambridgeshire, Enqland 

Place 


Baptized 
Endowed 


22 Mar 1910 






23 Mar 1910 






Died 31 Dec 1905 


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SealPar 


24 Mar 1910 






Buried 


Place 








spouse Catherine ANDREWS-1 322 




MRIN 493 




Married 1858 I Place 


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Address 14054 N 65 E 




Phone 208-523-7328 


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E-mail address carl@srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date prepared 9 Mar 2006 


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Family Group Record- 471 






Page 2 of 2 




Husband Samuel PILGRIM-1 185 




wife Elizabeth (Betsy) COOTE-1 1 86 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates ! Temple 


7 


M 


Swan PILGRIM-1 193 




Bom 21 Jan 1830 I Place Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Enqland 


Baptized 


22 Mar 1910 




! 


Chr. Place 


Endowed 


24 Mar 1910 




Died 1 Jan 1906 | Place 


SealPar 


24 Mar 1910 




Buried j Place 






spouse Alice Cockle MOORE-1323 




MRIN: 494 


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Married 1852 


Place 


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94 


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Bom 22 Oct 1832 


Place Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Enqland 


Baptized 


27 Mar 1851 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16 Jul 1864] 








Died 15Auq1889 


Place Smithfield, Cache, Utah 


SealPar 


24 Oct 1894 I 




Buried 15 Aua 1889 ! Place Smithfield. Cache. Utah 








spouse Annie PEACOCK-1 325 




MRIN: 496 




Married 16 Jul 1864 i Place Smithfield. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


16 Jul 1864 I EHOUS 


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Bom 18 Oct 1833 j Place Cambridqe, Cambridgeshire, Enqland 


Baptized 


6 Jan 1936 1 




Chr. 18 Oct 1833 j Place Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Enqland 


Endowed 


22 Jan 1936 






Died 15Jun1834 j Place 


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24 Oct 1894 j 


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Married j Place 


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£pm 10 Sep 1835 


Place St. Giles, Cambridqe, Cambridge, England 


Baptized 


29 Mar 1851 I 




|Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


16JuM864j EHOUS 


Died 1 Mav 1888 


Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 


SealPar 


24 Oct 1894 I LOGAN 


Buried Mav 1888 Place Smithfield, Cache. Utah 






spouse Sidney WEEKES-1 1 66 






MRIN. 25 






Married 16 Jul 1864 ! Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


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373 



SAMUEL PILGRIM AND BETSY ELIZABETH COOTE 

Samuel was christened 23 April 1797 at Great Chesterford, Essex, England, the son of 
Joseph Pilgrim and Elizabeth Livermore Pilgrim. He married Betsy Elizabeth Coote on 11 
December 1817. She was the oldest daughter of William Coote and Ann Debney. She was born 
21 August 1791 at Castle Camps, Cambs, England. 

Samuel and Betsy were parents of ten children. They were all born at Cambridge, 
Cambridgeshire, England. They were as follows: 

1 . Joseph 23 March 1 8 1 8-He was named after his grandfather, 

Joseph Pilgrim. 

2. George Frederick 1 May 1820-Died 2 July 1834 

3. Mary Ann Maria 18 June 1822-She was named in honor of her Grand- 

Mother, Ann Debney. She married William Mansfield, 
15 April 1865. 

4. Elizabeth 12 March 1824-23 September 1827 She was named 

In honor of her mother, Betsy Elizabeth. She lived 
Only 3 years. 

5. Rebecca 1 January 1825-13 April 1909. She married William 

Goates 7 April 1857 at Salt Lake City, Utah by President 
Brigham Young. 

6. John 1 August 1828-13 December 1905 Married to Catherine 

Andrews. 

7. Swan 21 January 1830-1 January 1906 Married to Alice Cockel. 

8. Thomas 22 October 1 832- 1 899 Married to Annie Peacock. 

9. Elizabeth 1 8 October 1 833- 1 5 June 1 834 Lived about 8 months. 
10. Susan Elizabeth 10 September 1835-1 May 1888 She married Sidney 

Weekes, 16 July 1864 Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Samuel Pilgrim was employed by the owner of a chalk farm. His health was poor and 
he died early in life. Previous to his death, they had lost three children. Their fourth child, 
Elizabeth, named after her mother, Betsy Elizabeth, passed away when she was only three years 
old-in 1827. Their ninth child, also named Elizabeth in honor of her mother after losing the first 
namesake, lived about 8 months and passed away 15 June 1834; very likely of a communicable 
disease. Seventeen days later her fourteen year old brother, George Frederick, died also. 

Betsy Elizabeth was left a widow with seven children to care for. One of her friends was 
instrumental in helping her find work as a laundress for some college students and businessmen 
in Cambridge. Through this work and by the help of the older children the family was provided 
for. Let us remember that there were no automatic washers and irons, no permanent press 
materials in the years that Betsy was rearing her family. Washing was done by scrubbing clothes 
on the board. They were then starched and ironed with flat irons that were heated on the stove. 
I'm sure there was something for every child to do. 

Susan Elizabeth, being ten years younger than her next living sister, Rebecca, was 
allowed to spend some time in the country with her mother's sister, Susan Miller. It is very 
likely that Susan Elizabeth was named in her honor. She was also the third daughter to be named 
Elizabeth after her mother. Betsy must have loved her name Elizabeth. 



374 



We know nothing more than the information listed about the oldest son, Joseph. George 
Frederick lived only fourteen years. Samuel's folks took the oldest daughter, Mary Ann Maria, 
into their home to relieve some of Betsy's expenses. It seems that this daughter was a problem 
to them as she later gave birth to an illegitimate son, whom her sister, Rebecca, took care of. 
Years later, Mary Ann married William Mansfield, a widower, 15 April 1865. He was a 
plasterer by trade. 

Rebecca, the next daughter, was sixteen years old at the time of her father's passing. She 
was a great source of help in maintaining the family, both in the home and with employment 
outside of the home. 

Two infant daughters by the name of Elizabeth died and it seems that the parents were 
determined to have a daughter by the name of Elizabeth, so they named their tenth and last child 
Susan Elizabeth. She lived to be my grandmother. 

The three brothers younger than Rebecca were John, Swan, and Thomas. They had the 
following occupations: John was a shoemaker. Swan was an iron molder, and Thomas was a 
tinner. 

About 1850 the Mormon Elders found their way to the city of Cambridge and drew the 
attention of three children of this family. This brought much heartache and sorrow into Betsy's 
life and home. As a result, the three: Thomas, Rebecca, and Susan Elizabeth were scorned and 
persecuted by their family, but they were undaunted and began to plan to emigrate to the west 
where they could enjoy mingling with the main body of the Church. 

Thomas was the first one to leave England and come to America. He was baptized 27 
March 1 85 1 and became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was 
about nineteen years of age at that time. He began planning for his emigration to America. 
About a year later he sailed on the good ship, ELLEN MARIA, as a member of The Perpetual 
Emigration Company. He sailed from Liverpool, England, with Isaac Haight as company leader 
and the Port of Entry was New Orleans. Three hundred sixty nine persons came in that 
company. After arriving in America he came to Utah and settled in Smithfield. There he 
married Annie Peacock 16 July 1864 in Salt Lake City. On this same day his youngest sister, 
Susan Elizabeth, married Sidney Weekes. Thomas passed away in 1899 at 67 years of age. 

Also passengers on the ship, ELLEN MARIA were Samuel Weekes and his wife, Mary 
Eliza; his brother, Benjamin, and their brother-in-law, Charles Jones, who married their sister, 
Mary Ann Weekes. These members of the Weekes family were from Kent, England, and were 
brothers and sisters of Sidney Weekes, who emigrated to America at the age of twelve years, 20 
February 1853, on the ship, INTERNATIONAL. Sidney Weekes married Susan Pilgrim, 
youngest sister of Thomas in Salt Lake City on July 16, 1864. 

She was baptized in June 1852, just a few months after her brother, Thomas, left for the 
States. Her poor mother was grief stricken and thought that her lot was more than she could 
bear. The loss of her husband, Samuel, and three children, two daughters, Elizabeth, and then 
George Frederick by death seemed a tremendous loss. Now to lose three other children to this 
new religion which would tear them from her and take them to far off America, where she would 
never see them again as long as she lived in mortality—it's no wonder she had bitter feelings 
against the Elders, the Church, and her children. 
I wonder if we would have felt the same feelings of hatred and bitterness. 

When Rebecca had made up her mind to emigrate, she left her work and went to tell her 
mother about her plans, but was denied admission into her home. Her mother was so upset that 
she threw her belongings and a feather tick with a few small coins out of the window, and called 



375 



out to her, "Never spend it until you or your children are crying for bread," or words to that 
effect. This was a sad parting for mother and daughter, who were never to see each other again 
in mortality. 

On 4 May 1 856, Rebecca left her native land and relatives and friends to cast her lot with 
the main body of the Latter Day Saints, in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, on board the ship, 
THORNTON, with a company of emigrants under the care of Elder Levi Savage. They arrived 
at New York 14 June, 1856. 

As early as 1851 the First Presidency suggested the use of hand carts as a means of 
crossing the plains, but it was not until 1856, that the foreign Saints were impressed with this 
mode of travel. Then they took to it with enthusiasm, especially the English Saints. 
They were able to make the trip from Liverpool, to Iowa City, Iowa, for forty five dollars coming 
by way of Boston or New York to Iowa. 

Upon their arrival at Castle Gardens they were put on a train known as THE JERSEY 
CITY and at Toledo, Ohio, they were unkindly treated by the railroad officials, and put to much 
inconvenience. At Iowa City they were met by Daniel Spencer, and welcomed by others. 

Rebecca and her company were assigned to the ill-fated handcart company of James G. 
Willie, which left Iowa City, after a month's delay. This company had 120 hand carts, 6 wagons, 
5 mules, 12 oxen, and 25 tents to accommodate about 500 persons traveling in this company. 

One night part of their oxen stampeded and were lost. Two days were spent hunting for 
them, but not being able to find them, they were replaced with cows from Arkansas and the 
company moved on. 

As they passed through Iowa many of its people made insulting remarks and threatened 
them with violence. 

Many stories were told to these Saints as they traveled toward the West, of the 
unfriendliness of the Indians to the emigrant companies who had preceded them. But this 
company met some Indians in Nebraska, who sold them food and even entertained them. 

Several companies of missionaries passed them on their way to Utah. Franklin Richards 
and Company in three carriages met them on North Bluff Creek. That night they addressed the 
pioneers, giving them much comfort, and Brother Dunbar even sang for them. 

There were many aged people in the company whose carts were made of unseasoned 
wood and needed constant repair, which caused much delay. 

In September, the first frost of the season came, which was a severe one. On September 
30, they reached Fort Laramie, Wyoming, five hundred miles east of Salt Lake. They were short 
of food, some were tired and some were ill, and many were discouraged. They still had a long 
way to go before they were to reach the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. The last rations of food 
were served at the last crossing of the Sweet Water River. 

On October first, Parley P. Pratt, and a company of missionaries met them on their way 
East. Twenty days later the first snow of the season fell, but they were soon met by Cyrus 
Wheelock and Joseph Young and others who told them that relief wagons were on the way to 
relieve them. The next day help arrived as the children were crying for bread. 

From this point they encountered the hardest part of their travel. Their rations were 
growing less and restrictions were placed upon them. What was worse, due to the loss of 
conveyances and the heavy grades they had to climb when they reached the mountains, they had 
to discard a portion of their burdens. Articles of clothing and bedding had to be left on the way 
that progress might be made. Improperly clad and with poor shelter, they were exposed to the 
piercing winds and bitter cold of the early winter storms. 



376 



There was a lot of sickness, diarrhea prevailed in the camp and there was much suffering, 
due to exposure and lack of food and rest. 

After leaving Fort Bridger, 50 wagons with provisions met them. A fierce snow storm 
came up while they were crossing the Rocky Pass, which made traveling difficult. That day they 
made only 16 miles pulling their carts. It was the worst day of the trip. Fifteen persons died, 
some of them pulling hand carts all day and dying in the night. There were 77 deaths from 
Liverpool to Salt Lake City, 68 from Iowa to the west. (From the diary of John Jaques.) 

In this company Rebecca pulled her cart, walking all the way. They arrived in Salt Lake 
City, October Qt , some with badly frozen hands and feet, very tired and weary, but very thankful 
that they were able to stand the long hard journey to the West. 

After spending a week in Salt Lake City, Rebecca was sent to Lehi, where she found 
work in the home of William Goates and his wife, Susan Larking Goates. Here she was a 
domestic servant. She was a strong woman and did all that she could to assist the family in the 
home and gardens. In the spring of that year she was married as a second wife of William 
Goates, lovingly helping him in all that he undertook to do. 

In later years, after the death of the first wife, Rebecca was a devoted mother to her 
husband's motherless children. She dearly loved them, and though she never became a mother 
herself, she was truly a devoted mother to these children. 

Samuel and Betsy's youngest daughter, Susan Elizabeth with a sympathy for her mother, 
whose poor heart was overflowing with grief and agony, promised that even though she'd joined 
the Church, she would never leave her mother to come to America as long as she lived. Susan 
remained true to that promise. Her mother died 30 November 1862 and then Susan made 
definite plans to leave her homeland, which she did 4 June 1863. 

This life sketch was compiled by Opal W. Clements, a granddaughter of Susan Pilgrim 
Weekes. 
Sources of Information: 

1 . Life Sketch of Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim Weekes and Rebecca Pilgrim Goates, written by 
Beatrice Jane Hathcock Hansen, a granddaughter of Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim Weekes, 26 
January 1977. 

2. Life Sketch of Rebecca Pilgrim Goates written by Emma Goates Phillips, a 
granddaughter of William Goates, who helped care for Rebecca in her old age. 

3. Family Group Sheet of William Coote and Ann Debney. 

4. Family Group Sheet of Samuel Pilgrim and Betsy Coote. 

5. Deseret News Church Almanac 1977, p. 273. 



377 



REBECCA PILGRIM GOATES 

Rebecca Pilgrim Goates, daughter of Samuel Pilgrim and Betsy Coote, was born at 
William Reed's Farm, Madingly Road, St. Giles Parish, Cambridgeshire, England, January 1, 
1826. 

When she was 16 years of age, her father died, leaving her mother with eight children. 
Being the oldest girl then at home, she aided very materially in supporting the family. 

In 1852 she joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This brought upon 
her much opposition from her family and friends, but she was undaunted and fearless in her 
convictions and though persecuted and scorned, she remained faithful and true. In 1 856 on the 
fourth day of May, she left her native home and emigrated to Utah, sailing on the ship 
"Thornton" with a company in care of Elder Levi Savage, arriving at New York June 14, 1856. 

She joined Captain James G. Willie's hand cart company, numbering about five hundred, 
which left Iowa City, Iowa July 15, 1856 with 120 hand carts and six wagons. She pulled a hand 
cart 1,400 miles through valleys and over the plains and mountains. The terrible privations of 
her company and the suffering they endured on the trip are a matter of record. 

A recital of the sad story of the hand cart company disaster always filled her heart with 
pride and thanksgiving at the thought that she had passed through such hardships for the cause 
which she had embraced and loved so much. She arrived in Salt Lake City, November 9, 1 856, 
after great suffering from scarcity of provisions, cold, and over exertion in the mountains, many 
of the company perishing during the trip. She remained in Salt Lake City about one week and 
then came to Lehi. 

In April, 1857, she married William Goates. The remainder of her life was lovingly 
devoted to assisting him in all he undertook to do. She took the place of a mother and cared for 
his motherless children; she was devoted and faithful, and although she never became a mother, 
she was indeed a mother to the motherless. She was kind, sympathetic and generous, always 
ready to assist those in need, and was ever busy looking after the welfare of others. She 
possessed a remarkably strong constitution, which took considerable time to wear away, but was 
finally called to a well earned rest, after having been confined to her bed two weeks, suffering of 
general debility. She passed peacefully away to the Great Beyond, at 12:30 a.m., April 18, 1909. 
Her honored career was closed in full faith and fellowship in the cause for which she so long had 
suffered, at the age of 83 years, 3 months, and 1 7 days. 

Written by George A. Goates 



378 



Thomas Grover 



& 



Caroline Nickerson 



c 
i 

c 
-c 

■•■■ 
a 



Family 



12 & 13 



379 



380 



Family Group Record- 2634 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Thomas GROVER-5489 



Bom 
Chr 
Died 
Buried 



22 Jul 1807 



20 Feb 1886 
23 Feb 1886 



Place Whitehall, Washington, New York 

Place 



Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 
Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 



LOS ordinance dates 
Baptized Sep 

Endowed 15 Dec 
SealPar 20 Jan 



1834 
1845 

1846 



Temple 

NAUVO 
NAUVO 



Married 



1828 



Place Whitehall. Washington, New York 



seaisp 20 Jan 1846 



NAUVO 



other spouse C aroline Eliza NIC KERS ON-59 15 

Married 20 Feb 1841 (D) | Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 

ottier spouse Elizabeth 'Bet sy' FOOT E -6958 

Married Abt 1844 } Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 

Other Spouse 
Married 



seaisp 20 Jan 1846 



M RIN 26 35 

NAUVO 

MRIN: 2636 



SeaISp 



Hannah TUPPER-6972 



MRIN: 2637 



_£7 D££1844 I Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 

other spouse Lu duska O r Laduska TUPPER-5801 

Married 20 Jan 1846 I Place Nauvoo Hancock, Illinois 



seaisp 20 Jan 1846 J NAUVO 

MRIN: 614 
NAUVO 



"I seaisp 20 Jan 1 846 



other spouse Mary POTTS-6959 

Mame d 24 Mar 1855 (D) j Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 
other spouse Emma WALKER-5802_ 

Married 29 Oct 1856 

Other Spouse 

Mamed 28 Dec 1856(D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 

other spouse Elizabeth WAL KER-5803 

Mamed 24 Jan 1857 [piace Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 



Place Salt Lake City, SaltLake, Utah 
Amorette ALLEN-6894 



MRIN: 2638 

Tseaisp 24 Mar 1 855 1 EHOUS 

MRIN: 2639 

Tseaisp ~29 Oc t 1856 I EHOUS 

MRIN: 2640 

{ seaisp 28 Dec 1856 1 EHOUS, 

MRIN: 2641 

l seaisp 24 Jan 1 857 I EHOUS 



Husband's father Thomas G ROVER JR .-5491 
Husbanrfsmother Polly SPALDING-1506 



MRIN. 615 



Wife 



Caroline WHITING-5800 



Bom 



Chr 



25 J un 1 809 | Place Str afford, Windham, V ermont 



Place 



Pied 17 Nov 1840 Place Nouvoo, Hancock Illinois 

Buried | Place Nouvoo. Hancock Illinois 



LDS ordinance dates 

Sep] 



Baptized 
Endowed 
SealPar 



20 Jan 
14 Dec 



1834 
1846 



1959 



Temple 



NAUVO 
LOGAN 



wifes father Nathanial WHITING-6960 

wife's mother Mercy YOUNG-6961 



MRIN 2915 



Children List each child in order of birth. 



LDS ordinance dates 



Temple 



Jane GROVER-6895 



Bom 
Chr. 



Died 



30 Mar 1830 



4 Sep 1873 



Buried 



Pbce^ Wh itehall, Washingt on, New York 



Place 



Place Farmin gton, Davis, Utah 



Baptized 
Endowed 



31 Mar 
27 Jun 



1838 
1868 



SealPar 30 Jan 1891 



EHOUS 
LOGAN 



Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 



Spouse 



Married 



Ja mes Wesley STEWAR T-6845 
29 Jul 1850 I Place San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California 



MRIN: 3503 



seaisp 27 Jun 1868 I EHOUS 



Emeline GROVER-6896 



30 Jul 1831 



Bom 
Chr. 

Died 4 May 1917 

Buried 



P lace Freed om, Cattaraugus, New York 



Place 



place Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 
Place Paris, Bear Lake. Idaho 



Baptized 
Endowed 
SealPar 



31 Mar 

_5_Jan 

30 Jan 



1840 
1846 
1891 



NAUVO 
LOGAN 



spouse Chartes C. RICH-6906 

Married 2 Feb 1846 I Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 



SeaISp 



2 Feb 1846 



MRIN: 3516 

NAUVO 



Mary Elizabeth GROVER-6897 



Bom 

Ch L_ 

Died 

Buried 



13 Apr 1833 



Place Free dom, Cattaraug us , New York 

Place 



28 Sep 1921 Place Shelley, Binghamjdahp 

I Place Sutton Cemetery. Archer. Madison. Idaho 



1841 
1856 
SealPar 30 Jan 1891 



Baptized 
Eadowed 



May 
9 Ma y 



EHOUS 
LOGAN 



Spouse 
Married 



William Alpheus SIMMONS-6907 

Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 



26 Apr 1850 



SeaISp 



17 Jun 1856 



MRIN: 3517 

EHOUS 



spouse David ROBISON-7265 

Mamed 26 Dec 1860 | Place Morgan. Morgan. Utah 



MRIN: 3660 



SeaISp 



Adeline GROVER-6898 



Bom 
jChr. 
Died 
Buried 



10 Feb 1835 



7 Apr 1919 



Place Free dom, Catta raugus, New^Yprk 

Place 

Place 

Place 



Baptized 9 NOV 



Endowed 
SealPar 



10 Dec 
30 Jan 




LOGAN 
LOGAN 



Prepared by 
Phone 

E-maii address cari@srv.myrf.net 

Date prepared 5 Jun 2006 



Cad Nykamp 
208-523-7378 



Address 14054 N 65 E 



Idaho Falls 

Idaho 

83401 USA 



381 









Family Group Record 






Page 2 of 2 




Husband Thomas GROVER 




wife Caroline WHITING 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


5 


F 


Caroline GROVER 






Bom 18 Jan 1837 


Place FAR West, Caldwell, Missouri 


Baptized 


26 Jun 1854 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9 May 1856 






Died 19 Jul 1930 


Place 


SealPar 


30 Jan 1891 1 


LOGAN 






Buried 


Place 








spouse John Republican HEATH 








Married 27 Jun 1860 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


27 Jun 1860] EHOUS 


6 


F ! 






Bom 13 Mar 1839 


Place Palmyra, Marion, Missouri 


Baptized 


26 Jun 1854 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


9 May 1856 


EHOUS 




Died 3 Mar 1920 


place Parker, Freemont, Idaho 


SealPar 


30 Jan 1891 


LOGAN 




Buried 


Place Parker Freemont. Idaho 








Spouse William Alpheus SIMMONS 








Married 9 Mav 1856 ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


9 Mav 18561 EHOUS 




spouse Wyman Minard PARKER 




Married 15 Jan 1860 | Place 


SeaISp 


1 


7 


F 


Emma GROVER 






Bom 10 Oct 1840 ! Place Nauvoo, Hancock. Illonis 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 20 Oct 1840 Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SealPar 


30 Jan 1891 


LOGAN 




Buried | Place NauVOO, HanCOCk, Illonis 




spouse unmarried 




Married Place 


SeaISp 





382 



Family Group Record- 2635 



Page 1 of 1 





Husband Thomas GROVER-5489 






Bom 22 Jul 1807 Place Whitehall, Washinqton, New York 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr | Place 


Baptized 


Sep 1834 








Died 20 Feb 1886 j Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1845 


JMAUVO 






Buried 23 Feb 1886 j Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




Mamed 20 Feb 1841 (D) ! Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SealSp 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




other spouse Caroline WHITING-5800 




MRIN: 2634 




Married 1828 ] Place Whitehall, Washinaton. New York 


SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 I NAUVO 




other spouse Elizabeth 'Betsy' FOOTE-6958 




MRIN: 2636 




Married Abt 1844 I Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SealSp 


~T~ 




other spouse Hannah TUPPER-6972 




MRIN: 2637 




Mamed lifted 1844 ~\ Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 




h other spouse Luduska Or Laduska TU PPER-5801 




MRIN: 614 




Married 20 Jan 1846 I Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SealSp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 




other spouse Mary POTTS-6959 




MRIN: 2638 




Married 24 Mar 1 855 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Mar 1855 1 EHOUS 




other spouse Emma WALKER-5802 




MRIN: 2639 




Married 29 Oct 1856 I Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake. Utah 


SealSp 


29 Oct 1856T EHOUS 




other spouse Amorette ALLEN-6894 




MRIN: 2640 




Married 28 Dec 1856 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


28 Dec 1856TEHOUS 




other spouse Elizabeth WALKER-5803 




MRIN: 2641 




Married 24 Jan 1857 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Jan 1857 I EHOUS 




Husbands father Thomas GROVER JR.-5491 




MRIN: 615 




Husbands mother PollV SPALDING-1506 




wife Caroline Eliza NICKERSON-591 5 




* 


J3om 28Jun1808 


Place Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


Apr 1833 






dkhj 28 Jul 1889 


Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1845 


NAUVO 






Buried Jul 1889 Place Grantsville. Tooele, Utah 


SealPar 


9 Feb 1952 


SLAKE 




other spouse Marshall MOORE HUBBARD-5804 




MRIN: 2919 




Married 18 SeD 1827 I Place Perrvsbura. Cattarauous, New York 


SeaISp 


21 Feb 1851 ! POFFI 




other spouse Andrew Jackson STEWART-5805 




MRIN: 2150 




Married 21 Feb 1851 (D) I Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


I 




wifes father Freeman NICKERSON-3281 




MRIN: 1469 




wifes mother Huldah CHAPMAN-3282 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


F 


Percia Cornelia GROVER-6891 






Bom 27 Dec 1841 


Place Nauvoo, Handcock, Illinois 


Baptized 


Sep 1851 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


29 Oct 1864 


EHOUS 




Died 2 Feb 1924 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Feb 1924 


Place Provo Citv Cemetery. Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 




spouse Stephen Itamer BUNNELL-6523 




MRIN: 3381 




Married 18 Sep 1854 I Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


SeaISp 


29 Oct 1864 1 EHOUS 


2 


M 


Leonard Nickerson GROVER-6892 






Bom 27Auq1843 


Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 28Auq1843 


Place Nauvoo, Hancock, llllinois 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 




spouse unmarried -7284 




MRIN. 3667 j 




Married [ Place 


SeaISp 


I 


3 


F 


Data Nickerson GROVER-6893 






Bom 22 Sep 1844 


Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died Jul 1845 


place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 








spouse Unmarried -4016 




MRIN: 3668 




Mamed Place 


SeaISp 


I 


4 


L^r 


Marshall Hubbard GROVER-1505 


^_ 


W 


Bom 27 Sep 1846 


Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


Baptized 


15 Jul 18651 


,r 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


11 Dec 1871! EHOUS 






Died 8 Feb 1918 


Place Archer, Madison, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC I 




Buried 12 Feb 1918 


Place Sutton Cemetery. Madison, Idaho 




spouse lsabelleORR-1347 




MRIN: 545 




Mamed 1 1 Dec 1871 I Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


11 Dec 1871 I EHOUS 



25 May 2006 



383 



Family Group Record- 2919 



Page 1 of 1 





Husband Marshall MOORE HUBBARD-5804 






Bom 17Jun1805 


Place Rochester, Windsor, Vermont 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


1 Apr 1833 








Died 18 Sep 1838 


Place Oqden, Lenawee, Michiqan 


Endowed 


17 Apr 1889 






Buried Sep 1838 


Place Palmvra Cemetery 


SealPar 


28 Mav 1957 


ARIZO 




Married 18 Sep 1827 I Place Perrvsburq, Cattarauqus, New York 


SeaISp 


21 Feb 1851 


POFFI 




Husband's father Elisha HUBBARD-7030 




MRIN: 2922 




Husband-smother Elizabeth POWERS-7031 








WJ5 


2 Caroline Eliza NICKERSON-5915 








♦ 


'Bom 28Jun1808 


Place Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont 


LOS ordinance dates 


Temple 




>Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


Apr 1833 








Died 28 Jul 1889 


Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1845 


NAUVO 






Buried Jul 1889 


place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 


SealPar 


9 Feb 1952 


SLAKE 




other spouse Thomas GROVER-5489 




MRIN: 2635 




Married 20 Feb 1841 (D) | Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 




other spouse Andrew Jackson STEWART-5805 




MRIN: 2150 




Married 21 Feb 1851 (D) I Place Salt Lake Citv, Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


I 




Wife-s father Freeman NICKERSON-3281 




MRIN: 1469 




wifes mother Huldah CHAPMAN-3282 








Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


F Mary Eliza HUBBAR 


D-7034 






Bom 4 Jan 1831 


Place Perrvsburq, Cattarauqus, New York 


Baptized 


7 May 1955 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


10 May 1955 






Died 20 Jan 1878 


Place Cavindendish. Windsor, Vermont 


SealPar 


28 Mav 1957 


ARIZO 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse Joseph Welcome MILLER-7035 




MRIN: 3563 




Married Place 


SeaISp 


I 


2 


F 


Caroline Maria HUBBARD-7037 




Bom 22 Mar 1833 Place Sprinqville, Erie, New York 


Baptized 


11 May 1841 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


17Jun1856 


EHOUS 




Died 4 Oct 1910 


Place Murray, Salt Lake, Utah 


SealPar 


28 May 1957 


ARIZO 




Buried Oct 1910 


Place Murray Salt Lake. Utah 








Spouse John Marcellus PERRY-7038 




MRIN: 3564 j 




Married 23 Dec 1849 I Place Des Moines. Polk, Iowa 


SeaISp 


I 




spouse Dominicus CARTER-7039 




MRIN: 3565 




Married 20 Oct 1854(D) | Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


JL 




spouse William Beattie or BEATTY-7040 




MRIN: 3566 




Married 1860(D) | Place 


SeaISp 


I 




spouse Amos FENSTERMAKER-7041 




MRIN: 3567 




Married 7Jul1866 


Place Provo, Utah. Utah 


SeaISp 


15Jun1977l PROVO 


3 


F 


HULDA EMMA HUB 


BARD-7042 






Bom 27Auq1835 


Place Perrvsburq, Cattarauqus, New York 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 11 Jan 1840 


Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


SealPar 


28 May 1957 1 ARIZO 




Buried 


Place 




Spouse unmarried -7310 




MRIN: 3694 




Married I Place 


SeaISp 




4 


M 


Elisha Freeman HUE 


IBARD-7043 






Bom 5 Mar 1838 


Place Lenawee, County. Michiqan 


Baptized 


5 Mar 1846 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


4Apr1863 1 






Died 28 Mar 1911 


Place Hubbard, Graham, Arizona 


SealPar 


28 Mav 1928 I ARIZO 




Buried 31 Mar 1911 


Place Pima, Graham, Arizona 




spouse Almera WILSON-7044 




MRIN: 3568 




Married 2 Apr 1855 I Place Grantsville. Tooele, Utah 


SeaISp 


19Aor1889l 




spouse Aqnes ARCHIBALD-7045 




MRIN: 3569 




Married [ Place 


SeaISp 





Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


Phone 208-52iZ378 


Idaho Falls 


E-mail address carl<S)srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date prepared 25 May 2006 


83401 USA 



384 



Family Group Record- 2150 



Page 1 of 1 



Husband Andrew Jackson STEWART-5805 




Bom 28 Jun 1819 ! Place Jackson, Monroe, Ohio 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. I Place 


Baptized 




Died 7 Dec 1911 


Place Benjamin, Utah, Utah 


Endowed 




Buried 


Place Provo Cemetery. Provo, Utah, Utah 


SealPar 




Mamed 21 Feb 1851 (D) ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 




other spouse Eunice Pease HAWS-6524 


MRIN: 2923 


Mamed | Place 


SeaISp 


other spouse Mary Maria JUDD-5082 


MRIN: 2444 


Married [ Place 


SeaISp 


other spouse Catherine HOLDEN-26 1 2 


MRIN: 1463 


Married I Place 


SeaISp 


Husbands father Philander Barrett STEWART-61 76 


MRIN: 2613 


Husbands mother Sarah (Sallv) SCOTT-5453 




wife Caroline Eliza NICKERSON-591 5 


m 

~ 


r Bom 28 Jun 1808 


Place Cavendish, Windsor, Vermont 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




^Chr. 


Place 


Baptized Apr 1833 






Died 28 Jul 1889 


Place Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 


Endowed 15Dec1845 


NAUVO 


Buried Jul 1889 Place Grantsville. Tooele. Utah 


SealPar 9 Feb 1952 


SLAKE 


other spouse Marshall MOORE HUBBARD-5804 


MRIN: 2919 


Mamed 18 Sep 1827 I Place Perrvsburq. Cattarauaus. New York 


Seaisp 21 Feb 1851 1 POFFI 1 


other spouse Thomas GROVER-5489 


MRIN: 2635 


Mamed 20 Feb 1841 (D) [Place Nauvoo, Hancock. Illinois 


seaisp 20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 


WHes father Freeman NICKERSON-3281 


MRIN: 1469 




wrfes mother Huldah CHAPMAN-3282 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


M 


Moses. Carlos STEWART-4735 




Bom 1 Jan 1852 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


Baptized Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed Child 




Died 8 Oct 1852 

Buried 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


SealPar BIC 




Place 


spouse Unmarried -7299 


MRIN: 3689 


Married | Place 


SeaISp 



385 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 3 



Husband Thomas GROVER 




Bom 22 Jul 1807 


Place Whitehall, Washington, New York 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


Sep 1834 




Died 20 Feb 1886 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1845 


NAUVO J 




Buried 23 Feb 1886 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




Mamed ] *7 Eu»c1844 Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 




SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 I 




other spouse Caroline V 

Married 1828 


WHITING 










Place Whitehall. Washington. New York 


| SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




other spouse Caroline Eliza NICKERSON 








Married 20 Feb 1841 (D) i Place NauvoqJHancockJHinois 


I SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 I NAUVO 




other spouse Elizabeth "Betsy" FOOTE 


Married Abt 1844 ] Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


I SeaISp 


i 


other spouse Laduska Or Loduska TUPPER 


Married 20 Jan 1846_[ Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 


| SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 NAUVO 


other spouse Mary POTTS 


Married 24 Mar 1855(D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


I SeaISp 


24 Mar 1855 I EHOUS 


other spouse Emma WALKER 






Mamed 29 Oct 1856 I Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 


| SeaISp 


29 Oct 1856 | EHOUS 


other spouse Amorette ALLEN 




Married 28 Dec 1856 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


| SeaISp 


28 Dec 1856 1 EHOUS 




other spouse Elizabeth WALKER 








Married 24 Jan 1857 Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


| SeaISp 


24 Jan 1857 1 EHOUS 


Husband's father Thomas GROVER JR. 




Husband's mother Pollv SPALDING 


wife Hannah TUP 


PER 


r^ - ' 


Bom 23 Mar 1823 


Place Parishville, St. Lawrence, New York 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


11 Jun1843 






Died 15 Dec 1893 


Place Loa, Piute Utah 


Endowed 


22 Dec 1845 






Buried 17 Dec 1893 


Place Loa, Piute Utah 


SealPar 


7ADM972 


> LOGAN 




Wife's father Silas TUP 

wife's mother Hannah L 


PER 






\DD 






Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


l M ! Thomas GROVER 


i 


Bom 17 Nov 1845 


Place Naovoo, Hancock, Illinois 


Baptized 


25 Mar 1855 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


10 Mar 1861 


EHOUS 


Died 24 May 1931 


Place Salt Lake City. Salt Lake, Utah 


SealPar 


7 Apr 1863 I 


Buried 27Mav1931 


Place Morgan, Morgan. Utah 






spouse Elizabeth HEINER 








Married 10 Feb 1865 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah 


| SeaISp 


10 Feb 1865 1 EHOUS 




spouse Louisa Ann PICTON 


Mamed 15 Dec 1877 i Place St. Georqe, Washington. Utah 


| SeaISp 


15 Dec 1877 | SGEOR 


spouse Anna BARWELL SAUNDERS 








Married 7 May 1885 ■ Place Logan. Cache, Utah 


7 SeaISp 


7Mav1885| LOGAN 


F ! Hannah ( 




Bom 8 Jan 1847 


Place Winter Quarters Douqlas, Nebraska 


Baptized 


Jul 1856 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


18 Dec 1863 




Died 3 Mar 1864 


Place Parisville, St Lawrence, New York 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried Mar 1864 


Place 


Spouse James Isaac POTTS 


Married Place 


| SeaISp 




M 


Joel GROVER 


I 


Bom 11 Mar 1849 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1857 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


10 May 1865 


EHOUS 


i 


Died 13 May 1886 


Place Nephi, Jaub, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place 








Spouse Mary Asenith RICHARDS 


Married 5 Dec 1869 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


| SeaISp 


5 Dec 1869 ! EHOUS 


M 


James GROVER 




Bom 11Jun1851 


Place Kanesvilie Pottawattamie, Iowa 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 16Jun1851 


Place Kanesvilie Pottawattamie, Iowa 


SealPar 


BIC 




Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 


14054 N 65 E 




Phone 208-523-7378 




Idaho Falls 




E-m( 


mi address carl@srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date 


prepared 8 Apr 2006 


83401 USA 



386 



Family Group Record 



Page 2 of 3 



Husband Thomas GROVER 


wife Hannah TUPPER 


! Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Pm ! James GROVER 




Buned Jun 1851 Place Kanesville Potatwattamie, Iowa 








spouse unmarried 








Married Place 


SeaISp 




F Evelyn GROVER 




Bom 3 Jul 1852 


Place Kanesville Pottawattamie, Iowa 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 3JuM852 


Place Kanesville Pottawattamie, Iowa 


SealPar 


BIC 1 




Buried Jul 1852 


Place Kanesville Pottawattamie. Iowa 




spouse unmarried 








Married I Place 


SeaISp 


1 


M 


Hyrum Smith GROVER 




Bom 21 Mar 1853 


^lace Kanesville Pottawattamie, Iowa 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 21 Mar 1853 


Place Kanesville Pottawattamie, Iowa 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Mar 1853 | Place Kanesville Pottawattamie, Iowa 




Spouse unmarried 








Married Place 


SeaISp 




M 


Silas GROVER 




Bom 12 Jan 1854 


Place Bloominqton Grove, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child| 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child | 




Died 12 Jan 1854 


Place Bloominqton Grove, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BICj 


_ .j 


Buned Jan 1854 


Place Bloominqton Grove, Davis, Utah 


spouse unmarried 






Married Place 


SeaISp 


i 


i 
F 


Josephine GROVER 




Bom 7 Oct 1854 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 7 Oct 1854 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried Oct 1854 


Place Farminaton. Davis, Utah 


Spouse unmarried 






Married | Place 


SeaISp 


i 


M Jerome GROVER 




Bom 1 Jul 1855 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 1 Jul 1855 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Jul 1855 


Place Farminqton, Davis. Utah 




Spouse unmarried 




Married j Place 


SeaISp 




F 


Pauline GROVER 




Bom 31 Dec 1856 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


26 May 1865! 


Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


13 Nov 1871 ! EHOUS 


Died 15 Dec 1948 


Place Loa, Wayne, Utah 


SealPar 


BICJ 


Buried 18 Dec 


Place Loa. Wayne, Utah 








spouse Charles Albert BROWN 




Mamed 28 Aua 1872 ! Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake, Utah 


SeaISp 


28Auq1872! EHOUS 


F ! Maria Louisa GROVER 




Bom 26 Feb 1860 Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 19 Mar 1863 i Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buned Mar 1863 I Place Farminaton, Davis. Utah 








spouse unmarriec 








! Married 


Place 


SeaISp 


I 


M 


Jedediah Morgan Grant GROVER 




Bom 23 Nov 1861 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


1869 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


10 Jan 1884 


EHOUS 


Died 25 Aug 1901 


Place Loa, Wayne, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 28Auq1901 


Place Loa, Wayne, Utah 






Spouse Caroline Eliza BIGLER 


Married 10 Jan 1884 i Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


10 Jan 1884 I EHOUS 



8 Apr 2006 



387 









Family Group Record 






Page 3 of 3 


Husband Thomas GROVER 






wife Hannah TUPPER 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


12 


M 


Jedediah Morgan Grant GROVER 




spouse Emily BLACKBURN 






Married 1 Jun 1892 \ Place MANTI Sanpete, Utah 


SeaISp 


1Jun1892| MANTI 1 




Spouse Annette LAZENBY 








Married 29 Jun 1898 i Place MANTI Sanpete, Utah 


SeaISp 


29 Jun 1898 i MANTI 




spouse Emily MC 

Married 


CLELLAN 










Place 


SeaISp 


i 


13 


M Ezra GROVER 






Bom 8 Oct 1863 Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 




Chr. Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 22 Oct 1863 Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Oct 1863 I Place Farminqton, Davis. Utah 






Spouse unmarried 










Married Place 


SeaISp 




14 


M 


John Ladd GROVER 






Bom 12 Oct 1865 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 12 Oct 1865 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Oct 1 865 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 




Spouse unmamed 


15 




Mamed Place 


SeaISp 


I 


M 


Charles C Rich GROVER 






Bom 14 Mar 1867 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child | 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 14 Mar 1867 


place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC! 




Buried Mar 1867 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 






spouse unmarried 


. 




Married { Place 


SeaISp 





388 



Family Group Record 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Thomas GROVER 


I — 


Bom 22 Jul 1807 


Place Whitehall, Washinqton, New York 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr 


Place 


Baptized 


Sep 1834 , 




Died 20 Feb 1886 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1 845 1 


NAUVO 




Buried 23 Feb 1886 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




Mamed 20 Jan 1846 i Place Nauvoo, Hancock. Illinois 


SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




other spouse Caroline WHITING 








Married 1828 i Place Whitehall. Washinaton. New York |seais P 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO 




other spouse Caroline Eliza NICKERSON 








Married 20 Feb 1841 (D) ! Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois I seaisp 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO j 




other spouse Elizabeth 'Betsy' FOOTE 




Married Abt 1844 i Place NauVOO, HanCOCk, Illinois |SealSp 


outer spouse Hannah TUPPER 






Mamed ij Dec1844 j Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois |sealSp 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVCT 


other Spouse Mary POTTS 


Married 24 Mar 1855 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah I Seaisp 


24 Mar 1855 


EHOUS 


other spouse Emma WALKER 






Married 29 Oct 1856 j Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah I Seaisp 


29 Oct 1856 


EHOUS 


other spouse Amorette ALLEN 


Married 28 Dec 1856(D) 
other spouse Elizabeth 


place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah I seaisp 


28 Dec 1856 


EHOUS 


WALKER 






Married 24 Jan 1857 T Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah TseaiSp 


24 Jan 1857 i EHOUS 


Husband's father Thomas GROVER JR. 


Husbands mother Polly SPALDING 


Wife 




Bom 22Mav1828 


Place Parisville, St. Lawrence, New York 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


29Jun1971 j SLAKE 


Died 27 Mar 1902 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


5 Jan 1846 


lNAUVO 


Buried 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


7Aj>M972 


ilogan 


Wife's father Silas TUPPER 


wife's mother Hannah LADD 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


F 


Lucy GROVER 




Bom 7 Jan 1849 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


5 Jul 1857 


j 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Jan 1868 


J=HOUSj 


Died 19 NOV 1918 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 22 NOV 1918 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Spouse David Albert SANDERS 






Married 4 Jan 1868 I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah I Seaisp 


4 Jan 1868 


EHOUS 


M 


Moroni GROVER 




Bom 3 Dec 1850 


place Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 10 NOV 1851 


Place Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA 






spouse unmarried 


Married Place ~| SeaISp 


M 


Jacob GROVER 




Bom 17 Dec 1852 


Place Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA 


Baptized 


8 Sep 1864 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


27 Sep 1872 


EHOUS 


Died 23 Jul 1882 


Place Star Valley, Freedom, Wyoming 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried i Place 






Spouse Annie Elizabeth SMITH 


Mamed 27 SeD 1872 ! Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah I seaisp 


27 Sep 1872 


EHOUS 


M 


Nepoleon GROVER 




Bom 5 Sep 1855 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


1864 




Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


4 Jan 1875 


EHOUS 


Died 30Jun1901 


Place Ogden, Weber, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 3 Jul 1901 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 






Spouse Amy Amelia BIGLER 


Married 14 Oct 1877 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah I seaisp 


3 Mar 1943 


SLAKE 


Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 


E-maii address carl@srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


Date prepared 8 Apr 2006 


83401 USA 



389 



Family Group Record 



Page 2 of 2 



Husband Thomas GROVER 


wife Laduska Or Loduska TUPPER 


Children List each child in order of birth. 


IDS ordinance dates Temple 


M | Edward Partridge GROVER 




Bom 22 Apr 1859 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


2Jun 1867 






Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


19Jun1895 


SLAKE 




Died 18 Jan 1901 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried | Race Parker, Freemont, Idaho 


spouse Fanny Belle CLAWSON 






Mamed 25 Dec 1882 i Place Farminqton. Davis, Utah 


SeaISp 


19Jun1895l SLAKE 


M 


Danna Inez GROVER 




Bom 27 Aug 1861 J Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 4 May 1869 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Farminqton. Davis, Utah 




spouse unmarried 








Married unmarried [ Place 


SeaISp 


I 


M 


Don Carlos GROVER 


_ 


Bom 5Auq1869 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


ChildJ 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 




Died 25 Sep 1869 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Spouse unmarried 


Married I Place 


SeaISp 


! 



390 



Family Group Record- 2639 



Page 1 of 2 



Husband Thomas GROVER-5489 




Bom 22 Jul 1807 Place Whitehall, Washington, New York 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


Chr. LPIace 


Baptized 


Sep 1834 




i 


Died 20 Feb 1886 j Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


15 Dec 1845 


NAUVO 


I 


Buned 23 Feb 1886 Place Farmincjton. Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


20 Jan 1846 


NAUVO | 




Married 29 Oct 1856 Place Salt Lake Citv. Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


29 Oct 1856 


EHOUS 


i 


other spouse Caroline WHITING-5800 


MRIN: 2634 




Married 1828 Place Whitehall, Washinaton, New York Iseaisp 


20 Jan 1846 i NAUVO 




other spouse Caroline Eliza NICKERSON-5915 


MRIN: 2635 




Mamed 20 Feb 1841 (D) ! Place Nauvoo, Hancock. Illinois fseaisp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 




other spouse Elizabeth 'Betsy' FOOTE-6958 


MRIN: 2636 




Married Abt 1844 | Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois |seaisp 




other spouse Hannah TUPPER-6972 


MRIN: 2637 


Married |7 DCC1844 | Place NauvO | SeaISp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 


other spouse Laduska Or Loduska TU PPER-580 1 


MRIN: 614 


Married 20 Jan 1846 I Place Nauvoo, Handcock, Illinois |seaisp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 


other spouse Mary POTTS-6959 


MRIN: 2638 


Mamed 24 Mar 1855 (D) I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah I Seaisp 


24 Mar 1855 1 EHOUS 


other spouse Amorette > 
Married 28 Dec 1856 (D) 


\LLEN-6894 




MRIN: 2640 




Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah I Seaisp 


28 Dec 1856 


EHOUS ! 




other spouse Elizabeth WALKER-5803 


MRIN: 264lJ 




Mamed 24 Jan 1857 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah I Seaisp 


24 Jan 1857 I EHOUS 




Husband's father Thomas GROVER JR.-5491 


MRIN. 615 j 




Husbands mother Polly SPALDING-1 506 




wife Emma WALKER-5802 




Bom 15 Mar 1837 


Place Bristol, Somerset, Enqland 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 




Chr. 


Place 


Baptized 


22Jun1990 


LOGAN 




Died 5 Dec 1920/1922 


Place St. Anthony, Freemont, Idaho 


Endowed 


29 Oct 18561 EHOUS 




Buried J Place Farminqton, Davis. Utah 


SealPar 


bic! 




wires father Henry WA 
wife's mother Elizabeth 


LKER-7014 


MRIN: 2917 1 




LEWIS-7015 




Children List each child in order of birth. lds ordinance dates 


Temple 


F KaturaGROVER-7016 




Bom 8 May 1858 j Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


9 Aug 1868 






Chr j Place 


Endowed 


2Jun1897 


SLAKE 




Died 16 Feb 1944 Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


SealPar 






Buried Feb 1944 |Piace Parker. Freemont, Idaho 




spouse William FLINT-701 7 


MRIN: 3558 j 




Married 17Jun1877 I Place Morqan, Morqan, Utah Iseaisp 


2Jun1897l SLAKE 1 


F 


Rozeila GROVER-7C 


118 




Bom 1 Mar 1860 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


14Jun1869 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


26 Oct 1891 






Died 3 Nov 1934 


Place Parker Freemont, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 4 Nov 1934 


Place Parker. Freemont, Idaho 




spouse HenrySIMPSON-7019 


MRIN: 3559 




Mamed 7 Aua 1878 i Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah J Seaisp 


7Auq1879i EHOUS 


... _ 
M 


Henry Alford GROVER-7020 




Bom 12 Apr 1862 j Place Farminqton. Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


5 May 1870 




Chr. ! Place 


Endowed 


13 Oct 1891 


SLAKE 


Died 23 Jul 1928 Place Parker, Freemont, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 




Buried 25 Jul 1928 Place Parker. Freemont. Idaho 


Spouse Esther Beart SMITH-7021 


MRIN: 3560 


Mamed 18 Oct 1885 ! Place Farminqton. Davis. Utah Iseaisp 


I 


F 


Amy Blanche GROV 


ER-7022 




Bom 1864 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child ; 


Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 


Died 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 


Buried 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Spouse unmarried -7279 


MRIN: 3680 


Married unmarried Place I SeaISp 


I I 


prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 


IPhone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 


5 E-maii address car10srv.myrf.net 


Idaho 


[ Date prepared 1 8 Mar 2006 


83401 USA 



391 



Family Group Record- 2639 



Page 2 of 2 





Husband Thomas GROVER-5489 






I 




wife Emma WALKER-5802 










Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


5 


F 1 Emma Vernica GROVER-7023 










■ 


Bom 7 Nov 1866 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 






Died 9 Mar 1937 


Place Budey, Cassia, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried 14 Mar 1937 i Place Parker. Freemont. Idaho 










spouse Ira POULTON-7280 






MRIN: 3681 




Mamed 18 Nov 1886 I Place Farminqton. Davis. Utah 


SeaISp 






6 


M 


William Franklin GROVER-7024 






Bom Mar 1868 j Place Farminqton. Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


3Jun1876 






Chr. j Place 


Endowed 


2 Apr 1925 






Died 29 Jan 1919 


Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buned 2 Feb 1919 


Place Farminqton. Davis. Utah 




spouse Celestia Blanche PIERCE-7025 






MRIN: 3561 




Mamed 3 Nov 1897 I Place Farminqton, Davis. Utah 


SeaISp 


9 Nov 1950 




7 


M 


Abner, GROVER-7026 






Bom 1870 I Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 








Died 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Farminqton. Davis, Utah 




spouse unmarried -7281 






MRIN: 3682 




Mamed unmarried ! Place 


SeaISp 






8 


M ! David GROVER-7027 












Bom 1872 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 






spouse unmarried -7294 






MRIN: 3687 




Mamed Place 


SeaISp 






9 


M ! Albert Isaiah GROVER-7028 












Bom 7Jun1874 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


18 Dec 1901 


SLAKE 




Died 30 Jul 1938 


place Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 2Auq1938 


Place Salt Lake. Citv Cemetery. Salt Lake. Utah 




spouse Hortense HESS-7029 






MRIN: 3562 




Married 18 Dec 1901 I Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


18 Dec 1901 


SLAKE 



392 







Family Group Record 






Page 1 of 2 




Husband Thomas GROVER 






Born 22 Jul 1807 I Place Whitehall, Washington, New York 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 




Chr j Place 


Baptized 


Sep 1834 | 


Died 20 Feb 1886 i Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


15Dec1845J_NAUVO 


Buried 23 Feb 1886 j Place Farminrjton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


20Jan1846)NAUVO 


Mamed 24 Jan 1857 Place Salt Lake, Salt Lake. Utah 


SeaISp 


24 Jan 1857 EHOUS 


1 


other spouse Caroline WHITING 




Married 1828 1 Place Whitehall. Washinqton. New York |seais P 


20 Jan 1846 i NAUVO 




other spouse Caroline Eliza NICKERSON 






Mamed 20 Feb 1841 (D) i Place Nauvoo. Hancock, Illinois [seaisp 


20 Jan 1846 i NAUVO 




other spouse Elizabeth 'Betsy' FOOTE 






Mamed Abt 1844 Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois |sealSp 




other spouse Hannah TUPPER 






Ma™** ]7Drf£l844 Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Iseaisp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 




other spouse Laduska Or Loduska TUPPER 






Married 20 Jan 1846 ! Place Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Iseaisp 


20 Jan 1846 1 NAUVO 




other spouse Mary POTTS 






Mamed 24 Mar 1855 (D) ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah I seaisp 


24 Mar 1855 1 EHOUS 




other spouse Emma WALKER 






Mamed 29 Oct 1856 I Place Salt Lake City, Salt Lake. Utah |seais P 


29 Oct 18561 EHOUS 




other spouse Amorette ALLEN 






Mamed 28 Dec 1856 (D) ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah I seaisp 


28 Dec 1856 1 EHOUS 1 






Husband's father Thomas GROVER JR. 




Husband's mother Pol Iv S PAL D I NG 




Wife 






Bom 17 Oct 1839 | Place Cheltinq, Enqland 


LDS ordinance dates 


Temple 


1 


Chr. I Place 


Baptized 


25 Jul 1875 




Died 28 Mar 1910 Place Burley, Cassia, Idaho 


Endowed 


24 Jan 1857 


EHOUS 


Buried I Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


11 ADr1928! SLAKE 


wrfes father John WALKER 








wife's mother Elizabeth COLEMAN 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


i 
LDS ordinance dates Temple 


1 


F CLARA GROVER 






Bom 1 Jan 1858 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 








Died 28 Mar 1863 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 








Buried Mar 1863 Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 




spouse unmarried 




Married j Place | SeaISp 


2 


M Walter Leonard GROVER 




Bom 25 Dec 1860 I Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


7 Jun 1874 


. .... 




chr. 6 Jun 1861 I Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Endowed 


18 Jan 1888 


EHOUS 


i 


Died I Place 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried [ Place 


spouse Celia, MILLARD 






Married 18 Jan 1888 ! Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake. Utah I seaisp 


18 Jan 1888i EHOUS 


3 


F 


Elizabeth or Lizzie Burnett GROVER 






Bom 12 Apr 1863 Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. j Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 12 Oct 1863 Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried Oct 1863 I Place Farminqton. Davis, Utah 




Spouse unmarried 




Mamed ' Place | SeaISp 


| 


4 


F 


Zeruah May GROVER 






Bom 1 May 1865 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


17 Mar 2004! LANGE, 




Chr 


Place 


Endowed 


17 Apr 1884 EHOUS 




Died 27 Mar 1948 


Place Burtey, Cassia, Idaho 


SealPar 


BIC | 




Buried 31 Mar 1948 


Place Oaklev. Cassia, Idaho 








Spouse Thomas Poulton 1 784 






Mamed 17Aor1884 I Place Salt Lake. Salt Lake, Utah |seais P 


17 Apr 1884 EHOUS 




Prepared by Carl Nykamp 


Address 14054 N 65 E 




Phone 208-523-7378 


Idaho Falls 






E-mail address carl(5)srv. myrf.net 


Idaho 




Date prepared 8 Apr 2006 


83401 USA 





393 









Family Group Record 






Page 2 of 2 


Husband Thomas GROVER 




wife Elizabeth WALKER 




Children List each child in order of birth. 


LDS ordinance dates Temple 


4 


F I Zeruah May GROVER 






Mamed 13 Oct 1884 I Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


SeaISp 


I 

i 






Spouse Oluf OLSEN 








Mamed 18 Oct 1938 ! Place Farminaton, Davis, Utah 


SeaISp 


i 


5 


M 


Enoch GROVER 






Bom 24 Sep 1868 


Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


3 Jun 1877 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


22MayJ889 


LOGAN 




Died 5 Apr 1959 


J^lace 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 7 Apr 1959 


Place Pioneer Cemetery, Riqby, Jefferson, Idaho 


! 


Spouse Amber Jane CALL 






Married 22 Mav 1889 ! Place Loqan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


22 Mav 1889 I LOGAN 






Spouse Lynda CLARK 








Married (D) Place 


SeaISp 


I 




Spouse Martha Louisa MCBRIDE 








Married 8 Jun 1937 Place 


SeaISp 


| 


6 


LE 


Polly Alice GROVER 






Bom 24 Oct 1870 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


28 Sep 1880 








Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


28 Aug 1888 


LOGAN 




Died 5 Jul 1960 


Place Provo, Utah, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Garland, Box Elder. Utah 




Spouse Lorenzo SMITH 








Married 28 Auo 1888 i Place Loqan, Cache. Utah 


SeaISp 


28Auq1888l LOGAN 


7 


M Alma Fredrich GROVER 






Bom 29 Apr 1873 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. 


Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 14 Jan 1879 


Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 


Place Farmington. Davis. Utah 






spouse unmarried 






Married | Place 


SeaISp 


I 


8 


M 


Samuel GROVER 






Bom 23 Apr 1878 I Place Farminqton, Davis. Utah 


Baptized 


Child 






Chr. I Place 


Endowed 


Child 






Died 23 Apr 1878 ! Place Farmington, Davis, Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried | Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 




spouse unmarried 




Married I Place 


SeaISp 


I 


9 


M 


Layfayette GROVER 






Bom 21 Nov 1880 j Place Farminqton, Davis, Utah 


Baptized 


25Auq1889 






Chr. Place 


Endowed 


28 Jan 1899 


LOGAN 




Died 10 Feb 1953 Place East Garland. Box Elder. Utah 


SealPar 


BIC 






Buried 14 Feb 1953 I Place East Garland. Box Elder, Utah 








spouse Ellen Elizabeth Parkinson 




Mamed 28 Jun 1899 I Place Loqan. Cache, Utah 


SeaISp 


28 Jun 18991 LOGAN 



394 



Thomas Grover Descendants 
First Generation 



Spouse 

#1 Caroline Whiting(1809) (children: 7, children married: 6) 
Jane (3-31-1830) 
Emeline (7-30-1831) 
Mary Elizabeth (4-13-1833) 

Adeline (2-10-1835) 
Caroline (1-18-1837) 
Eliza Ann (3-1 1-1839) 

Emma (10-10-1840) 



#2 Caroline Eliza Nickerson (6-28-180 
Percia Cornelia (2-27-1842) 
Leonard (8-27-1843) 
Data (9-22-1844) 
Marshall Hubbard (9-27-1846) 



# Children # Married 



James Wesley Stewart 


11 


9 


Charles Coulson Rich 


8 


8 


William Alpheus Simmons 


6 


5 


David Robison 


9 


4 


Phineas Daley, Sr. 


6 


6 


John Republican Heath 


7 


6 


William Alpheus Simmons 


1 





Wyman Miner Parker 


12 


9 












60 


47 


) (children: 4, children married: 


2) 




Stephen Ithamer Bunnell 


12 


6 


















Isabelle Orr 


11 


9 




25 


15 



#3 Elizabeth "Betsy" Foote Clements (3-8-1794) 

#4 Hannah Tupper (3-23-1823) (children: 15, children married: 5) 
Thomas, Jr. (11-17-1845) 



Hannah (6-8-1847) 
Joel (3-11-1849) 
James (6-1 1-1851) 
Evelyn (7-3-1852) 
Hyrum Smith (3-21-1853) 
Silas (1-12-1854) 
Josephine (10-7-1854) 
Jerome (7-1-1855) 
Pauline (12-31-1856) 
Maria Louisa (2-26-1860) 
Jeddidiah Grant (11-23-1861) 



Ezra (10-8-1863) 

John Ladd (10-12-1865) 

Charles C. Rich (3-14-1867) 



Elizabeth Heiner 


7 


5 


Louisa Ann Picton 


9 


8 


Ann B. Sanders 


3 


3 


James Potts 








Mary Aseneth Richards 


8 


4 


















































Charles Albert Brown 


10 


6 










Eliza Bigler 


2 


2 


Emily Blackburn McLellan 


1 


1 


Annetta Lazenby 


2 


1 




























42 


30 



395 



#5 Laduska Tupper (5-22-1828) (children: 7, children married: 4) 
Lucy (1-7- 1849) 
Moroni (12-3-1850) 
Jacob (12-17-1852) 
Napoleon (9-5-1855) 
Edward Partridge (4-22-1859) 
Donna Inez (8-29-1861) 
Don Carlos (8-5-1869) 



David Albert Sanders 


12 


8 










Annie E. Smith 


4 


4 


Amy Armelia Bigler 


10 


7 


Fannie Bell Clawson 


9 


7 




















35 


26 



#6 Mary Potts (5-29-1832) 



#7 Emma Walker (3-15-1837) (children: 9, children married: 6) 
Keturah (5-7-1858) 
Rozella (3-1-1860) 
Henry Alfred (4-12-1862) 
Amy Blanche (1864) 
Emma Vernicia (3-23-1864) 
William Frank (3-23-1868) 
Abner(1870) 
David (1872) 
Albert Isaiah (6-7-1874) 



William Leonard Flint 


4 


4 


Henry Simpson 


11 


7 


Esther Bert Smith 


12 


8 










Ira Poulton 


8 


4 


Celestia Blanche Pierce 


7 


4 


















Hortense Hess 


4 


3 




46 


30 



#8 Amorette Allen (4-19-1838) 

#9 Elizabeth Walker (10-17-1839) (children: 9, children married: 5) 



Clara (1-1-1858) 










Walter Leonard (12-25-1860) 


Cecelia Millard 


9 


9 


Elizabeth Burnett (4-12-1863) 










Zeruah May (5-1-1865) 


Thomas Poulton 








Enoch (9-24-1868) 


Amber Jane Call 


13 


10 


Polly Alice (10-24-1870) 


Lorenzo Smith 


9 


6 


Alma Fredrich (4-29-1873) 










Samuel (4-23-1878) 










Layfayette (11-21-1880) 


Ellen Elizabeth Parkinson 


6 


6 






37 


31 


Grandchildren of Thomas Grover: 


245 


179 


Children of Thomas Grover: 


51 





Compiled by Joan Nykamp 2006. 



396 




Thomas Grover 
22 JULY 1807 - 20 February 1886 



397 




Caroline ELiza Nickerson 



25 June 1808 - 18 July 1889 



398 



THOMAS GROVER 

1807- 1886 

Thomas Grover was a "Mormon Pioneer" in the truest sense of the word. He helped 
blaze the trail west and settle the Salt Lake Valley. 

He was always loyal to the cause in whatever he was asked to do. He was dedicated and 
obedient, as a missionary, ferryman, battalion member, body guard, scout etc. 

He was blessed with financial means which he gave freely to the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter Day Saints, as well as others who were in need. 

The epitaph on Thomas Grover's gravestone in Farmington, Utah, reads: "an 
enterprising, industrious, charitable pioneer, a devoted faithful member of The Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Captain in the Nauvoo Legion and personal body guard of the 
Prophet Joseph Smith, called on several missions and to serve on numerous High Councils of the 
church, member of the original pioneer company of 1847, one of the founders of Centerville and 
Farmington, Utah, served in territorial and legislature (government) and as Davis County Judge. 

Thomas Grover met the Prophet Joseph Smith in 1 834, and was soon baptized. He sold 
his farm and moved to Kirtland. He bore a fervent testimony of the Church of Jesus Christ and 
the authenticity of Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon up until his death. The Prophet 
Joseph Smith described him best when he greeted him with the words, "if God ever sent a man, 
he sent you." 

Thomas Grover was born July 22, 1807, in Whitehall, Washington County, New York. 
His parents were Thomas Grover and Polly Spaulding. Polly was his fathers' second wife and 
Thomas was their fifth child. He was born about five months after his father died. 

Thomas Grover's ancestors are all of English decent. Captain Thomas Grover, the 
shoemaker, and Sarah Sherman are his grandparents. They lived in Grafton, Massachusetts. 
They were industrious and independent. The county records, deeds and Bill of Sales show many 
of his relatives were landowners. 

The Grover's lived on the southern tip of Lake Champlain. Their property was next to 
Lake Champlain and Woods Creek. Thomas must have been interested in the river life because 
he secured a position as a cabin boy when he was 12 years old. The barges operated on Lake 
Champlain and south to New York City. At a young age he was advanced to Captain of the 
Shamrock. It was a combined freight and passenger boat traveling from Quebec to New York 
City. Then it went from Albany westward to Buffalo and Lake Erie and on to Ontario. 

Thomas was 21 years old (1828) when he married Caroline Whiting in Vermont. Their 
first daughter Jane was born in March 1 830. Thomas chose to leave the riverboat and purchase a 
farm in Western New York. The 50-acre farm was in Freedom, Cattaraugus County, New York. 
They paid $132.39. This became the Grover's home for five years. During their years on the 
farm, three daughters were born, Emeline, Mary Elizabeth and Adeline. 

At this time the western part of New York was known for its religious revivals. It was not 
unusual to attend meetings by the different sects to learn of their beliefs. Thomas was an 
American Puritan. They were faithful in the Congregational Church. Many of their beliefs were 
similar to those taught by Joseph Smith. Family history tells us that Thomas was taught by 
Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon while they traveled through New York. The only record of 
Thomas joining the church was a statement written in December 1 884 in the diary of Joseph 
Holbrook. It reads: "I, Thomas Grover, son of Thomas Grover was born in Whitehall, 



399 



Washington County, New York July 22, 1807. Baptized by Warren A Cowdery, (Warren 
Cowdery is brother of Oliver Cowdrey), Freedom, Cattaraugus County, September, 1 834."'' 

In Nibley's Short History of the Church he states: "At this time there was great 
opposition to the church. In spite of opposition however, more than a hundred persons joined the 
church in New York." Besides the Smiths, the Whitmers, and the Knights, there were such 
families as the Rockwells, Coltrins, Grovers, and Martin Harris. Some of the converts such as 
Martin Harris, Joseph Knight, and Thomas Grover were well-to-do. The first named furnished 
the funds for publishing the Book of Mormon, and Thomas Grover, on joining the church, made 
the prophet a gift of a considerable sum of money." 

On March 15, 1835, Thomas sold his farm in Freedom for $500 and moved to Kirtland, 
Ohio with a group of saints. Thomas' arrival in Kirtland is recorded in the LPS Biographical 
Encyclopedia , by Andrew Jensen as follows: "Shortly after his arrival in Kirtland, Brother 
Grover called on the Prophet. As he knocked at the door the Prophet opened it and putting out 
his hand, said: 'How do you do, Brother Grover. If God ever sent a man he sent you. I want to 
borrow every dollar you can spare for immediate use'. Brother Grover entered the house and 
conversed with the Prophet about the situation, offering to let Joseph have what money he 
needed. Brother Joseph accepted the offer and told Brother Grover to look around and find a 
location that suited him for a home and then return, when the money he had advanced would be 
returned to him. In a short time the place was selected, but Brother Grover refused to receive 
back his money saying, T have sufficient for my needs without it." From that day the devotion 
of Thomas Grover to Joseph never wavered." 

In 1836, Thomas Grover was called to the High Council. He served faithfully until they 
moved a year later for economic instability over unwise investing and land speculation. In 1837, 
he moved his family to join the saints in Missouri. Persecution and other problems within the 
church forced them to leave most of their belongings and flee to Quincy, Illinois. Thomas 
claimed to have lost $2600 in goods and property. Soon the saints settled in Nauvoo, Illinois. 
Thomas purchased plot #27, a 3 A acre piece and built a large frame home there. During these 
busy years, a daughter, Caroline was born at Far West, Missouri, Eliza Ann was born in Palmyra, 
Missouri and Emma was born in October 10, 1840. She passed away on October 20, 1840 and 
sadly, Caroline Whiting, their mother, passed away November 17, 1840. 

The L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia states, "At the death of his wife Caroline, in 1840, 
the kindred of Brother Grover wrote to him from New York to bring his six little children home 
to them. The distracted father decided to do it and so told the Prophet Joseph of his intentions. 
Brother Joseph was at the time making preparations for a somewhat extended absence from 
home himself, and so said to Brother Grover, 'You are not to do anything of the kind. I want you 
to stay here and take care of my family while I am away." Brother Grover granted his request 
and his children often related how they had seen their father load up his wagon with food and 
provisions and take it to Emma Smith and her family. 

His six little girls lived with other families in Nauvoo until he married Caroline Eliza 
Nickerson Hubbard in February 20, 1841. She was the widow of Marshall Hubbard, a close 
friend of the prophet, who had died in 1838 of congestive chills. Thomas and Caroline had nine 
children between them, all under the age of eleven. In December 1841 they had a daughter, 
Percia. In August 1843, a son Leonard was born, he only lived 24 hours. In September 1844 
another daughter was born, but only lived one year. On September 22, 1 846, Marshall Hubbard 
Grover was born. The next day they crossed the Mississippi River and traveled seven weeks 
straight with the infant. 



400 



The rumors about polygamy were made official in August of 1843. Thomas said of the 
Nauvoo High Council Meeting: "Brother Hyrum Smith was called upon to read the revelation. 
He did so and after the reading said, w Now you that believe this revelation and go forth and obey 
the same shall be saved and you that reject it shall be damned.*" As is indicated in this statement 
Thomas felt this doctrine was a direct commandment by the Lord through the Prophet Joseph 
Smith. 

Thomas knew Joseph Smith was a true prophet and received revelation from God, but the 
practice of polygamy went against all Christian beliefs. Thomas sent a letter to Brigham Young 
sharing an experience he had that persuaded him to accept the law of polygamy. "At the time I 
was in the deepest trouble that I had ever been in, in my life. I went before the Lord in prayer and 
prayed that I might die, as I did not wish to disobey his order to me. All of a sudden there stood 
before me my oldest wife that I have now and the voice of the Lord said that this is your 
companion for time and all eternity. At this time I never had seen her and did not know that there 
was such a person on this earth." After about a year and a half Thomas married Hannah Tupper, 
the woman he claimed to have seen in his dream. About this time he also married Elizabeth 
"Betsy" Foote Clements, who only stayed with him a short time, and Loduska Tupper, Hannah's 
sister. 

While Thomas lived in Nauvoo he was very involved in his calling on the High Council 
(see D & C Sec 124: 132) as well as with civil and military duties. When the Nauvoo Legion was 
organized, Thomas was made a captain and assigned as aide-de-camp on the General Staff. On 
January 28, 1842, Thomas was chosen to be a personal body-guard to the prophet Joseph Smith. 
Thomas came to the prophets' rescue when he was kidnapped by Wilson and Reynolds. They 
were taking the prophet back to Missouri to be prosecuted on the charge that he had been part of 
an assassination attempt on Governor Boggs. Thomas spent the night locked up in a room with 
the prophet Joseph. After his trial, Joseph was released for lack of evidence. The prophet Joseph 
gave Thomas his sword, which became a precious family heirloom. The sword now rests in the 
Daughters of the Utah Pioneer Museum in Salt Lake City. (2006) 

Thomas fulfilled several missions for the church. In 1843 he was called by the Prophet 
on a mission to Canada. Thomas stated: "He could not live until the sunset", but Brother Joseph 
said he must get well and go perform that mission. He was accordingly healed by the power of 
God and in two weeks from that day he started, his wife (Caroline Nickerson Hubbard Grover) 
accompanying him to carry his valise down to see Brother Joseph who was then in secret from 
his enemies, when he saw Brother Grover feeble and trembling stand up to shake hands and take 
his leave, Brother Joseph said to him "Brother Grover you are very feeble but God will bless you 
and you shall be blessed and strengthened from this very hour" and within a few minutes he took 
his leave with a Joseph Robinson traveling without purse or script. He journeyed on, visiting the 
branches and strengthening the weak in the faith, teaching and bearing a faithful testimony. 

In April of 1844, the prophet called him to Michigan, the mission was cut short when 
Thomas was warned in a dream to return quickly to Nauvoo. The warning came three times, so 
Thomas told his companion, Brother Wilson and they made it a subject of prayer and quickly 
left. Thomas was a prayerful and obedient man, with a firm testimony of Joseph Smith and the 
truthfulness of the gospel. 

They arrived in Carthage, Illinois just after the martyrdom. They caught up with the 
company and helped escort the bodies to Nauvoo. Thomas' daughter, Mary Elizabeth recorded 
the following: "That evening that the Prophet and Hyrum were brought home from Carthage, 
after they had been martyred: I will never forget. Everybody stood along the street holding their 
hands and bowing their heads in solemn reverence as the bodies were escorted through the street. 



401 



Everyone's heart was so filled with sorrow, it seemed as if the world would come to an end. My 
father Thomas Grover helped wash and prepare them for burial. Their caskets were set on chairs 
side by side in the hall of the Prophet's home." At the Prophet's funeral, Emma, the wife of 
Joseph, asked Thomas to cut off a lock of the Prophet's hair of which she gave half to Thomas. 

The saints continued to suffer as the non-Mormons realized the church wouldn't fall 
apart with Joseph's death. As soon as the temple was finished enough to perform sacred 
ordinances, families were sealed and began preparing for the trek west. 

Caroline Nickerson, Elizabeth "Betsy" Foote Clements, Hannah Tupper and Loduska 
Tupper were the wives of Thomas Grover in Nauvoo. Caroline Nickerson mentions "Besty" and 
Hannah in her personal journal. There is a possibility that Betsy Foote had a son with Thomas. 
The only evidence we can find is the fact that Emeline Grover, daughter of Caroline Whiting and 
Thomas Grover, mentions in her diary that ""a son was born to this union." Hannah eventually 
gave birth to fifteen children as follows: Thomas, Hannah, Joel, James, Evelyn, Hyrum Smith, 
Silas, Josephine, Jerome, Pauline, Maria Louise, Jedediah Morgan Grant, Ezra, John Ladd, 
Charles Coleman Rich. Loduska gave birth to the following children: Lucy, Moroni, Jacob 
Napoleon, Edward Partridge, Donna Inez, Don Carlos. (Please refer to family group sheets.) 

Elizabeth "Betsy" Foote Clements, first wife of the late Thomas Clements and some of 
their eleven children started West with her younger brother Warren Foote. Betsy grew ill when 
she was 52 years old and passed away November 8, 1846 at Pigion Creek, Pottawattamee Co., 
Iowa near Council Bluffs, Iowa where she is buried. 

In February of 1846, the Grover's were one of the first families to leave Nauvoo. Thomas 
started West with three of his wives and some of his children. They suffered a great loss on the 
first day. Brigham Young describes the scene: "A number of brethren were crossing the river in a 
flat boat, when in their rear a man and two boys were in a skiff in a sinking condition, on account 
of being over loaded and the unskillfulness of the helmsman. They hailed to the flatboat, which 
soon turned and rendered them assistance. As soon as they got the three on board the flatboat, a 
filthy wicked man squirted some tobacco juice into the eyes of one of the oxen attached to 
Thomas Grover's wagon which immediately plunged into the river, dragging another ox with 
him, and as he was going overboard he tore off one of the side boards, which caused the water to 
flow into the flatboat, and as they approached the shore the boat sank to the bottom, before all 
the men could leap off. Several of the brethren were picked up in an exhausted condition. Two 
oxen were drowned and a few things floated away and were lost (including a Grover family 
history). The wagon was drawn out of the river with its contents damaged while trying to loosen 
the oxen, Brother Grover got off the boat and was down the stream some little distance when he 
saw that only the covers of the wagons were above the water. Being an expert swimmer he soon 
reached the boat and tearing the covers loose he told the folks not to move an inch and that not 
one hair of their heads should be harmed. Hannah held her ten- week-old baby on her shoulder to 
keep his head above water and the little three-year-old Percia cried, 'Lord save my little heart'. " 

Zina Young, a wife of President Brigham Young and the third President of the Relief 
Society, recorded this account in her journal in 1846. "9 th Feb. We were informed that we were 
to leave with the first company as the saints were obliged to leave the State.... Clear and cold we 
left our house, all we possessed in a wagon, left many things standing in our house unsold for 
most of our neighbors were as ourselves on the wing. Shall I ever forget standing on Major 
Russelfs porch and seeing Thomas Grover's wagon sink on a sandbar, the Brethren taking the 
little ones from the wagon cover, the bows just peeped above the water at the same time the bells 
were ringing the Temple was on fire and we leaving our homes for the wilderness trusting God 
like Abraham...." 



402 



Caroline said most of their personal items were lost but luckily their provisions wagon 
was on another boat. Somehow Thomas was able to get more animals and some new supplies 
because his family left with the other saints in early May. When the saints left Mt. Pisgah in 
Iowa, Caroline returned to Nauvoo on some business and didn't meet up with Thomas again until 
1850. Emeline Grover Rich writes in her journal, "His wife (meaning Thomas Grover) Caroline 
Eliza Nickerson was in consequence of being in delicate health, concluded to return to Iowa 
where she had relatives, stop there until the next season, when she would be in a better condition 
to travel. My father divided his teams and provisions, in fact gave her half of all he possessed, 
hired a man to drive her team to where she wished to locate. She took with her, her only living 
child (Percia) belonging to my father, and went back to her folks. It proved to be a final 
separation (Marshall Hubbard Grover was born 6 months later on September 27, 1846)/' 
Caroline had traveled west with Andrew Stewart's wagon train. Caroline asked for a divorce. In 
Emeline's journal we read, "Caroline divorced Thomas Grover and married Jackson Stewart on 
22 February 1851. At that time she was sealed to Marshall Moore Hubbard with Stewart as 
proxy." 

In Iowa the saints received a request from the US. Army to send 500 men to help fight 
the war with Mexico. Brigham Young's diary of June 30, 1846 describes what happened: 
"Evening: Brother Thomas Grover arrived at headquarters, and informed the council that Capt. 
Allen of the US. Army had arrived on the hill, and wanted volunteers; the captain had agreed to 
meet in council in the morning at ten. I met with Bros. Kimball and Richards in Bro. O. Pratt's 
tent. Decided it was best to meet Captain Allen in the morning and raise the men wanted." 

That summer the saints moved to Council Bluffs, Iowa and prepared for the winter. 
Brigham Young appointed a High Council to preside over all matters spiritual, and temporal. 
Thomas was a member of this council. On August 7. Brigham Young organized the saints on the 
west side of the river and Thomas was asked to move across the river and be part of that High 
Council. While at Winter Quarters, Thomas helped support his family by being a butcher for 
Lorenzo Young. President Kimball noticed that Thomas never took any meat home. He 
remarked a man should not be a butcher who would not eat meat. After that Thomas took some 
home occasionally. 

Early in 1847, Thomas was chosen to be in the 1st company of pioneers. He was in the 
2nd group often under Apostle Ezra Taft Benson. He left his family with adequate provisions. 
The following incident occurred on May 8, 1847. Between 2:00 and 3:00 p.m., William C. A. 
Smoot's horses ran away the second time that week. President Young and Heber C. Kimball rode 
out and Thomas Grover and John Brown put their horses at full speed to over take them, but they 
had to run more than a mile in the midst of a large herd of buffalo before Brothers Grover and 
Brown could over take the runaways. At length however, they succeeded in capturing them and 
bringing them safely into the camp. 

On June 12, the company arrived at the Platte River. The water was high and very 
dangerous to cross. The next day was Sunday and Brigham Young held a meeting to determine 
the safest way to cross. They concluded to cross the goods in a leather boat and to lash four 
wagons together with poles so they could pull them through the water with a rope. Apparently 
Thomas didn't agree with their method. His son recorded the following: "President Young gave 
his plan, but Thomas said, 'It will not work.' President Young said, T think it will." Thomas 
again said it would not work in that kind of stream, and then left the council and went to bed. 
Stephen Markham was Thomas's bunkmate. When he came to bed a man followed him to see 
what he had to say. Thomas said, T have forgotten more about water than President Young will 
ever know/ The man immediately went to President Young and told all that he had heard. The 



403 



next morning President Young called Thomas to task and asked if he made that remark. He said, 
'Of course I did. I was raised on the water and don't know anything else/ When President 
Young got his boat on the water President Kimball said, it runs nice/ Thomas said, 'Yes, but 
when it strikes the current it will go under/ He had barely spoken when it struck the current and 
disappeared. President Young turned to Thomas and said, 'My plan has failed; what is yours?' 
Thomas said, T shall take six men and go to that grove of timber yonder and get two trees and 
have them cut canoe fashion and lash them together and by daylight tomorrow we will have a 
boat to carry us across/ President Young said, 'Get your men and be off/ The men were chosen 
and when they arrived at the timber there were two trees that would fill the bill. In going to the 
trees, it was discovered that they were surrounded by rattlesnakes. After killing snakes for two 
hours the men succeeded in getting the trees. They worked all night, and by daylight the boat 
was in the river. In the meantime a number of emigrants on their way to Oregon had come up 
and were waiting for the Mormons to build the boat. When it was ready Thomas said, 'Bring the 
heaviest wagon you have here/ President Young said, 'Hadn't we better run a light wagon first?" 
Thomas said, 'No bring the heaviest/ They brought a prairie schooner with 6000 pounds on it 
and it went across all right. Thomas' plan to lash two trees together, shaped like dugouts into a 
ferry had worked. It was so successful that the entire company, as well as a number of emigrants, 
were ferried across by the 1 7th." 

Brigham Young decided to leave nine men behind to ferry other groups who were 
coming West. The men stayed the rest of the season. The saints could use the money it would 
provide. Thomas was chosen to be in charge because of his experience. Men of other skills were 
also chosen to help prairie travelers, for example a doctor, a blacksmith and a carpenter stayed 
behind. 

They put up a sign 28 miles out on the trail advertising their experienced service. This 
wouldn't have been necessary except they had competitors, who were unwilling to work with 
them, so they moved to a better spot down river. 

Thomas sent a letter to Brigham Young telling him that the bulk of prairie travelers had 
crossed and they would be leaving early in July. They divided the money they had earned and 
each man received $60.50. A few men stayed behind to continue the service for late comers. 

Thomas and a few men left to find to their families. They ran out of provisions and for 3 
1/2 days all they had for food was one skunk, which they all shared. Then they came to an 
Indian camp where they were given buffalo meat. Thomas thought the meal was the best he had 
ever eaten. The men eventually found their families and continued Westward. 

They had many experiences as they crossed the plains. Thomas' daughter Jane related the 
following incident: "One morning we thought we would go and gather gooseberries. Father 
Tanner (as we familiarly called the good, patriarchal Elder Nathan Tanner) harnessed a span of 
horses to a light wagon, and with two sisters by the name of Lyman, his little granddaughter, and 
we started out. When we reached the woods we told the old gentleman to go to a house in sight 
and rest himself while we picked the berries. It was not long before the little girl and I strayed 
some distance from the rest, when suddenly we heard shouts. The little girl thought it was her 
grandfather, and was about to answer, but I restrained her, thinking it might be Indians. We 
walked forward until we could see Father Tanner. He was running his team around. We thought 
nothing strange at first, but as we approached, we saw Indians gathering around the wagon, 
whooping and yelling as others came and joined them. As we got into the wagon, four of the 
Indians took hold of the wagon wheels to stop the wagon, and two others held the horses by the 
bits, and another came to take me out of the wagon. I then began to be afraid and ran for 
assistance. Brother Tanner said, 'No poor child; it is too late!" I told him they should not take me 



404 



alive. His face was as white as a sheet. The Indians had commenced to strip him and had taken 
his watch and handkerchief. They were trying to pull me out of the wagon. I began silently to 
appeal to my Heavenly Father. While praying and struggling, the spirit of the Almighty fell upon 
me and I arose with great power; and no tongue can tell my feelings. I was happy as I could be. 
A few moments before 1 saw worse than death staring me in the face, and now my hand was 
raised by the power of God. and I talked to those Indians in their own language. They let go of 
the horses and wagon, and they all stood in front of me while I talked to them by the power of 
God. They bowed their heads and answered k Yes,' in a way that made me know what they 
meant. The little girl and Father Tanner looked on in speechless amazement. I realized our 
situation: their calculation was to kill Father Tanner, burn the wagon, and take us women 
prisoners. This was plainly shown me. When I stopped talking they shook hands with all three of 
us, and returned all they had taken from Father Tanner. I gave them some berries and crackers. 
By this time the other women came up, and we hastened home." 

Thomas eventually entered the Salt Lake Valley with the Charles C. Rich Company. 
Upon their arrival in the Salt Lake Valley October 2, 1 847, they immediately began preparing for 
winter. It was a hard winter living on a few provisions they still had left from their journey, along 
with some roots. 

The next spring of 1848, Thomas moved his family to the Centerville area because of the 
good grazing and water. The Indians were hostile, but they took the risk. They built a cabin and 
planted crops. Thomas was able to raise 300 bushels of wheat despite the cricket problems. He 
dug a ditch around his field and filled it with water. When the crickets tried to cross the water 
they killed them with switches. To those who needed help he sold the wheat for $2.00 per 
bushel, while other men were selling it for $5.00 a bushel. 

That fall they moved to Farmington area to get better water rights. It was a very hard 
winter. The snow was so high they made a tunnel to the animal shed to care for the animals. 
Thomas didn't spend the winter of 1848 in Utah, he was in California settling some matters of 
business for President Young with the saints that had traveled from the East by boat to San 
Francisco. While camping in Southern California, the Indians stole their horses and the company 
had to walk to Sacramento. All they had to eat was wild game. 

Thomas settled President Young's business and then joined the gold miners. Thomas 
went to a dealer and asked him for $1000 for thirty days, to buy provisions and tools for mining. 
The man looked at him for a minute and said, "You can have it" After thirty days he paid the 
note and bought another supply of provisions. He remained until his health gave out; then went 
to Sacramento to recuperate preparatory for the trip home. 

While he was sitting in a hotel in Sacramento a landlord came to him and said, "You are 
the man I'm looking for. I will pay you $1000 a month to supervise the building of my hotel." 
Thomas went to work and remained one month, and then told the landlord he could not stay any 
longer. The man offered to send for his family. Thomas said, "No. There is not enough money in 
Sacramento Valley to keep me here. " 

Thomas traveled home in company with some of the men who came on the ship 
"Brooklyn". When they arrived in Salt Lake they had completed the assignment the church had 
sent them on. This is a copy from the Deseret News: "At 7 P.M. President Brigham Young, John 
Taylor, Charles C. Rich, and other brethren met at the home of Jedediah M. Grant and received 
$1,280.00 in coin and $3,000.00 in gold dust as tithing which had been brought in from Amasa 
M. Lyman and the California Saints by Thomas Grover." 

Thomas also brought back some gold he mined for his family. He stayed the winter in 
Utah, then sold his farm and took Hannah & Loduska Tupper and some of their children back to 



405 



Iowa to buy cattle and bring them west. They were gone over three years. Hannah had three 
children and Loduska had two children while they were living near Council Bluffs, Iowa on 
Mesquite Creek. They brought Hannah Ladd Tupper, Mother of Hannah and Loduska, back to 
Farmington, Utah to live with them. Records list her as the first person to be buried in the 
Farmington Cemetery in Farmington, Utah. Thomas also brought back 1 50 head of cattle, some 
young calves and 10 yoke of oxen. 

Jedediah M. Grant of the First Presidency spent part of the winter with them because of 
his bad health. When he was ready to leave, Thomas gave him a team of horses and a light spring 
wagon. 

Thomas returned to Utah in 1853, with his family. He bought land in Farmington and 
settled once again. Thomas planted during a warm spell in early February and was able to 
harvest 700 bushels of wheat early and saved it from grasshoppers. That year the wheat would 
have sold for $5.00 a bushel on the public market, but Brother Grover loaned and sold every 
bushel of it, except enough for his own family, for the tithing office price of $2.00 a bushel. 

This story is recorded in the L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia , "At this time Sister 
Brown, a widow, sent her boy to ask Brother Grover to sell her a little flour, just a few pounds. 
Brother Grover sent his son to fill a grain sack full of flour and put it on the boy's wagon. The 
flustered youth asked how much a whole sack of flour would cost, adding that he had only a little 
money. Brother Grover replied, T do not sell flour to widows and fatherless children/ As the 
sack was placed upon the wagon the happy boy drove away in tears." 

During the fall of 1854, Thomas was elected to the Utah Legislature. He served three 
terms, part of the time his sessions were in Fillmore. He also served as Probate Judge of Davis 
County. 

In 1856 he was called on a Home Mission to the saints in Utah. He worked mostly in 
Tooele and Salt Lake Counties. Then his assignment was changed to Davis County so he could 
be closer to home. 

When the Cottonwood Canyon Canal was constructed, Thomas contributed 25 young 
cows to transport the granite blocks to build the Salt Lake Temple. 

The Mormon Reformation occurred in 1856-1857. It was an effort by church leaders to 
encourage the members to live the gospel better and put their houses in order. Thomas was very 
involved in the movement. He attended many conferences with the brethren and preached. 

One of the results of the movement was an increase in plural marriages. It was not 
uncommon in the early days of the Church, when polygamy was being practiced, for a widow or 
a young woman to marry a man so she would have someone to rely on for her keep. Thomas 
Grover took four more wives. Twenty-four year old Mary Potts, from England, was married to 
Thomas on March 24, 1855 in the Endowment House. The marriage was cancelled on September 
7, 1855. She later married Mr. Pherson or Pearson. Thomas married Emma Walker on October 
29, 1856. Less than 3 months later, on January 24, 1857 he married Elizabeth Walker, also from 
England (they were not sisters). They each gave birth to 9 children. Emma's children are as 
follows: Katurah, Rozella, Henry Alford, Amy Blanche, Vernicia, William Frank, Abner, David, 
Albert Isaiah. Elizabeth's children are as follows: Clara, Walter Leonard, Elizabeth Burnett, 
Zeruah May, Enoch, Polly Alice, Alma Frederick, Samuel, and Layfayette. (Please refer to 
family group sheets for further details). Between the marriages of Elizabeth and Emma he 
married Amorette Allen. She was born on April 19, 1838 and married Thomas on December 28, 
1856 in the Presidents office. They were sealed on March 10, 1859 in the Endowment House, 
only months later on November 29, 1859, the LDS Historical Department shows that they were 
divorced. Amorette married Lewis Ricks and they had a family. 



406 



Although these marriages didn't last long, the Thomas Grover family continued to grow. 
The Grover Mansion was finished in 1856, it was located on Main Street in Farmington, Utah. 
We don't know how many of Thomas' fifty one children ever lived in the home, but it must have 
been well used, when we also consider the fact that he had two hundred forty five grandchildren. 

The Utah War began in 1857. In May the saints had to evacuate and go south for 
protection. The Grovers were sad to leave their newly completed home so soon. They went to 
Provo, but didn't have to stay long as the church worked out a peaceful agreement with the 
United States Army in June. 

Thomas had a big heart and tried to help wherever he could. Some Indians fell upon the 
Mormon colony near Salmon River, Idaho. Thomas sent a man with a horse, a pack animal and 
provisions to those left helpless and in distress. 

Thomas contributed half the ground for the Farmington meeting house. He also fed and 
boarded the men free of charge during its construction. When the perpetual emigration fund was 
started, Thomas sent one yoke of oxen and two wagons each year for as long as teams were sent 
back for the poor. The Lord blessed Thomas with more than sufficient. He gave freely to the 
church on several occasions and was able to support a very large family. 

Thomas was faithful even through times of heartache. His 3rd wife, Hannah decided to 
leave and go live with her son Thomas in Nephi. She also chose to be sealed to Daniel H. Wells. 
Hannah was the wife he saw in a dream and it was a very trying time for Thomas. 

Thomas, a fearless, large frontiersman, who lived a colorful life, was never apprehended 
by the federal agents for practicing polygamy, however he did receive visits from a few of them. 
Here are a couple of stories as told by the family. 

"One day such a stranger knocked at the door of the home of Thomas and Loduska 
Tupper Grover. Loduska, (Doiska), announced to Thomas that a stranger was waiting to see him. 
Much to her consternation, Thomas said: "Show him in, show him in!" As the man entered, 
Thomas greeted him with 'How are you, brother?" along with other cordial questions and 
remarks. At this point the man announced that he was a Marshall, and had come to pick Grover 
up, to deliver him to the authorities. It must be remembered that Grover had been a member of 
the bodyguard of the Prophet Joseph Smith, to protect him in the days of violence against the 
Saints. At the stranger's announcement of his intention, Thomas Grover arose, and said: 'Doiska, 
get me Brother Joseph's sword. . .and watch while I cut this man's head off.' Of course, the 
prospect of the sword in the hand of Thomas. . .a large, powerful and firm-speaking man. . .was 
admittedly frightening. At any rate, the stranger quickly departed. . .without making his arrest." 
(The sword can be seen in the basement of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum in Salt 
Lake City, 2006). 

"Another time a Deputy Marshall came to his home to serve a writ on him for polygamy. 
When the man appeared at the door and announced that he had a writ to serve, Brother Grover 
shouted in his sonorous voice, 'Read it, Read it!' The officer fumbled in his pocket for the paper, 
but in his excitement could not find it. At the repeated command 'Read it!' he turned and fled 
from the house in terror. That warrant was never served. " 

Thomas continued to be very active in the church. He was called to be the senior member 
of the High Council in Davis County in 1887. The last week of his life is told as follows from 
Andrew Jensen in the Historical Record. 

"About the last Sunday in the life of Thomas Grover he attended the Sacrament meeting 
in Farmington Ward. He listened during the service including the final number by the choir and 
the closing prayer. As the Amen was spoken and the people were about to move. Brother 
Thomas suddenly raised his hand and said: 'Wait a minute Bishop." Then he added that he could 



407 



not go home until he had borne his testimony that the gospel was true and that Joseph Smith was 
a prophet of God. All during his late years he seemed to feel that his special mission was to 
testify to the divine mission of Joseph Smith." 

"On Monday evening, February 17, 1886 he presided at the High Council meeting of 
Davis Stake. As he returned home he announced that he was sick. On Thursday February 20, 
1886 he passed to the great beyond leaving four wives and twenty-six living children to carry on 
his work." (The Deseret News noted that he died of pneumonia on Saturday the 22.) L.D.S. 
Biographical Encyclopedia. 

Thomas Grover was baptized September 1834. Zion's Camp was organized May 5, 
1834. The men were discharged June 21, 1834. Therefore, Thomas was never a member of 
Zion's Camp. For more information refer to History of The Church by Joseph Smith, Volume II 
pages, 63, 123. 

At a reunion of the family held in Parker, Idaho, July 22, 1902, his daughter Emeline 
Grover Rich said, "My father was loved by all who knew him. He never spoke evil of anyone; he 
did not boast, and he did not take honor unto himself. Many times he had divided his last meal 
with a sufferer. His word was as good as his bond. He could neither be bought nor sold. He was 
incapable of a little mean or treacherous trick. Not one of his children has apostatized." 

Thomas Grover was honored in 2004, when his descendents met in Farmington, Utah for 
a family reunion and unveiled a lovely new head stone that replaced the original stone. Rosaland 
Thornton, a descendant of Thomas through Caroline Whiting, headed the committee for that 
project. Loren Grover, a descendant of Caroline Nickerson Hubbard Grover, acted as co- 
chairman. 

This history of Thomas Grover was compiled from existing histories, articles and 
documents in our family's possession. It was compiled by Darlene Piquet Stoker and Joan Piquet 
Nykamp, great great granddaughters of Thomas Grover. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Thomas Grover, His Ancestors & Descendents by Stephen E. and Dean R. Grover 

L.D.S. Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol. IV by Andrew Jensen 

The Life of Thomas Grover, Utah Pioneer by Mark Grover 1970 

History of Thomas Grover by Hannah Grover Hegsted 

Our Thomas Grover by Joel Grover 

Ancestry and Genealogy of Thomas Grover, Utah Pioneer, 1847 by Joel Grover 

Diary of Caroline Nickerson Hubbard Grover Stewart 

LDS Historical Department 

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia - Emeline Grover Rich's personal diary (daughter of Thomas 

Grover & Caroline Whiting) 

History of the Church - Joseph Smith 



408 



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409 



THOMAS GROVER - SUPERINTENDENT OF FERRY 

Thomas Grover was undoubtedly selected to accompany the pioneer company because of 
his wide experience with boats, for President Brigham Young knew there would be need of 
experienced ferrymen in crossing the rivers between them and their final destination. Mr. Grover 
was born July 22, 1807 in Whitehall, New York, the son of Thomas and Polly Spaulding Grover. 
His father died when he was an infant leaving his mother to rear and provide for a large family. 
When Thomas was twelve years of age he worked as a cabin boy on a boat on the Erie Canal, 
and twelve years later he became the captain of the boat. In 1828 he married Caroline Whiting, 
the daughter of Nathaniel Whiting and Mercey Young. A few years later he moved his wife and 
daughter to Freedom, New York and it was here he heard and accepted the teachings of the 
Mormon Elders. 

When the pioneer company reached the North Fork of the Platte River, Thomas Grover 
was appointed superintendent of the ferry by order of President Brigham Young. Those who 
were appointed to stay with the ferry were called together by President Young, namely. Captain 
Thomas Grover, John Higbee, Appleton M. Harmon, William Empey, Luke Johnson, Edmund 
Ellsworth, F.M. Pomeroy, James Davenport and Benjamin F. Stewart. They received verbal 
instructions, also instructions in writing to which they all agreed: 

North Fork of the Platte River, Upper Ferry, June 18, 1847, 125 miles west of Fort 
Laramie. 

Instructions to the above names are repeated, brethren, as you are about to stop at this 
place for a little season, for the purpose of passing emigrants over the river and assisting the 
Saints, we have thought fit to appoint Thomas Grover, Superintendent of the Ferry and of your 
company. If you approve, we want you to agree that you will follow his counsel implicitly and 
without gainsaying and we desire that you should be agreed in all your operations, acting in 
concert, keeping together continually and not scattering to hunt. 

At your leisure, put yourselves up a comfortable room that will afford yourselves and 
horses protection against the Indians should a war party pass this way. But first of all see that 
your boats are properly secured by fastening raw hides over the tops of the canoes or some better 
process. Complete the landings, and be careful of lives and property of all you labor for, 
remembering that you are responsible for all accidents through your carelessness or negligence 
and that you retain not that which belongs to the traveler. 

For one family wagon, you will charge $1.50, payment in flour and provisions as stated 
prices or $3.00 in cash. You had better take young stock at a fair valuation instead of cash and a 
team if you should want the same to remove. Should emigration cease before our brethren 
arrive, cache your effects and return to Laramie and wait their arrival, and come on with them to 
the place of location. We promise you that the superintendent of the ferry shall never lack 
wisdom or knowledge to devise and counsel you in righteousness and for your best good, if you 
will always be agreed and in all humility, watch and pray without ceasing. When our emigration 
companies arrive, if the river is fordable, ferry them and let them who are able pay a reasonable 
price. The council of their camp will decide who are able to pay. 

Let a strict account be kept of every man's labor, also of all wagons and teams ferried and 
all receipts and expenditures allowing each man according to his labor and justice, and if anyone 
feels aggrieved let him not murmur, but be patient until you come up and let the council decide. 
The way not to be aggrieved is for every man to love his brother as himself. 



410 



The following is a copy of a letter sent by Thomas Grover's son to the Semi-Centennial 
Committee telling of his father's experiences at the ferry and later life. 

"Our family crossed the Mississippi River in February, 1846 and traveled with the Saints 
to Winter Quarters, now Florence, Nebraska, where father, during the winter of 1846-1847, done 
the butchering for the Saints and in the spring of 1847 he was chosen one of the pioneers and 
went with that company as far as the North Platte where a stop was made. President Young 
called a meeting for the purpose of devising means of crossing the river, in this meeting a plan 
was put forth which father did not think would work and he left the meeting and went to bed. At 
the close of the meeting Stephen Markham, father's bunk mate, came to bed, and one of the 
brethren came with him to hear what father said of the plan. Father told Marcus he had forgotten 
more about water than President Young knew. This man who came to the wagon with Marcus 
went to President Young with what father said and President called father to account. 

The next morning father told him he had forgotten more about water than he ever knew. 
Father had been a canal boat captain all his life and knew nothing but water. President Young 
rigged their ferry and started it, when President Kimball standing with his hand on father's 
shoulders said, 'Brother Thomas, it runs nice.' 'Yes," said father, 'but when it strikes the current 
it will go under,' He had hardly spoken when it went under. 'Now,' said President Young, 
'Brother Grover, my plan has failed, what is yours?' Father said, T will take two four-mule 
teams and six men and go to the grove of timber yonder and I will get two trees and bring them 
here and will hew them out canoe fashion and lash them together, and tomorrow morning at 
daylight we will have a boat that will carry us safe across the river.' President Young told him to 
get his men and teams and be off. He started with the men and when they arrived at the grove 
they made the selection of the trees and on getting near they found them surrounded with 
rattlesnakes and they killed snakes for three hours before they could get near the trees; but they 
got them down and went to camp and the next morning the boat was in the water as he said it 
would be. 

After the camp, had all crossed the President left father and nine others there to run the 
ferry and father remained until the company came which his family was in. We were in General 
C.C. Rich's company. 

We arrived in Salt Lake Valley October 1847. We remained in the city that winter, then 
in the spring of 1848, we located on the creek where Centerville now is, then to Farmington in 
Davis county on Devil Creek. I remember seeing the Indian ponies feeding by the side of our 
corn and did not eat the corn. In the fall of 1848 father was sent by the President to California to 
settle some business for the Church. He went by way of lower California and settled the 
business." 

Our Pioneer Heritage, The First Company to enter Salt Lake Valley, Page 501-503 



411 



THE MORMON FERRY 

(1847-1852) 





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Origina 


1 Ferry Crew 


Thomas Crovcr 


Captain (professional ferryman) 


William Rmpcy 


Assistant Captain 


Apple-ton Harmon 


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Luke Johnson 


Doctor and hunter 


James Davenport 


Blacksmith 


James Hiphcc 


Herdsman 


Edmund Ellsworth 


Hunter 


Francis I'omcroy 


Hunter 


Benjamin Stewart 


Coal miner at Deer Creek 


Eric Glines 


Cmic member 




North Platte River near the second ferry site 



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Thomas Graver's Plot of Land in Nauvoo, IL 



415 



Thomas Grover Account of Experiences in Missouri, 1838-1840 

In the year A.D. 1836, I moved from the State of New York to the State of 
Missouri, where I purchased 220 acres of land in the County of Caldwell, besides 
a small lot in Jackson County. One hundred twenty acres I purchased from the 
Government, the remainder from individuals. Most of the lands needed 
improvements with good buildings, etc. In the beginning of November 1838 while 
I was at home attending to my concerns, an armed mob came up to my house. One 

of the men whose name was Baldwin, drew a large bowie knife, and swore 

by the "Holy God" that he would cut off my head. This was in consequence of my 
being a Mormon. However, after I had begged for them to spare my life, and he 
seeing my family in tears, he was softened some and did not put his threats 
into execution. The mob obliged me to give up my duplicates (?) for the lands 
which I had pirchased from the Government. 

They destroyed and laid waste my corn fields, and would frequently come to 
my house & would give me and my family abusive language. They would take what 
victuals they wanted, and they searched my house for arms at various times. 
I have frequently hidden from the mob who had threatened to kill me. 

The weather was very cold, and being continually harrassed by 
my enemies, I was taken sick and suffered considerably. After hearing that we 
were ordered by the authorities of the State to leave Missouri, I made 
preparations to go. This was in the winter, and my family suffered much. 
My wife was confined on the road and suffered everything but death itself. My 
children were all sick for several months, and our sufferings were extreme. 

After purchasing land and spending a considerable sum of money in 
improvements, I was driven from my home and was obliged to find shelter out of 
the State of Missouri. 

Illinois, May 9, 1839. Affidavitt of Damages against the State of Missouri 

in consequence of the Governor's Order of Extermination. 

Hogs, cattle and farming tools stollen by Missourians $65. 

Loss on the farm 900. 

Loss on two town lots 75. 

Loss on grain 85. 



$1,125. 
I do hereby certify that the above account is just and true according to the 
best of my knowledge. -(signed) Thomas Grover 

Sworn to before me this 9th day of May 1839. (signature) 

Circuit Court, Adams County, State of Illinois 



416 



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" Grover Inn" also known as the "Big House" Built in 1 856 
Painting by Judy Jensen 




Thomas Grover 



420 




A diorama of the first Primary, can still be viewed in the old 
rock church on Main Street in Farming, Utah. 
Thomas Grover donated part of the land where the church 
stands, to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 




421 




Family Reunion 

May 15, 2004 
Farmington, Utah 




THOMAS GROVER 
Mormon Pioneer 
Wives: 9 
Children: 51 
Grandchildren: 245 
Member of Nauvoo Legion 
Bodyguard to Joseph Smith 
Rescued Prophet Joseph Smith 
from the Rock Island Prison 
Member of Utah Legislature 
Probate Judge of Davis County 



422 



EXCERPTS FROM DIARY OF EMELINE GROVER RICH 

Written in 1890 
(Daughter of Thomas and Caroline Whiting Grover) 

[Page 1] Life of Thomas Grover, the fourth, as far as my recollection serves me, who is 
the subject of this sketch. 

When he was a young man he ran a canal boat on the Erie Canal on a line of boats. He 
accumulated some money, married, and settled down. In course of a year or two he moved to the 
western part of the State, bought a farm, and commenced to improve upon it; built a house and 
was doing well financially. His elder daughter, Jane, was born in Whitehall, Washington Co., 
N.Y. Emeline, Mary E. and Adaline were born in Freedom, Cattaraugus Co., N.Y. Here he 
lived and prospered financially until he joined the church known as Latter-Day Saints. He was 
very liberal with his money, and I have always thought - over zealous. My mother did not like 
to break up her home and go, but went because her husband went - for go he would! 

They moved to Kirtland, Ohio in the spring of 1835, where they were not permitted to 
tarry, but built a temple, and made homes, etc. They were soon driven from Kirtland, and, in a 
destitute condition, started for the State of Missouri, some of the Saints having gone there 
previously and selected a place for the gathering. Now all this was in opposition to the wish of 
my mother, for she it was who had the brunt to bear, traveling by ox team, with four small 
children hundreds of miles. 

How well do I remember her tears, although young at the time, and not realizing at the 
time, as I now do, the cause of her sorrow. My mother was a very different woman in many 
respects from that of my father. I can say truthfully that she was an honest, frugal, industrious 
woman, not so fanatical as was my father. He was so zealous in the cause of which he had 
espoused that he would give the last and all he had to the "Cause", not knowing where he could 
obtain more and this was sometimes a bone of contention between them, for she knew not how to 
live and barely exist. Her family were noted for being industrious, energetic, good people. 

My father settled in Caldwell Co., Missouri. Here he lived four years - prospered 
exceedingly, made a farm, set out an orchard, and had several cows, pigs, chickens, geese, etc., 
in fact was becoming wealthy as fast as could be expected of an industrious farmer, for that he 
was! And in his wife he had a helpmeet in very deed. But, alas! This prosperity was of short 
duration. Trouble began to develop again. We must get [page 2] out of the state, and had but a 
short time given us for which to leave the state. 

My mother had now five children and was daily expecting the sixth. It was winter 
weather, how could she possibly pack up and move in an ox wagon in her condition, and at this 
season of the year? I well remember (young as I was), only 7 years old, of hearing my father 
counseling over the propriety and improprieties of the move. He waited till within three days of 
the time set for us to abandon our homes - our all ! I remember, in the dead of the night, hearing 
my father say these words to my mother, 'Tomorrow I shall have to go - there is only three days 
left for me to get out of this State. You must take your choice - pack up and go with me in the 
morning, or I will go, leaving you here for the present, until you are able to travel, and then I will 
send for you." 

Of course, she true to her woman's instinct, preferred the former, and concluded to take 
chances, and go with her husband. They immediately called my sister, Jane, and me out of bed 
in the dead of night, sending one of us in one direction, and the other in another, half a mile 
distant, calling on our nearest neighbors, to get up and come at once, and help my mother pack 



423 



up and get started on her journey. They responded to the call, came and helped cook victuals to 
last up on our journey, etc., etc. By ten o'clock in the morning we were all piled into a wagon 
drawn by a yoke of cattle jogging on our journey. 

I remember my mother looking back after we had started and seeing her shed tears, as she 
took a last look at her good home for which she and my father had labored so assiduously. She 
saw the Missourians milking our cows before we were yet out of sight of our home, and our 
cows, three in number, were left standing in our cow yard, all unsold farm, and everything that 
could not be carried in one wagon, with seven in the family, and hauled by one yoke of cattle. 

All this time my father seemed happy. He would sing, read the Bible, and make prayers 
an hour long before breakfast, or, as my mother used to tell him, until the breakfast was cold! I 
well remember that she didn't believe in long prayers, especially when prayers were observed 
morning and evening. 

My father and mother were splendid singers. And well I have left - say travels in an 
unfinished state. We traveled steadily day and night, or as long as the team could stand it, to 
travel by being well-fed and cared for. When nearing the edge of the State, [page3] after about 
three days journey, and just in sight of Palmyra, my mother was taken sick with labor pains. My 
father (man-like) thought if she could just postpone matters until he could get into Palmyra, 
where he could call a physician. But, she was not to be put off. He finally called at a nice farm 
house that we were passing, and asked for the hire of a room for the night, as his wife was sick, 
and he wished to stop in a house for the night. He was refused, and directed to the town just 
ahead. He returned to the wagon and found my mother in tears. Without saying a word, he went 
back to the house, told the lady of the house that he must have a room and that in haste! After an 
explanation of the circumstances attending the case, she readily consented, ordering her 
"darkies" to clear a room, make a fire, put the bed in order, etc., and turning to a black girl about 
14 years old, said, "You run for the midwife, so and so, and if you stub your toe and fall down, 
don't you stop to get up!" 

This expression made a lasting impression on my memory, and one which on numerous 
occasions equivalent to that, often comes to mind as I have been in that line of business for about 
30 years. All went well with my mother. She met with friends, even among strangers. 

In due time her sixth daughter was born. We stopped three days, and in the meantime 
our friends administered comfort in every conceivable way by nursing and caring for my mother 
and her family, cooking and washing and helping mother to many comforts to last her on her 
journey. When my father called for his bill the lady of the house told him that the only charge 
she would make was the privilege of naming the baby, which was granted to her, and the Book 
of Mormon, which he left with her. She named her Eliza Ann, a good name indeed, and a good 
woman who bears it. 

I think about the next day we crossed the Mississippi River near Quincy, 111. My father 
rented a farm three miles from the above named place, where we spent the summer, and then 
moved to Commerce (afterward called Nauvoo) in the autumn of 1 839. Here my father rented a 
farm of Mr. Hibbard, lived and tilled this farm two years. 

"Twas here my mother sickened, worn and weary, gave up her life. She had remittent 
bilious fever two or three months previous to her death. My father procured different physicians. 
When one would exhaust his skill (if any he had), leaving her not bettered, he would procure 
another and did until he had had three doctors, and still she was not better. At last, she was 
prematurely confined, had her seventh daughter born. She succumbed a week later, in [page 4] 



424 



the fall of 1841, leaving seven children under eleven years of age. However, the infant, Emma, 
only survived her mother three days. 

We soon learned what home was without a mother. We, her six little daughters, were 
left. My father at the time was heart-broken, but, like others of his sex, he was lonely, and soon 
sought another to fill the place of the departed one. He was not long in finding one who was 
willing to take my dear father with his six orphaned little ones, to father her three children who 
were fatherless, she being a widow. Well now we had a charge in very deed, "tho all ran smooth 
for a time, but "ere long we learned by sad experience that we had no home. We were "too thick 
to thin", as the saying goes, and people there who wished to get a girl were soon pointed our 
way, because we had a house full of girls, there being 8 of us, and but one boy. My stepmother's 
youngest was a boy of 3 years old. Her daughters were of our age, and nine children, beside the 
parents, in one house of one room made us feel that we were too much crowded, so to make it 
better for the smaller ones, we, the largest of the girls, consented to live out from the home, but 
could not stay away a week at a time for getting homesick to see our dear Pa-Pa and our dear 
little Eliza Ann, who by the way, was so sweet to us all. She talked quite young, and her 
chattering still is fresh in my memory. We would ask her where Ma was, and she would say, "in 
bed". We would say, "go and see", and she would shove a chair to the bed-side, climb into it, 
and look all over the bed, and then look so sad, saying, "Ma gone. Ma gone." Then we would all 
cry, childlike, enough to make angels weep, I've often thought. 

A few days at home was sufficient to convince us that home without a mother was not a 
home. My father, about this time, bought him some land, and built a house. His family soon 
began to increase by his second wife, but our home was broken up and the woman that I suppose 
I should have called "Mother", was obnoxious to me, not so much on my own account, as on that 
of my younger sisters. I could not feel in my heart to call her "Mother", that holy word, and 
many were the chastisement I have received on the account of my stubbornness. I would say, 
"How can I ever call a woman so unlike my own dear mother by her sacred name", and to get rid 
of calling her another, would live out most of the time. 

My father labored diligently to maintain his large family, struggling with poverty, 
sickness, and death. Nauvoo was located in a malarial district, and the Saints died off by 
hundreds on account, I presume, of their former exposure in traveling in mid- winter with scarcity 
of food and clothing. 

[page 5] We stopped about 8 years in Nauvoo when we were again driven from our 
homes which we had made comfortable - just beginning to enjoy the fruits of our labor. Our 
family were considerably scattered by this time through necessity, but the inborn love and 
affection for our parent and our dear little orphaned sisters were still bearing in our bosoms like 
an unquenchable fire, as the love we have for our dear mother seemed to be centered on our 
father, who was very loving and kind to his motherless children. He was truly a handsome man, 
called by most people, the handsomest man in Nauvoo! I always looked upon my father with 
admiration. 

In 1846, about the 10 th of February, we, with three teams of oxen and wagons, left all that 
was near and dear to us in Nauvoo, II., and started on our journey into the wilderness, crossing 
the Mississippi River on the ice with the snow-clad ground on which to make our beds with 
naught but the sky for our covering. Women and children had to walk and that through snow, 
mud, and rain, and wet through for days and nights together, traveling as far in a day as our 
teams could stand to travel, from one to six miles was an average distance per day, and 
sometimes we have waded and pulled through mud, hub-deep to our wagons, and camped not 



425 



more than half a mile from where we started, and here let me say, strange as it may seem, that 
not a word of repine or grumbling was heard in our camps, but singing praises to God for his 
deliverance from the midst of our enemies. 

In April we camped near the state line of Missouri, teams worn out, provisions exhausted 
and sickly season commencing. Some of the men went into Mo. to work for provisions while 
our teams rested and recuperated. 

In a few weeks we jogged onward until we came to a good location for a longer resting 
place and so it proved to be to hundreds of the worn-out Saints. We stopped at this place, since 
known as Mt. Pisgah, until the following spring, or at least some of the companies stopped and 
some went onward until they came to the Missouri River, now Omaha, and there stopped for 
Winter Quarters. My father had a good outfit, compared with most of the Saints. The following 
spring, in March, the saints who remained back, or at least those who had not succumbed to 
malaria, came up to Winter Quarters, and rested awhile and prepared to continue their journey to 
the Rocky Mountains. In the meantime it became necessary to send a company of men in 
advance, and on ahead of the companies as Pioneers, to look out the roads, build bridges, 
construct boats on which to cross the streams, etc. [page 6] My father was selected as one of the 
party to go. He left his family, with no boys or men-folks, to come on afterward with the 
company later on. 

I will here relate an incident which happened to my father and family when crossing the 
Mississippi River. The ice at the time had parted and broken away at a point of an island or 
sandbar so that we had to drive onto a flat boat for part of the way. They were going along 
nicely enough when a young fellow on the boat (for want of something better to do, I suppose), 
spat ambier (tobacco juice) into an ox's eye. He commenced to plunge and jump, breaking a 
hole in the bottom of the boat. The ox jumped overboard and was drowned. Also, another yoke 
of cattle and three cows shared the same fate. The boat went down until one end struck the point 
of the sandbar, which left a part of the wagon above water. Some of the family were in the 
covered wagon. My sister, Eliza Ann, who was about seven years old, and a babe six months 
old. The front end of the wagon was pitched down into the water until the wagon stood almost 
on end, the water was filling up the wagon, and she kept climbing for the upper part. She 
happened to think that the little boy, Thomas, was somewhere in the bedding under water. She 
immediately plunged down into the deep water, caught the babe by his dress by one hand, while 
she used the other to help her to climb back on up where she could hold herself by one hand, 
hold of a wagon, how with just her head out of water, holding the babe so that his head was also 
out of water. 

All this time, the mother was standing on the bank, looking on thinking her babe was 
gone, and not being able to render any assistance, until at last, when some of the excitement was 
over someone chanced to think that some one was in the wagon cover, and liberated the almost- 
perished prisoners. Well, now, this was a cold bath in Feb., not a dry thread on them, in the 
wagon and in the middle of this large River, help from the shore was rendered as soon as 
possible. What was to be done was an important question. 

They lost no time getting across the river. There was no house near by. They made a fire 
on the river bank, dried their clothes as quickly as possible, and made themselves as comfortable 
as they could, and strange to say, they were none the worse as far as their health was concerned 
than before it happened! But in goods, cattle, books, etc., they suffered a great loss. My father 
was compelled to yoke some of his cows up with the oxen, and travel on with what they had left, 
after laying by a few days to dry bedding and clothing, etc. etc. Suffice it to say there was no 



426 



lives lost, [page 7] My father's family record with many other valuables, went to the bottom of 
the Mississippi River. 

1 p a g e omitted 



Commencing with my father's travels, and that of his family across the plains, will say 
that my father started from Omaha, early in the spring of 1847, in company with many others 
(50, I think) to explore and find a road to the Great Salt Lake basin, of which they had an idea 
existed somewhere, but road or even a trail there was none. There was a great amount of rain 
that spring, which made this progress slow and also very disagreeable for their families who 
were left, camped out on the banks of the Missouri River where Omaha is now located. 

His wife, Hannah, was confined while living in a covered wagon, had a daughter called 
Hannah, I well remember the night. The rain poured down in torrents, I was kneeling on her bed 
all night, trying to keep her bed dry by scooping the water with my hands first down one side 
then the other so that it would follow down the course of the cover and wagon instead of pouring 
straight through. I would occasionally take off some of the bed covering and wring it, then lay it 
on again to catch the water that we could not divert into channels down the cover on into pans, 
basins, etc. of which there were several on the bed to catch the unruly streams as they poured in, 
in almost torrents. 

I think it was on the 14 th of June, 1847, that we (a number of large companies) started on 
our journey across the plains some with cow teams, some with wild steers yoked with cows 
while some had good ox teams and there were a few horse teams and the hearty - of this, was (if 
1 may be allowed the expression) that of the teamsters of this medley outfit - there were 9 out of 
10 who were girls, women, or children. I can but laugh now when I look back upon that 
picturesque scene (for be it understood that I was one of those teamsters) and at the